Currently viewing the category: "Stinging Slug Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Florianópolis – Brazil
Date: 01/05/2018
Time: 01:29 PM EDT
Dear Mr Bugman, what is this big eating my orange tree?
How you want your letter signed:  Carolina G.

Spider Caterpillar

Dear Carolina,
Your caterpillar is related to a similar looking North American caterpillar called a Monkey Slug.  We posted a caterpillar from Brazil in the past that we identified as
Phobetron hipparchia, and we learned that it is called Lagarta-Aranha locally, which translates to Spider Caterpillar.  Handle with caution.  This caterpillar can sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rainbow spiky caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Victoria, Australia
Date: 01/03/2018
Time: 08:50 PM EDT
I was at St Andrews  market around February or June 2017 when I saw a strange rainbow caterpillar on the tree. It had green spikes and was about the size of a fingernail. It looked poisonous because of it’s spikes but I have no idea.
How you want your letter signed:  From Bethany

Four Spotted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bethany,
In North America, we refer to this as a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and in Australia, the family members are known as Cup Moths.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we are confident this is a Four Spotted Cup Moth Caterpillar,
Doratifera quadriguttata.  The Brisbane Insect site states:  “The Four-spotted Cup Moth caterpillar is colourful, with pale green body, pink back with black and white patterns on the top.  There are eight green spikes on the each side, at the front and end there are a pair of red spikes. On the top of thorax section, there are four hidden red spikes, will erect with stinging hairs when disturbed.”  According to Butterfly House:  “Red stinging hairs are protruded from the four at the front on the thorax when the caterpillar is disturbed.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big hairy orange bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Ohio, USA
Date: 12/03/2017
Time: 09:09 PM EDT
Dear Bugman,
We saw this bug while camping in central Ohio several years ago, and can’t find anything like it and are wondering what it is. It crawled along quite like a snail, but left no trail and had no shell. When it moved the leaf-like formations undulated in a wave-like motion.
How you want your letter signed:  Mary Skrenta

Monkey Slug

Dear Mary,
This is a Caterpillar that is commonly called a Monkey Slug.  They should be handled with caution as they are capable of stinging.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stinging caterpillar? It’s a beauty!
Geographic location of the bug:  San Antonio, Tx, 90 degree October day.
Date: 10/21/2017
Time: 02:10 AM EDT
Hello wonderful bugmen!
I found this beauty in my front yard, my kids and I enjoyed it without touching it. I try to teach appreciation without disturbing. Not sure of what exactly we were appreciating, though, but after searching through your fb feed thought maybe it shared some similarities to a stinging caterpillar? It was only maybe 1-1.5” long, small little thing, but gorgeous nonetheless. Thank you for all that you do! I love your site and appreciate your work!
How you want your letter signed:  Monica Barrientes

Stinging Slug Caterpillar: Euclea species

Dear Monica,
We love your philosophy of educating your children to appreciate the wonders of the natural world while exercising caution.  Many otherwise harmless creatures have developed defenses to protect themselves from predators and other threats, and they do not attach unnecessarily, but caution should be exercised when handling them, though one is often better not handling them.  You are correct that this is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  Based on this BugGuide image, we are confident it is in the genus
Euclea, a group that includes the Spiny Oak Slug, but we cannot identify the species with certainty.  According to BugGuide:  “NOTE: BugGuide photos from the southeastern states previously identified as Spiny Oak-Slug Moth (Euclea delphinii) have been moved to the genus page because we have no information (as of December 2006) on how to distinguish adults or larvae of delphinii from the virtually identical Euclea nanina.”  Three members of the genus are found in Texas.  According to BugGuide:  “E. delphinii: southern Quebec and New Brunswick to Florida, west to Texas and Oklahoma, north to Minnesota.  E. incisa: Arizona east to central Texas.  E. nanina: South Carolina to Florida, west to Texas.”

Stinging Slug Caterpillar: Euclea species

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spiky Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  North Vietnam
Date: 09/26/2017
Time: 08:41 AM EDT
Today, we found this caterpillar. Rather, it found us. It stung of us in the head, and hurt like hell. The locals assured us, that it wasn’t dangerous, just unpleasant. What can you tell us about that nasty fellow?
How you want your letter signed:  The three adventurers

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear The three adventurers,
This is a gorgeous image of a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  We will attempt a species identification.  In the meantime, here is an image from Creative Photography that was also taken in Vietnam, but which is most likely a different species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug wearing green vest
Geographic location of the bug:  Westchester County, NY
Date: 09/12/2017
Time: 02:08 PM EDT
Found this strange bug outside our home and have never seen anything like this
How you want your letter signed:  Bug Patrol

Saddleback Caterpillar

Dear Bug Patrol,
Handle with caution.  This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar known as a Saddleback Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination