Currently viewing the category: "Stinging Slug Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bright happy worm
Geographic location of the bug:  Livermore, KY
Date: 02/20/2020
Time: 06:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This pretty little worm was found on a tractor in the river bottoms of Livermore,KY. It was late summer, around the end of August when it was found. I have never seen a worm like this before and no one I’ve asked can identify it either. I’d love to know what this little guy’s species is!
How you want your letter signed:  Curious worm lady

Stinging Rose Caterpiller

Dear Curious worm lady,
Your “bright happy worm” is a perfect example of the concept of “look but don’t touch” because it is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  We identified it as a Stinging Rose Caterpiller,
Parasa indetermina, thanks to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it??
Geographic location of the bug:  Shark Valley, Everglades National Park
Date: 12/13/2019
Time: 01:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!
Never seen anything quite like this. It was on a cocoplum leaf.
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Unknown Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Mike,
This is definitely a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  The red color is quite unusual.  We believe it might be a Crowned Slug Caterpillar,
Isa textula, which is pictured on BugGuide, but we cannot locate any images of red individuals.  Sometimes caterpillars change colors right before metamorphosis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Slug caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Ionia mi
Date: 10/24/2019
Time: 11:51 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was on my boat cover this summer which was parked under some walnut trees. Please help identify.
How you want your letter signed:  Ben

Skiff Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ben,
You have the Slug Moth Caterpillar Limacodidae correct.  This is a Skiff Moth Caterpillar,
Prolimacodes badia, and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  Your individual has much larger tubercles that those on most pictured specimens.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of wide variety of trees and shrubs, including birch, blueberry, cherry, chestnut, Hophornbeam (Ostrya virginiana), oak, poplar, Sweetgale (Myrica gale), willow, and others” so we suppose “others” can include walnut.

Skiff Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Request for Bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Badlapur ,District- Thane,state- Maharashtra, India
Date: 08/11/2019
Time: 01:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Got sting from same(image Attached) today in my backyards on wrists it was very painful.
Got bump on sting area.
Requesting Information
How you want your letter signed:  Subhash D

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Subhash D,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, and stings are reported to be quite painful.  We have not had any luck finding a close visual match to your caterpillar, but this image from Learn About Butterflies does illustrate the physical family traits generally associated with Stinging Slug Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rare Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern New Jersey
Date: 08/08/2019
Time: 07:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This weird/rare looking insect is eating the leaves on our Asian pear tree & when my husband pulled one off a leaf it stung him & left his skin feeling temporarily numb.
How you want your letter signed:  Sharon Beningo

Saddleback Caterpillar

Dear Sharon,
The Saddleback Caterpillar,
Acharia stimulea, is not considered rare, and BugGuide reports sightings in much of eastern North America.  The stinging capability of the Saddleback Caterpillar is well documented, including on Featured Creatures where it states:  “Color patterns are aposematic, or having bright warning colors that denote toxicity or distastefulness” and “The large spines and potent hemolytic venom rank it as one of the most important North American species of urticating caterpillars.”

Thanks so much for your quick response. We will definitely not be touching any more of them!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa, highveld
Date: 02/19/2019
Time: 09:42 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These are about an inch long, and are aggressively moving through my garden. May be responsible for some painful skin reactions, but unconfirmed. Any idea what they are, and what they’ll turn into?
How you want your letter signed:  Jon

Stinging Slug Caterpillars

Dear Jon,
These are Stinging Slug Caterpillars in the family Limocodidae and we have previously identified them as
Latoia vivida.  Stinging Slug Caterpillars should be handled with extreme caution as they are capable of delivering a painful sting.

Wow, that was fast. Thank you so much!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination