Currently viewing the category: "Silkworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  East Texas
Date: 10/16/2017
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
I work at a ranch in rusk Texas and I came across this caterpillar and I’ve never seen this kind before kinda want to know what kind it is and if it is poisonous
How you want your letter signed:  Aaron

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear Aaron,
Despite its fierce appearance, the Hickory Horned Devil is perfectly harmless.  This individual has grown to its maximum size, so it left the hickory, walnut or other food tree and it is searching for a suitable place to dig beneath the surface of the ground to pupate.

Hickory Horned Devil

Thank you so much you helped a lot I let him go yesterday where I found him.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Colbert Oklahoma
Date: 10/06/2017
Time: 10:44 AM EDT
What is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Roxanne

Io Moth Caterpillar

Dear Roxanne,
This is an Io Moth Caterpillar.  Handle with caution as they can sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma
Date: 09/26/2017
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
Hi! What is this gorgeous caterpillar going to be?
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy

Io Moth Caterpillar

Dear Cindy,
This is an Io Moth Caterpillar and adult Io Moths are sexually dimorphic.  If this is a female, the adult female Io Moth has brown upper wings and spectacular eyespots on the underwings, while the adult male Io Moth has yellow upper wings and equally impressive eyespots.  Handle with caution.  Io Moth Caterpillars can sting.  Because of the time of year and your location, when this Io Caterpillar spins its cocoon, it will overwinter and emerge in the spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Green & Fuzzy
Geographic location of the bug:  Orrick, MO
Date: 09/24/2017
Time: 05:09 PM EDT
@In mid-September, my husband accidentally kicked this guy on the ground. He thought it was some sort of “premature pinecone”. Low and behold, it moved. That’s when we realized that is was some sort of large caterpillar. It almost seemed like it had a hard shell, but I didn’t touch him to find out. We left him on the ground and don’t know what happened to him but still curious as to what it was…
How you want your letter signed:  D&C at Shak Creek

Pre-Pupal Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear D&C at Shak Creek,
This is a pre-pupal Imperial Moth Caterpillar.  Just prior to pupation, many caterpillars change color and search for an appropriate site to commence metamorphosis.  As pupation time nears, the caterpillars become more sluggish.

Pre-Pupal Imperial Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown catepillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Pennsylvania
Date: 09/19/2017
Time: 01:22 PM EDT
Can’t figure out what kind of catepillar this is, can you help?
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Sarah,
This is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar, and the orange color indicates it is pre-pupal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar ID ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Western NC
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 01:39 PM EDT
I discovered the caterpillar in the attached photo over the weekend at my home in Western NC – and was wondering what it is ?
any information you could provide would be greatly appreciated
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Don Underwood

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Don,
This impressive caterpillar is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar and its orange color indicates it is pre-pupal.  It has recently come down from the deciduous or coniferous tree upon which it was feeding.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of Bald Cypress, basswood, birch, cedar, elm, hickory, Honeylocust, maple, oak, pine, Sassafras (
Sassafras albidum), Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), sycamore, walnut.  Adults do not feed.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination