Currently viewing the category: "Silkworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fuzzy reddish/orange, black and white caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Dulce, Guatemala
Date: 02/19/2019
Time: 08:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this caterpillar inching along the ground today (feb 19, 2019) and haven’t had any luck figuring out what type it it! I thought maybe in the Tussock family?
How you want your letter signed:  Emily

Shag Carpet Caterpillar

Dear Emily,
This is a very distinctive and impressive looking Caterpillar.  Our first hunch is the superfamily Noctuoidea which includes the Tussock Moths.  We will attempt to provide you with a species identification, and perhaps our readership will be able to provide some information.

Facebook Comment from Karla Thompson
Prothysana felderi.
Shag Carpet caterpillar.

Update
We learned the Shag Carpet Caterpillar is in the family Apatelodidae, the American Silkworm Moths.  According to All About Butterflies:  “The larva of 
Prothysana felderi varies in appearance from instar to instar. It also occurs in various colour forms across its geographical range. Some varieties have a buff or olive ground colour, with tussocks of red setae on the thoracic and anal segments, while others are deep red, with ribbons of black or white setae along the backs.  The larvae feed on Philodendron, Heliconia, Welfia, Aegifila, Chamaedora, Piptocarpha, Pentaclethra, Piper, Stigmaphyllon, Neea, Lycianthes, and Heliocarpus.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Mbeya, Tanzania
Date: 02/07/2019
Time: 03:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugma:  We found this caterpillar in our yard today! We’re wondering what it will turn into? It sure is beautiful!
How you want your letter signed:  The Ornelas family

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Ornelas family,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar from the family Saturniidae.  This Caterpillar does not look well and we fear it will not survive to adulthood.  Perhaps it is the victim of internal parasites.  We will attempt to identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillars, black with red spots and white spines
Geographic location of the bug:  Harare, Zimbabwe
Date: 01/31/2019
Time: 05:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hundreds of these caterpillars appear on only one tree in the garden, only in January. Sorry we don’t know the name of the tree either! We would love to know what butterfly or moth they turn into.
How you want your letter signed:  Julian

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Dear Julian,
We are very amused by your image of a bowl full of Cabbage Emperor Moth Caterpillars,
Bunaea alcinoe, because this species is eaten in some regions.  More information on the nutritional content can be found on this Eureka Mag article.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I’ve never seen anything like this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  McKinney Texas
Date: 01/07/2019
Time: 04:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug when working on my foundation. I thought it was a tool at first, I put it on my workbench outside. This AM when I started working outside I found it again and wondered how it fell off the bench and made it that far away. I put it back on the bench and got back to work, about an hour later I saw it moving… a lot. I put it back where I got it from. I had that thing close to my face, smelled it and everything…. gave me the creeps after I found out it was a bug. If you look at it closely the little pattern resembled a decoration you might find on an older tool’s handle.
How you want your letter signed:  Paul in McKinney

Giant Silkmoth Pupa

Dear Paul,
This is a moth Pupa, the intermediate state between the caterpillar and the adult during which time metamorphosis occurs.  Large moth pupae found underground are generally members of two families:  Sphingidae the Sphinx Moths and Saturniidae the Giant Silkmoths.  We believe your pupa is a member of the latter family, but we cannot provide an exact species identification.  We do not believe it is an Imperial Moth or Regal Moth because it differs from these individuals posted to our site.  Most members of the family found in Texas build a cocoon, but a number of species form a naked pupa underground like the one you discovered.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Antigua Guatemala
Date: 10/21/2018
Time: 03:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I found these caterpillars in my garden in Antigua Guatemala in July.
I made some research and it could be a Costa Rican hairy caterpillar (Automeris metzli ?) but I am not sure as Antigua is located at 1600 m in the mountains…
What do you think ?
Thank you !
How you want your letter signed:  Voiz

Automeris Caterpillar

Dear Voiz,
We believe you have the genus
Automeris correct, but we are not certain of the species.  It looks to us like it might be Automeris boucardi, but we will check with Bill Oehlke to see if he can verify the species identity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Oklahoma
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 02:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
My friend and I were walking yesterday and came across this beauty.  Could you please tell us what it is?  Thanks for the help!
How you want your letter signed:  Dana and Laurie

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Dana and Laurie,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the family Saturniidae, and based on this BugGuide image, we are nearly certain it is a pre-pupal Luna Moth Caterpillar.  This species often turns from green to orange as its time for pupation approaches.

Thank you so much for the information!  My 2nd graders just submitted an entry to the Ugly Bug Contest so I’m really paying attention to bugs right now.  I’ll share this experience with them so that they know that this is available to them.  Really appreciate your time!
Dana Stair
Gifted Resources Coordinator
Jefferson Elementary
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination