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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spikey Caterpiller
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Ohio
Date: 09/16/2018
Time: 01:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this outside of my home in southern Ohio, is this a brush footed Caterpillar? Are they harmful to humans?
How you want your letter signed:  Shane

Buckmoth Caterpillar

Dear Shane,
Though there are many spiny caterpillars in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, we believe your caterpillar is a Buckmoth Caterpillar,
Hemileuca maia, based on this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Catapillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Backyard in Northern Illinois
Date: 08/31/2018
Time: 07:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is it? I think I’ve seen a green one on my sidewalk 3 yrs ago.
How you want your letter signed:  LikesBugsNot

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear LikesBugsNot,
The orange color on this Imperial Moth Caterpillar indicates it is pre-pupal, and it has left the tree or shrub upon which it was feeding in order to find an appropriate place to pupate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Upstate New York
Date: 08/23/2018
Time: 09:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m having trouble identifying this caterpillar…
How you want your letter signed:  Katy

Io Moth Caterpillar

Dear Katy,
This distinctive caterpillar is an Io Moth Caterpillar, and it should be handled with caution as it has stinging spines.  The adult Io moth is sexually dimorphic, with male Io Moths having yellow upper wings while those of the female Io Moth are brown.  Both sexes have pronounced eye-spots on the underwings that might help to startle predators.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Ontario
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 08:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Have searched a bit but not confident about what type this is.
Possibly an imperial?
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Cindy,
This is indeed an Imperial Moth Caterpillar, and its darker coloration indicates it is getting ready to pupate.  Caterpillars will frequently change color and leave the host plant when it is time to pupate, so we are guessing it was found on the ground as Imperial Moth Caterpillars pupate underground.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found this in my garden
Geographic location of the bug:  Clinton Corners, New York
Date: 08/07/2018
Time: 11:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what kind of caterpillar this is  ?
How you want your letter signed:  Brenda

Spotted Apatelodes Caterpillar

Dear Brenda,
This appears to be the same species, or a close relative of an unidentified Caterpillar we posted three days ago.  We wrote:  “Your caterpillar looks remarkably like both the Caterpillar of the American Dagger Moth and the Caterpillar of the Banded Tussock Moth, but the pattern of the black tufts of hair on your caterpillar are noticeably different. ”  We are pretty certain this is not a Caterpillar in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we will contact Arctiid expert Julian Donahue to see if he recognizes them.  What is the food plant?

Julian Donahue provides an identification.
Hi Daniel,
Good for you to suspect the identification–it is neither of the two candidates.
Both of these are larvae of the Spotted Apatelodes Moth (Apatelodes torrefacta; Apatelodidae).
More images of adults and larvae, and distribution, here: http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=7663

All the best,
Julian

It was on an Azalea plant.
Brenda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rainbow Spike Slug
Geographic location of the bug:  Heuvelton, NY
Your letter to the bugman:  WHAT IS THIS BUG?
How you want your letter signed:  Jo

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jo,
This is a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar.  It will spin a cocoon and eventually emerge as an adult Cecropia Moth, one of the largest North American moths.

THANK YOU SO MUCH!
Thank you oh so very much, and I hope this message makes you smile!
Jo

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination