Currently viewing the category: "Prominent Moth Caterpillars"
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Caterpillars from Puerto Rico (moths?) Sun, Jan 25, 2009 at 7:18 AM
These caterpillars were photographed in the humid karstic forest of northern Puerto Rico. The one with the “horns” is huge. I found it on a Piper shrub (Piperaceae), and the several I’ve seen are always out at night. At first I thought it would be a species of Heraclides (Papilionidae) but after checking some pictures, I decided it can’t be. I was photographed in summer (though seasons i Puerto Rico are not well defined, except rainy/dry).
The other caterpillar was shot by day, in the same general habitat. I was photographed just a couple of weeks ago.
I have a lot of unidentified insects in my website on Caribbean Natural History ( www.kingsnake.com/westindian ). If it is OK with you, perhaps you can pay it a visit and provide me with any corrections/information you might think is relevant.
Thanks a lot for your kind help.
Alejandro Sanchez
Puerto Rico, northern karstic humid forest

Unidentified Puerto Rican Caterpillar:  Prominent Moth???

Silverking Butterfly Caterpillar

Hello again Alejandro,
We fear we are not really being of much assistance to you today. In our humble opinion, we would guess that these might be Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the family Notodontidae. You can see some North American specimens on BugGuide. Many Prominent Moth Caterpillars have unusual projections on their bodies similar to the ones on both of your specimens. We will post your photos in the hope someone can assist in the identification. We will also link to your marvelous website and hope your site doesn’t crash from the additional traffic.

Unidentified Caterpillar from Puerto Rico:  Prominent Moth???

Unidentified Caterpillar from Puerto Rico: Prominent Moth???

Confirmation from Eric Eaton
Monday, January 26, 2009
I think you are probably correct with the caterpillar IDs….
Eric

Update:
Tuesday, January 27, 2009
Hi Daniel:
I haven’t been able to identify the first image but I believe the second one is of a Prominent moth in the genus Nystalea, probably N. collaris. The web site for Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) has a huge searchable database of moth (adult and caterpillar) images, including many for the various instars and color phases of N. collaris. The species ranges from southern Texas to Costa Rica, and the Antilles. Regards.
Karl
Link: http://janzen.sas.upenn.edu/caterpillars/database.lasso

Update: February 13, 2009
Greetings Father Sánchez,
Since my research is limited to the early stages of butterflies (not enough hours in a day to add moths), I can only identify your first photo. It is a caterpillar of the Silverking butterfly, *Archaeoprepona demophoon* (Nymphalidae, Charaxinae), which feeds on several genera in the Lauraceae, its presence on *Piper* a result of wandering. As you discovered, *Heraclides* swallowtail larvae look entirely different and more or less like this:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3600/3280135520_4595b8168b_b.jpg
Best wishes,
Keith Wolfe

Update: Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 8:05 AM
Daniel:
The caterpillar in the first image is not a Prominent moth, but a Leafwing butterfly (Nymphalidae : Charaxinae). It is a Two-Spotted Prepona (Archaeoprepona demophoon); not to be confused with the One-Spotted Prepona (A. demophon). The name Silverking may be more common in the Antilles. The distribution of A. demophoon is from Mexico to northern Argentina, including the Caribbean. Within that area the genus is broken down into at least 10 sub-species, each with its own fairly distinct distribution. The variety found in Puerto Rico (and apparently nowhere else) is A. d. ramorosum. The ACG site mentioned above has numerous images of A. demophoon caterpillars and adults. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Caterpillars feeding on speckled alder
Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 1:14 PM
Hi!
I really like your website – it’s been very helpful in identifying many of the insects that I’ve found. These caterpillars I’m having a hard time with though. I saw them during the summer, munching on speckled alder leaves on an island in Georgian Bay. As you can see in the photograph, they are yellow, black and white striped, with reddish orange heads and a big reddish bump a little ways behind the head as well. They have several hairs and stiff black spikes along them. Do you know what they are?
Kristin
Georgian Bay, Ontario, Canada

Red Humped Caterpillars

Red Humped Caterpillars

Hi Kristin,
It took us a bit of searching before we were able to identify your Red Humped Caterpillars, Schizura concinna, but we eventually located it on BugGuide where it is described as:  ” has bright red head and red hump over segment A3.  Striping is variable but includes black, yellow and white pinstripes.  Takes up a defensive posture raising the rear end when disturbed. ” This is a Prominent Caterpillar in the family Notodontidae.

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Camo Bug
Sat, Oct 11, 2008 at 1:48 PM
I found this character hiding in a willow tree today. He hooks his tail around like a scorpion in a treatening manner when I stroked his back with a leaf.
Wondering in Waplole
Walpole MA

White Furcula Caterpillar

White Furcula Caterpillar

Dear Wondering,
Your caterpillar is one of the Prominent Moth Caterpillars, most probably the White Furcula, Furcula borealis, based on images posted to BugGuide.

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Do you know what kind of caterpillar this is? They were on our blueberry bush!

Datana Caterpillars on Blueberry

Datana Caterpillars on Blueberry

These are caterpillars in the genus Datana.  Datana major, the Azalea Caterpillar is most likely and they appear to be early instars that will get more colorful as they grow and molt.  You can read more about this species on BugGuide, where it is reported that they are sometimes found on blueberry leaves.  The posture and group grazing of this genus are quite unique.

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unknown caterpillar
We aren’t sure if this came out of our greenhouse or from one of the trees in our yard. It is approximately 2″ long. We live at Moose Pass, Alaska, on the Kenai Peninsula.

This is one of the Prominent Moth Caterpillars, possibly in the genus Furcula.

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beautiful caterpillar
My husband and I found this on a blueberry bush. As soon as we touched the branch, “he” assumed this defensive posture, curling up and emitting a drop of liquid from end back end. It’s a beautiful creature, but what is it? I’m sorry but I wasn’t able to place the photo into this e-mail, other than attaching it. I hope you are able to open the document. Thank you
Sarah, Rolla, MO

Hi Sarah,
Despite being named the Azalea Caterpillar, BugGuide indicates that Datana major can also be found on blueberry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination