Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"

Subject: Need help identifying what bit me
Location: Northeast
September 26, 2015 5:13 pm
Hello Bugman. I was gardening and was bit by the centipede (?) viewed in the attached photo. It was on the underside of a Manhattan Euonymus and attached to the leaf by what appears to be a bright green vest. This happened in East Setauket, New York (located in Suffolk County on Long Island).
I had extreme pain and a burning sensation that traveled up my arm for about six inches.
Can you identify what this is? Thank you for any guidance you can offer.
Signature: Krista

Saddleback Caterpillar

Saddleback Caterpillar

Dear Krista,
You were not bitten, but rather stung by this Saddleback Caterpillar,
Acharia stimulea, a species found in much of eastern North America.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillars are capable of inflicting lasting and painful stings with their spines.”

Subject: Cute bug
Location: Madeira Ialands (porto Santo)
September 27, 2015 5:33 am
Hello
Here is a photo of a large caterpillar bug found in the madeira islands. It’s easily the size of a large finger with cute markings. awww 🙂
I know its probably the caterpillar of a hawk moth, but which one? I would appreciate any more information you might have..
Signature: Thanks

Hornworm

Hornworm of the Vine Hawkmoth

We agree that this is a Hornworm, but we haven’t had much luck verifying the species.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide additional information.

Correction:  A reader provided a comment indicating that this is the caterpillar of a Vine Hawkmoth, and Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic confirms that identification.

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
September 24, 2015 3:38 pm
Found this big ol guy crossing the street headed to our pond. Can’t seem to figure out what he is!
Signature: The Castro Family

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Castro Family,
This magnificent caterpillar is a Banded Sphinx Caterpillar,
Eumorpha fasciatus, and you can compare your individual to this image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Evening Primrose, Oenothera species, Water Primrose, Ludwigia species, and other related plants (Onagraceae).”  Most Sphinx Moth caterpillars pupate underground, and we suspect this large individual stopped feeding and was looking for a good location to dig underground to commence metamorphosis.  This is such a great image illustrating a child’s wonder with the natural world that we have decided to feature your submission.

Thanks for the help!! We spent a Looooooooong time researching and couldn’t find  out what it was!! Interesting that it feeds on water plants! No wonder it was by our pond!!
That’s so cool you’re going to feature our photo! Where can we see it? On your website?
Thanks again for the help! We can complete our nature journal entry! 🙂
Heidi E Castro

Subject: Red caterpillar
Location: VA
September 17, 2015 4:04 pm
Pretty guy crawling in the piedmont of Virginia? What is he?
Signature: Bill

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bill,
This is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar in the genus Heterocampa, and this individual identified as a White Blotched Heterocampa on BugGuide looks very similar, though many other species in the genus also look similar.

Subject: caterpillar on live oak tree
Location: Pender County North Carolina
September 18, 2015 6:59 pm
I noticed that some of my live oak trees had almost all their leaves gone. On inspection I saw several caterpillars eating the leaves. This was in southeastern North Carolina on September 17, 2015.
Signature: Tom Maloy

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Dear Tom,
You are being troubled by the Yellow Necked Caterpillar,
Datana ministra, and according to BugGuide:  “The larvae feed on Malus, Quercus, Betula and Salix species. Young larvae skeletonise the leaves of their host plant. Later, they feed on all of the leaf except the leaf stalk. They feed in groups.”

Thank you so much.  Hope my oaks recover.  I know that the catalpa caterpillars (which to me look similar to these) completely denude the catalpa trees and they come back without a problem-hope my oaks do as well.  At least I can use the catalpa caterpillars for fish bait but didn’t know if I could handle the Yellow Necked Caterpillar safely.
Tom Maloy

Subject: what is this caterpillar?
Location: bemidji, Minnesota
September 13, 2015 7:24 pm
found this little guy and am having a hard time identifying
Signature: jamie

American Dagger Moth Caterpillar

American Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jamie,
This is an American Dagger Moth Caterpillar,
Acronicta americana, and we found a matching image on BugGuide to verify its identity.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of alder, ash, birch, elm, hickory, maple, oak, poplar, walnut, willow and other deciduous trees” and “The caterpillar’s hairs can cause skin irritation.”