Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
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Subject: No clue what this is.
Location: Ontario Canada
August 20, 2015 2:52 pm
We’ve found this guy in our back yard in Ontario Canada and we have no idea what it is.
Signature: Brendon

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Brendon,
This is an Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar, a species that feeds on grape, Virginia creeper and other vines.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: blue horned caterpillar
Location: Glenwood Springs Colorado
August 18, 2015 10:25 am
found this in the parking lot in glenwood springs colorado when my dog sniffed it and reared back then i noticed that it had a horn and was wondering if it was poisonous
Signature: Jeremy

Great Ash Sphinx Caterpillar

Great Ash Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Jeremy,
We have determined that your caterpillar is a Great Ash Sphinx Caterpillar,
Sphinx chersis, based on the images and description on BugGuide which states:  “Larva – greenish or pinkish with seven long diagonal lines sometimes edged with pink. Spiracles elongate, black ringed with white. Horn blue or pink.”  While doing our research, we encountered this blog posting and we have written in with an identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange caterpillar with gray stripes and black horns
Location: Winterville, GA
August 16, 2015 8:48 pm
This was enjoying a leaf on an oak sapling in my woodland garden in the yard this afternoon, August 16th. I hope it’s something native because I left it to eat.
Signature: Stephanie

Spiny Oakworm Moth Caterpillar

Spiny Oakworm Moth Caterpillar

Dear Stephanie,
This is one of the native Oakworms in the genus Anisota, and we believe the closest match we can find on BugGuide is the Spiny Oakworm Moth Caterpillar,
Anisota stigma.  According to BugGuide, the caterpillars feed on the leaves of:  “Oak; also reported from hazel and basswood.”  Your individual appears to be on a willow leaf.  Can you please provide the name of the tree the caterpillar was feeding upon as it does not look like an oak to us. 

Dear Daniel, That is VERY Interesting. Thank you for getting back to me! Ok, the oak tree is a youngster, a little sapling so it’s tough for me to tell but I would say it is in the red oak family…do oaks every hybridize? Don’t they sometimes…it’s hard to tell because it’s young but if I had to guess I’d say maybe a Trukey Oak or a Southern Red oak…or maybe even a hybrid with a water oak or maybe a Laurel oak. I am just very skeptical about it being a willow because I have to acres, and this little woodland section of the yard is what I wouldn’t hesitate to call “dry woods.” I have no bodies of water on my property and all the other things that have sprung up naturally out there (Amer Beauty Berry, White oaks, Willow Oak, Hickory, Serviceberry, Mulberry) are things associated with dry woods I think. I could take some better pictures of the tree tomorrow (and maybe even the caterpillar–she was still there today, and bigger) assuming she’s still out there, if you think that would help. I also live in the part of GA where we have Oglethorpe oaks, for whatever that’s worth.
Thanks for getting back to me!
Stephanie

You do not need to send us images of the tree Stephanie.  You have confirmed that there are plenty of oaks in the vicinity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green insect eggs
Location: Northern Virginia
August 16, 2015 4:48 am
What insect do you think laid these eggs? We found them in Northern Virginia, maybe 10 miles from the Washington Dulles airport. My son is extremely interested in spiders and insects. He (6 years old) can identify stinkbug eggs.
Signature: John Pfaff

Carolina Sphinx eggs on Datura

Carolina Sphinx eggs on Datura

Dear John,
When it comes to identifying immature insect stages for plant feeding species, it is very helpful to know the plant upon which the insects were found.  This leaf looks like it belongs to Jimsonweed or
Datura, and several Hornworms from the genus Manduca feed on Solanaceous plants.  We believe these eggs are those of a Carolina Sphinx, and that they will hatch into Tobacco Hornworms, a species known to feed on the leaves of tomatoes and peppers as well, though Datura and Nightshade are native plant hosts for the species.  This image from BugGuide supports our identification.

Carolina Sphinx Eggs

Carolina Sphinx Eggs

Thanks so much!!  My son is going to be a huge fan of your website.
John

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar/worm
Location: Colfax Ca USA ( Nor Cal, upper foothills of Sierra Nevada Mountain range
August 15, 2015 10:59 pm
Found this guy on our back porch two days in a row. Its sunmer time.He’s about 3 in long. As big around as an average persons pointer finger. Has texture like an oak worm. And this one creepy eye.Seems like some sort of caterpillar. In picture hes hanging over a piece of lattice. Only about 1/3 of his body showing. Any info would be greatly appreciated
Signature: thank you- Walker-Costanzo Family

Probably "tail end" of an Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Probably “tail end” of an Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Walker-Costanzo Family,
We are certain that this is a Caterpillar in the Sphingidae family, and it is most likely in the genus
Eumorpha.  Caterpillars in the family are typically called Hornworms because they have a caudal horn, but the genus Eumorpha is unusual because when the caterpillars mature, they shed the horn, and all that remains is a caudal bump that often resembles an eye.  According to BugGuide, the only member of the genus reported in California is the Achemon Sphinx, and the complete Achemon Sphinx caterpillar looks close enough to your “tail end” view that we are relatively confident the identification is correct, however, three other species in the genus are reported in nearby Arizona.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of grape (Vitis), Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus), Ampelopsis and related vining plants.”  Was there a grape vine near the sighting?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar
Location: southwestern Ontario, Canada
August 15, 2015 6:09 pm
I was very excited to see that the milkweed I planted in my mother’s garden was well-munched, but somewhat surprised to discover who was munching it! Not monarchs, as I hoped for, but a milkweed tussock moth caterpillar. There were four or five of these little guys. When disturbed, they curl up into a ball and drop to the ground. I haven’t seen them in this area before and so this spotting was particularly interesting to me. I know you have lots of tussock moth caterpillar photos already, but thought I would send this along in case you found it useful.
Thanks for such a great site and all your hard work!
Signature: Alison

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Alison,
Your Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar image is of very high quality and a wonderful addition to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination