Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
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ID help
I would like some help with the attached photo. My first thought is its some sort of egg case. I’ve done a lot of searching on the INTERNET and have asked a few knowledgeable friends with no luck. The photo was taken 08/25/2004 in the Charlotte North Carolina area.
Thanks,
Rod

Hi Rod,
You don’t have an egg case, but a caterpillar. It is a Skiff Moth, Prolimacodes badia, one of the Slug Caterpillars. There are several color variations of the caterpillar, but this site has a photo that closely resembles yours. The caterpillars which can be found from July through October feed on cherries, oaks, and many other woody plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

New pics
Hey Daniel,
I have a couple specials for you to add to your archives. I seem to be getting better at my photos. The unknown bug was
found in a drift fence array in West Texas, and none of the researchers could figure out what it was. Can you?!
Wendy A.

Hi Wendy,
The Green Sphinx Caterpillar is probably a member of the genus Eumorpha, formerly Pholus. Notice how the head is retracted into the thoracic portion of the body as well as the absence of a caudal horn. We entertain the possibility that it most resembles Eumorpha pandorus in its green form, but the abdominal spots do not appear to be ringed in black in your photo. This is a caterpillar that comes in both a brown and green form. We love your photo of a Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar, Battus philenor. Most photos online show black caterpillars with red fleshy spines. We might be wrong, but we believe there is a red form as well. Your photos really are great.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

WTB,
Great site, I’m hooked! I found this amazing creature in Dauphin Co. PA last week in a remote valley area. It was on a type of “bush” fern surrounded by mountain laurel and many other types of ferns in the forest. I know it’s a Sphinx but which one; Laurel, Wild Cherry, Blinded Sphinx? Speaking of blinded, I’m color blind and could use some help here…
Thanks,
chris updegrave

Hi Chris,
I believe you have the larva of the Apple Sphinx, Sphinx gordius. I looked up many websites to find an image that matched your photo, and finally located this site with an image of a parasitized caterpillar that looks like yours. At first I thought your Sphinx had no caudal horn, then I noticed it behind the leaves. It is very distinctive. Though called the Apple Sphinx, the food plants include are apple (Malus), sweetfern (Myrica), Carolina rose (Rosa carolina), blueberry and huckleberry (Vaccinium), white spruce (Picea glauca), American larch (Larix laricina), and alder (Alnus). As you can see, fern is on the list.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can You Identify This Caterpillar?
Hi Bugman!
We have a butterfly garden, and I was just surprised to discover about 20 of these hairy orange, black and white caterpillars feeding on some plants out there. They’re small as caterpillars go — about 3/4″. I tried to find some like these on the internet, and I couldn’t, but in the course of trying I did find my way to your great website. Naturally, I’m curious to what these are (and I don’t plan to hurt or move them). Can you assist us in identifying them?
Thanks!
Cathy Whitt
Washington, DC

Of course we can Cathy,
You have Milkweed Moth Caterpillars, Euchaetias egle. The caterpillar is distinctive and unforgettable. This is a common insect, ranging from the Atlantic to the Mississippi and beyond. The caterpillars feed on plants in the milkweed family. The adult moth is creamy white-winged tiger moth with a yellow body. The body has black spots.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello Bugman,
My wife found this really awesome caterpillar a few days ago on her Gerber Daisies. I have been looking all over the Internet trying to identify it, when I stumbled across you site. It looks like someone has asked you about a particular “Saddleback Caterpillar”, and that seems to fit the description of the picture I’m sending you now. Is that what this is? Thanks for your help!
Gray Benton
Iron Station, North Carolina

Hi Gray,
Yes, indeed, you have a Saddleback Caterpillar, Sibine stimulea. Beware those poisonous spines. They can cause quite a bit or irritation. Holland writes: “Nettles are not to be compared in stinging power to the armament of this beautifully colored larva.” Thanks for the photo and I’m so glad our site was helpful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

My son found this near our home in Croydon Pa. What is it?

Your son found a Polyphemus Moth, Antheraea polyphemus, caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination