Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"

Subject: what is this caterpillar?
Location: London
August 15, 2015 7:53 am
Hi I found this in my garden in London. What type of caterpillar is it and will it become a butterfly or moth?
Thanks
Signature: n/a

Vapourer Caterpillar

Vapourer Caterpillar

This is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar and we believe it is the Vapourer, Orgyia antiqua, based on this image on UK Moths.

Subject: Catapillar ID
Location: Abilene, Texas
August 14, 2015 5:17 pm
I found this on my flame grape which is beside my tomatoes. I have always had tomato hornworms but this is very different. First year I’ve seen this one. Earlier in the week I believe I found the mature version sitting atop the fence. It was a very very pale green with little to no markings and its head was retracted into its body. Unfortunately I did not get a pic of it..
Signature: Charlotte Rhodes

Early Instar Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Early Instar Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Charlotte,
Like your Tomato Hornworms, this is also a Sphinx Moth Caterpillar in the family Sphingidae, but it is in the genus Eumorpha.  We believe, based on its similarity to this BugGuide image, that it is an early instar Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar.  We only have images of mature Achemon Sphinx Caterpillars on our site, and they do feed on grape.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae may be tan or green, with white diagonal elongated/segmented spiracular spots from A3 to A7. “Horn” on tail end is lost after the fourth instar. Pupates in burrows in the soil.”

Thank you so much.  I looked it up and the adult pic I saw did look like the one I had on the fence. Feel free to use the pic I sent on your site, I did take it. Glad I found your site, will be visiting it often.
Charlotte

Subject: PA caterpillars
Location: Lancaster, PA
August 13, 2015 7:58 pm
Hi! I have never seen this caterpillar before and I’ve lived in Pennsylvania all my life. I couldn’t find a similar photo anywhere on the Internet. Hoping you can solve the mystery. Thanks!
Signature: Jennifer

Camphorweed Cucullia

Camphorweed Cucullia

Dear Jennifer,
This is a Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar in the genus Cucullia, and in our opinion, it closely resembles this Camphorweed Cucullia,
Cucullia alfarata, pictured on BugGuide.

You are amazing!  Many thanks.  Interesting how very colorful caterpillars can become very dull looking months.
Keep up the great work!
Thanks again,
Jennifer

Subject: Catapillar
Location: South central New York state
August 14, 2015 8:19 am
Found crawling up th side of a house. 5 inches long and 1 inch wide. Beautiful yellow and blue spikes.
Signature: Bart

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bart,
This beauty is a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar, and many folks would argue that the adult Cecropia Moth is even lovelier.

Subject: pink caterpillar w front spine dorsal chevron
Location: 49°08’58.11″ N 123°10’26.48″ W
August 11, 2015 4:47 pm
My wife found this walking on paving in our back yard in Vancouver, British Columbia. May have arrived on new plants brought from nursery. We have looked at every single caterpillar pic on the web (feels like) but have failed to see anything even close. It doesn’t want to eat or spin a cocoon, but we’re hoping it will pupate so that we can see what emerges. But in case it doesn’t, we’re hoping you can tell us what it is.
30mm long (sorry for not including scale in photo)
Signature: Pierre van Aswegen

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Good Morning Pierre,
This is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar in the family Notodontidae, probably in the subfamily Heterocampinae.  We have not had a chance to do a more thorough search for its species identity, but we are posting the image in the meanwhile.  Many caterpillars turn pink just prior to pupation, and the color is not necessarily diagnostic.  See BugGuide for possibly genera in the subfamily.

Subject: Larvae on Milkweed leaves
Location: Haldimand County
August 12, 2015 12:05 pm
These little guys.., about a third of an inch long, had eaten several Eastern Milkweed leaves into skeletal tubes.. they seem to live in a colony on the underside of the leaves and are covered in their own webbing.. I want to know if they are predacious on the Monarch Larvae.. The Monarchs are truly struggling here in Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada..
Signature: Bill from Heaven Farm

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar Hatchlings

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar Hatchlings

Dear Bill,
We believe these are early instar Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars, and you can compare your image with this image from BugGuide.   Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars feed on milkweed, as you observed, and we do not believe they pose any threat to Monarch Caterpillars.