Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oahu Caterpillar
Location: Pearl Harbor, Oahu, HI
July 31, 2015 10:38 am
I can’t figure out what this caterpillar is, I’ve seen several on google that are close, but not exactly the same, the closest match I’ve seen was a caterpillar that’s indigenous to Europe.
I live on Oahu and this guy was hanging out on my fence- I only noticed him because my dog kept trying to eat him.
Any help would be great!
Signature: Deanna H.

Unknown Hornworm

Hornworm

Dear Deanna,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  According to the Sphingidae of Hawaii page, there are 13 known species in Hawaii, and your caterpillar does not match any of the images on the site, though several species do not include caterpillar images.  It is possible that this is a newly introduced species since many plants and animals on Hawaii are not native.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide any information.

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
Agrius cingulata with reduced brown along the diagonal stripes.
Please see if I can get permission to post.
Bill

Update from Bill Oehlke:  August 28, 2016
Daniel,
I would not like to say that George is wrong. It could be Blackburn’s
Sphinx, but I still favour A. cingulata. For me I would have to see the adult
to make a final, totally confident judgement.
Unfortunately I do not think that is possible. Maybe over the next several
years someone else will capture a similar specimen, put it in a jar to
pupate and then will photograph the adult moth.
I look for blackburns to have a much darker anal horn, but perhaps that is a
variable feature.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pink & green horned caterpillar
Location: Colorado
July 29, 2015 3:43 pm
Well hes mostly green and pink on top, his face is scary looking haha. He has a spike or horn on his tail side. He dosnt have anything else. No spots or stripes. I wanna take a pic with him on my face but im scared hes poisonous. Please hurry haha and i probably wont check my email if that applys at all.
Signature: idk

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Waved Sphinx Hornworm

Dear idk,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and we believe it is a Waved Sphinx Hornworm,
Ceratomia undulosa, that has turned pink as a sign it is preparing to pupate.  See the image on the Sphingidae of the Americas site, scrolling down.  It is not poisonous, and we eagerly await the image of you posing with this juicy guy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID Stinging Slug Caterpillar, MD, USA
Location: Northern Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
July 25, 2015 5:09 pm
Can someone ID this caterpillar found this week in northern Baltimore County, MD, USA? It was found on a winterberry holly bush (Ilex species). I suspect that it’s a stinging slug caterpillar of some kind, but I can’t find a species that that matches the coloration.
Signature: K Smith

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Dear K Smith,
The coloration of the Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar,
Euclea delphinii, appears to have considerable variation.  This image from BugGuide is quite close to your individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Central Victoria, Australia
July 24, 2015 7:54 pm
Hi, just curious about what this little guy might be – and I do mean little – I could barely see him with the naked eye. It is maybe 3mm long, and was found on a gum leaf, with what MIGHT have been eggs embedded in the leaf. Or not. Thanks 🙂
Signature: Ann Jeffree

Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ann,
This is a Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar,
Doratiphora oxleyi, one of the Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae.  Many members of this family have stinging spines and there is a really nice image on FlickR.  You can read more about the Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “Each shield bears four tubercles. Yellow stinging hairs are protruded from these when the Caterpillar is disturbed. These fold into triangular pockets when the Caterpillar is relaxed.  Along the sides of the caterpillar are fleshy spikes, like a skirt. There is also a flap covering the head. The spikes are translucent, and can be reddish or yellowish. The front pair are especially likely to be red. The caterpillars move like slugs because their legs are reduced.  The caterpillars feed on a variety of: Gum Trees.”  Though we have no shortage of family members on our site, your image is a new species for our archives.

Thanks very much for your reply Daniel. I’m pleased to have been able to send
you a new family member for your files. I will look out for a Painted Moth in
the Spring and see if I can add further to your database.

🙂 Ann

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: we found sonething
Location: in the backyard in blackpool lancs uk
July 21, 2015 12:28 pm
My son found a bug and we don’t know what it is. We would like u to look at our picture and let is know what it is please.
Signature: normal

Puss Moth Caterpillar

Puss Moth Caterpillar

Dear normal,
Thanks an image on FlickR, we were able to identify this Prominent Moth Caterpillar as
Cerura vinula, the Puss Moth Caterpillar.  According to UK Moths:  “Named after the cat-like appearance of the adult moth, this species is fairly common throughout most of Britain.  The striking caterpillar feeds on aspen (Populus tremula) as well as poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.). When disturbed, it raises its head and waves the twin tails, which have pinkish extendable flagellae.”  This species should not be confused with the North American Puss Moth, which is in a different family, the Flannel Moths, but we embarked upon our identification based on the resemblance your caterpillar has to the North American Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the genus Heterocampa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these?
Location: Elwood, IL
July 13, 2015 6:10 am
I found these caterpillar/larva on my dill and am not able to identify them. Can you help? I have swallowtaill caterpillars on my dill and am hoping these won’t kill the caterpillars.
Signature: Penny

Unknown Caterpillars on Dill

Purple Carrot Seed Moth Caterpillars on Dill

Dear Penny,
We are still working on this identification.  The internet is filled with Black Swallowtail Caterpillars feeding on dill, but we are having problems identifying your caterpillars.  They remind us of the Sophora Worm, but we cannot find any record of them feeding on dill, their diet being confined to members of the legume family.  We suspect this is some species of moth, and we don’t believe you need to worry about them killing Swallowtail caterpillars.

Update:  15 July 2016
A special thanks to Jennifer who after nearly a year provided us with an ID for the Purple Carrot-Seed Caterpillar, Depressaria depressana, in the Twirler Moth superfamily Gelechioidea, which represents a new subcategory for our site.  Jennifer also provided a BugGuide link where it states this introduced species and:  “The larvae feed on plants in the parsley family, mainly the flowers and unripe seeds. Hosts include coriander, dill, carrot (Daucus carota), anise (Pimpinella), fennel, caraway, cumin (Cuminum cyminum), celery, parsley, parsnip (Pastinaca), and cow-parsnip”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination