Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larvae on Milkweed leaves
Location: Haldimand County
August 12, 2015 12:05 pm
These little guys.., about a third of an inch long, had eaten several Eastern Milkweed leaves into skeletal tubes.. they seem to live in a colony on the underside of the leaves and are covered in their own webbing.. I want to know if they are predacious on the Monarch Larvae.. The Monarchs are truly struggling here in Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada..
Signature: Bill from Heaven Farm

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar Hatchlings

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar Hatchlings

Dear Bill,
We believe these are early instar Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars, and you can compare your image with this image from BugGuide.   Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars feed on milkweed, as you observed, and we do not believe they pose any threat to Monarch Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars
Location: Minnesota
August 9, 2015 8:42 pm
Found this on our Apple tree her in Minnesota. He was munching on a leaf. It was a little fatter than my thumb and about 3 inches long.
Signature: Cindy

Cecropia Caterpillar

Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Cindy,
This is a Cecropia Moth Caterpillar, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow.  may also feed on lilac and tamarack.”  The adult Cecropia Moth is a magnificent creature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large green catapiller
Location: waukesha wi
August 5, 2015 5:34 pm
found this guy munching away on my tomato plants. He cleaned a few branches bare so I relocated him. Roughly 3 inches long, 3/4 wide.
Signature: Wi gardener

Tobacco Hornworm

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Wi gardener,
This is a Tobacco Hornworm,
Manduca sexta, one of two species of related caterpillars that are frequently found feeding on the leaves of tomatoes and related plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID request
Location: upstate NY
August 4, 2015 7:59 am
Hello my name is Jack and I live in upstate NY. A few days ago my niece found what seems to be a catipillar but I am not sure. My niece and I attempted to find it on the Internet bit we had no such luck. So if you have any idea what type of bug this is my niece and I would gratefully appreciate it. Thank you
Signature: Jack

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jack,
This Luna Moth Caterpillar can be distinguished from the very similar looking Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar because, according to BugGuide:  “Larva lime-green with pink spots and weak subspiracular stripe on abdomen. Yellow lines cross the larva’s back near the back end of each segment (compare Polyphemus moth caterpillars, which have yellow lines crossing at spiracles). Anal proleg edged in yellow. Sparse hairs.”  The large size and pink coloration indicates that this is probably getting ready to pupate, which it does in a cocoon loosely spun around a fallen leaf.  Because of your northern location, the cocoon will pass the winter and the adult Luna Moth will emerge in the spring.  BugGuide indicates:  “One brood in the north, May-July. Three broods in the south, March-September.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ?
Location: On a vanilla plant
August 4, 2015 12:25 pm
Found an interesting looking Catapillar on my patio- my enclosed patio – during recent heavy downpours in Central Florida – Zone 9B
He may have come in accidentally on some other plant I was moving around I am very familiar with butterfly caterpillars and some swings moth caterpillar’s but I can’t put my finger on what this is there are no Morance I touched him he’s very smooth didn’t exhibit any need anything as far as touching him
Signature: From Jenny

P.S.  Not swings Sphinx
And he was very smooth

Probably Hornless Hornworm

Unknown Caterpillar

Dear Jenny,
We believe, but we are not certain, that this is a hornless Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae.  Are you certain this is a vanilla orchid?  It looks to us like a
Hoya, a plant with milky sap, related to milkweed in the family Apocynaceae.  We tried to identify your caterpillar on the Sphingidae Larvae of Miami-Dade County, Florida site, but with no luck.  It is possible this is a tropical introduction that has not yet been reported in Florida, and it is also possible that this is an unusual color form of a more common species.  Several hornless caterpillars in the genus Erinnyis are listed as feeding on plants from the aforementioned family.  Caterpillars in the genus Eumorpha are also hornless.  We are contacting Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide any information on this critter’s identity. 

Probably Hornless Hornworm

Unknown Caterpillar

Bill Oehlke Responds
I do not recognize it as a Sphingidae species.
I think it belongs to another family

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big found in Southern Indiana
Location: Southern Indiana
August 3, 2015 5:26 pm
This bug was found in a friends garage. There were several around. And if you bothered them, they would roll up into a ball and then later unroll and crawl off. It was a fluffy looking little fella about one inch long.
Signature: June bullock

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar

Hi June,
Is there milkweed growing near the garage?  This is a Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar,
Euchaetes egle, and they are never found far from a milkweed food plant.

Thank you for such a quick response.  My friend will be happy to know this little fellow has a name. She was showing it to everybody trying to find out what it was.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination