Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"

Subject: Caterpillar crawling on playground
Location: Viroqua, WI 54765
September 10, 2015 7:05 am
On Sept. 8, 2015 I encountered this fuzzy caterpillar crawling on the children’s playground equipment. Location was the City Park, Viroqua WI 54665. The pic was taken at approx. 5:30 pm. Please help me identify it. Also, can it sting children who may find it while playing?
Signature: Angela Karwoski

Our Automated Response
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can.

Thank you!  I appreciate your efforts regardless if you are able to identify my submission.  I have referred to your site several times to find out various information.
I submitted this time due to my concern for the kids who play on that playground equipment so frequently.
I think it’s time I make a donation thinking back to how many times I have found it a very valuable resource.  Thanks for sharing your knowledge, it’s very much appreciated.

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Angela,
Thanks so much for your kind words.  We are nearly certain this is a Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota tessellaris, based on its resemblance to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on alder, ash, birch, elm, hazel, hickory, oak, poplar, tulip tree, walnut, willow.”  There is no mention of utricating hairs.

Subject: Never saw a caterpillar this large before!
Location: Front yard on the grass
September 11, 2015 9:16 pm
It’s huge! What species is this? Are the poisonous? Very cool little dude!
Signature: -Ashley

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ashley,
This is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar.  Normally, our “location” field is used to identify a city, state, country or continent where the critter was sighted.  Interestingly, there is not a blade of grass in your image, despite the location being listed as “Front yard on the grass.”

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Tucson AZ
September 10, 2015 11:59 am
I work at a dog kennel and I have I have found a lot of them out in my dog runs I Just want to make sure they are not poisonous.
Signature: Jonathan

Hubbard's Silkmoth Caterpillar

Hubbard’s Silkmoth Caterpillar

Good morning Jonathan,
This is a pre-pupal caterpillar from a moth in the genus
Sphingicampa, formerly Syssphinx, and we suspect it is most likely a Hubbard’s Silkmoth, Sphingicampa hubbardi, though another species, Sphingicampa raspa, is also found in Arizona.  According to BugGuide, the Hubbard’s Silkmoth:  “Larvae feed on Wright’s acacia, honey mesquite and catclaw acacia.”  They are not poisonous.

Subject: blueberry defoliator
Location: Jaffrey, New Hampshire
September 10, 2015 8:37 pm
One of my blueberry bushes had a bunch of these
Signature: Doug

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Dear Doug,
Your caterpillar is
Schizura concinna and it goes by the very descriptive name Red Humped Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”  Interestingly, we have not found any other mention of Red Humped Caterpillars feeding on blueberries.

Thank you Daniel!  That was a bunch of very impressive caterpillars and they finished the job on that poor blueberry.

Subject: Dark Hornworm
Location: Lake Ann Michigan
September 9, 2015 1:16 pm
Found both the normal green hornworm and the almost black one on 8/17/14 just 3 miles south of the Village of Lake Ann, Michigan. zip code 49643.
The darker one was much more aggresive, vibrated and emitted an odd noise when handled even slightly.
Found a total of 4 that year.
Signature: Bryan Black

Tobacco Hornworms:  Dark and Light Morphs

Dark Tomato Hornworm and Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Bryan,
Though they were both probably feeding on Tomato Plants, your two Hornworms represent different species in the same genus.  The dark Hornworm is a dark morph of a Tomato Hornworm,
Manduca quinquemaculatus, and the green Hornworm is a Tobacco Hornworm, Manduca sexta.  It is very curious that the Tomato Hornworm was the more aggressive of the two.

Subject: fanged moth caterpillar!
Location: southern Michigan
September 8, 2015 9:29 am
This is one scary-looking dude! Take a look at those “fangs” and that defensive posture!! Can you tell me what it is? A friend of mine found it in southern Michigan in July, and asked me to share it with anybody who might help identify it. Big thanks for everything you guys do!
Signature: LM – Michigan

Cutworm

Cutworm

Dear LM – Michigan,
This is a Cutworm in the subfamily Noctuinae, but we are uncertain of the species.  Though we believe it is not the Caterpillar of a Yellow Underwing, we think you should see the similarities to the head on this individual posted to BugGuide.  The terminal prolegs are especially distinctive.  You can try browsing BugGuide for a more specific identification.

Cutworm

Cutworm