Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large brown and white caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Pretoria, South Africa
Date: 04/05/2021
Time: 05:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good day, can you please tell me what the name of this caterpillar is and what its moth looks like? It’s the first time ever I’ve encountered such a caterpillar on my property. The photo was taken at mid day in late summer. I have found a few iStock photos of the same variant, but it unfortunately doesn’t identify the caterpillar.
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Anette

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Anette,
This is a more uncommon color variation of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Acherontia atropos, a caterpillar that is more typically bright yellow and green.  The markings on the body of the adult moth are thought to resemble a skull, hence the common name Death’s Head Hawkmoth.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much for your reply.
It is much appreciated.
Kind regards,
Anette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Guateng, South Africa
Date: 04/20/2020
Time: 05:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there.
I found this in our garden this morning and would like to know if you have any idea on what exatly it is please
How you want your letter signed:  Any way the bug xpert likes

Hornworm of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth

Dear Any way,
This is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth.  Hawkmoth caterpillars are commonly called Hornworms.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of caterpillar?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tucson, AZ
Date: 02/12/2020
Time: 08:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this giant caterpillar near my garage in October.  I’ve never seen one so big. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Erica

Pre-pupal Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Erica,
We believe your Hornworm is a pre-pupal Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar,
Manduca rustica, based on images on the Sphingidae of the Americas and BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Dallas Texas Area
Date: 01/06/2020
Time: 01:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this guy on one of my Vitex bushes this Fall.  He is 3″ long. What is he going to be?
How you want your letter signed:  Clueless in Dallas

Hornworm: probably Manduca florestan

Dear Clueless in Dallas,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Sphingidae.  Thanks for providing the food plant.  When we searched for Sphingidae caterpillars that feed on Vitex, we found this posting for
Manduca florestan on Wikipedia, and we then checked on Sphingidae of the Americas where we found images that appear to match your individual.  Manduca florestan is listed as a stray in Texas.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to verify our identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A Different Kind of Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Lexington, Massachusetts USA
Date: 10/14/2019
Time: 03:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I spotted this unique guy while walking my dog this morning.  Could you please identify him for us?
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Tracey Hynes

Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Tracey,
We identified this Hornworm from the family Sphingidae as the Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles gallii, thanks to images on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Varition of Morocco horned caterpillar color
Geographic location of the bug:  Closest to Erfoud, Morocco
Date: 10/08/2019
Time: 10:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello BugMan! I wanted to show you this variation in color of the (perhaps) Barbary Spurge? Hornworm.(OR tell me the exact ID; I see some with two dots!) We found these while riding camels in Erg Chebbi sand dunes on the vegetation shown. We gently tickled one and put him on a leaf to better photograph. Then we put him back on leaves. There were LOTS of them! They can make their way quite fast over the sand when looking for another bush! I took the photos on September 26, 2019. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Cynthia S.

Hornworm from genus Hyles.

Dear Cynthia,
This hornworm is definitely from the genus Hyles, but we cannot be certain of the species.  It does look most to us like the Barberry Spurge Hawkmoth caterpillar pictured on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination