Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gorgeous Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  East Central Indiana Winchester
Date: 09/18/2018
Time: 03:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
I found this guy in the parking lot of my office. We are located near a small creek with some brush. I was hoping you could help me identify this bug!
How you want your letter signed:  Ann

White-Lined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Ann,
This is just one of several different color variations of the Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar.  You may see other color variations here and here.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Denver Colorado
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 05:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any idea what kind of bug this is? I’m 99% sure it is a caterpillar, but can’t find a similar one online. It is definitely a creature of some sort, it moved when I tried to pick it up.
How you want your letter signed:  Robin

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Robin,
This is a third instar Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar, and here is a matching image from BugGuide.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “L3: At this stage, the larvae look quite different. The long straight horn now curves and looks strikingly similar to a
Parthenocissus quinquefolia tendril. The larvae can be yellowish, green, brownish or reddish with 5 white eyespots around the spiracles on the sides of the larvae.”  Your individual has not yet shed its caudal horn.

Correction:  Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar
Thanks to a correction from frequent WTB? contributor Bostjan Dvorak, we acknowledge our initial mistake.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Superior, Arizona
Date: 09/15/2018
Time: 07:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen crawling on a path in Boyce Thompson Arboretum
How you want your letter signed:  Lucy Lancaster

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Lucy,
This is a Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar, a species with several color morphs, including a dark variant we just posted.  Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars are prove to periodical population explosions, especially in areas of the arid Southwest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Southeastern South Dakota
Date: 09/15/2018
Time: 09:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What kind of moth will this become?  Is the caterpillar dangerous to my flowers?
How you want your letter signed:  Susan

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Susan,
This is a Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar, and the adult Whitelined Sphinx is often confused for a hummingbird when it visits blossoms during the crepuscular time of day.  Most caterpillars feed on leaves and they do not do appreciable damage to plants unless they are quite numerous and the plant is already stressed due to other factors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Niagara Ontario area
Date: 09/04/2018
Time: 11:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This caterpillar was hanging on my tomato plant with all these white things on it.
Next morning it was on the ground with most of the white things off of it.
How you want your letter signed:  Pina

Dead Tobacco Hornworm with Braconid Pupae

Dear Pina,
This Tobacco Hornworm or Carolina Sphinx is quite dead, but while it was still alive, it was parasitized by a Braconid Wasp.  When the wasp larvae hatched, they feed on the non-vital tissues of the hornworm until they were ready to leave the host and pupate.  The white things are the Braconid pupae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Friendsville, TN
Date: 08/26/2018
Time: 09:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was pulling weeds and uncovered this guy under a root ball(mostly crabgrass). The white side wiggled a bit, I turned him over with a stick to get a photo of his belly. He’s about the size of an adult finger, any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  DugABug

Tersa Sphinx Pupa

Dear DugABug,
Do you have a
Pentas vine nearby?  This is the pupa of a Tersa Sphinx moth, Xylophanes tersa, and the Tersa Sphinx caterpillars are frequently found feeding on Pentas.  Though the pupal state is generally thought of as an immobile period of metamorphosis, many pupa are quite active, as you witnessed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination