Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar eating Morning Glory
Location: Victoria, TX
April 22, 2017 6:14 pm
Hi bugman been a long time fan and have always found your site useful and informative. We have a butterfly garden and love insects. We also do not exterminate and plant sage with our tomatoes. etc. Something ate an entire wall of morning glory and we finally found one. There may be many culprits, (we get excited) but our collection of field guides did not identify him. I appreciate your help and we are so excited about him. Thank you for your knowledge. God bless and we love your site.
Signature: Kristy Mower

Pink Spotted Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Kristy,
This Hornworm is the caterpillar of a Pink Spotted Hawkmoth,
Agrius cingulata.  According to The Sphingidae of the Americas:  “Larvae feed on plants in the Convolvulaceae family, especially Ipomoea batatas (sweet potato) and in the Solanaceae family, especially (Datura) (jimsonweed) and related plants in the Americas. “ 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Caterpiller
Location: Adelaide south Australia
April 12, 2017 7:06 am
Found this in a nature reserve behind our house in Seacliff (near Adelaide) Australia. Any idea what this is?
Signature: Stuart Snyder

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Stuart,
This is a Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hippotion celerio.  We just posted a green individual this morning.  According to Butterfly House:  “This Caterpillar occurs world-wide. It can occur in several different colour forms: green, brown, red or dark grey. It usually has an eyespot each side of the first and second abdominal segments, those on the first segment being larger.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Renmark South Australia
April 10, 2017 8:38 pm
Hi I found this caterpillar in my grapevine today. I’ve not seen anything like it. Could you tell me what sort is it and is it harmful to us?
Regards
Signature: Fiona

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Fiona,
Cultivated grape is one of a list of plants on Butterfly House that serve as larval food plants for the Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hippotion celerio.  The Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar is not dangerous to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green bug with long nose?
Location: Western Australia
April 3, 2017 5:40 am
Found in Geraldton, Western Australia. Really curious to find out what it is!!
Signature: Corma

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Corma,
This distinctive Hornworm is a Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hippotion celerio, which we identified on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “This Caterpillar occurs world-wide. It can occur in several different colour forms: green, brown, red or dark grey. It usually has an eyespot each side of the first and second abdominal segments, those on the first segment being larger.”  The eyespots may act as protective mimicry if a predator mistakes a tasty caterpillar for a larger threat, and the Caterpillar’s behavior, as explained on Butterfly House, supports that:  “When disturbed, the caterpillar curls into the shape of a letter ‘C’, tucks its head under its thorax, and expands the segments with the eyespots. No doubt these distract and deter possible predators.”  Since this species has such a wide range, it is known by different common names in different locations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified sphinx moth caterpillar from Indonesia
Location: Seminyak, Bali
March 15, 2017 3:01 pm
When I was visiting Bali, I found 3 of these caterpillars feeding on an unidentified bush. I took one of them with me to rear as I travelled. It grew very quick and turned a brown colour in its final instar. When I was in java the following week I found the same plant with the same caterpillars on it. I walked past the plant in the evening and saw a hummingbird like hawkmoth fluttering over the leaves depositing eggs. If you need more pictures I have documentation of every instar. Thankyou/ Joey
Signature: Joey Twomey

Hornworm

Dear Joey,
We haven’t the time to research your query this morning, but we are posting your image nonetheless.  Perhaps Bostjan, who frequently identifies Hornworms for us, will recognize this individual.  Knowing the plant upon which it was feeding would be a tremendous clue in ascertaining its identity.  We would love to post a few more images.

The name of the food plant was Morinda citrifolia.
Joey Twomey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Lined Sphinx Moth?
Location: Nevada, USA
February 28, 2017 6:38 am
Would this be a cocoon or pupae?
My neighbor found it in her garage so I placed in a protected outdoor plant, just barely covered with soil. I live in Las Vegas, NV & it’s Feb 28, with currently 45degree lows. I’ve seen many White Lined Sphinx Moths around here so I’m guessing that’s what I have. Did I do the right thing with it? I’ve also included a photo of a tree in my yard which has white flowers that remain open at night. There are also many wild Primrose plants growing in the desert near me.
Signature: Renee Rhodes

Manduca Pupa

Dear Renee,
This is definitely a Sphinx Pupa, but is it not that of a Whitelined Sphinx.  Your individual has a “handle” that is the casing for the proboscis and that detached casing is absent in the Whitelined Sphinx Pupa that is pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas.  We believe your individual is from the genus
Manduca that contains at least two species that feed on the leaves of tomato plants and other related plants in the family.  See images on Things Biological and Russell Labs.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination