Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Cyprus
Date: 09/14/2017
Time: 09:32 AM EDT
I noticed this rather large caterpillar in southern Cyprus and just wanted to know what type it is and wether it will become a butterfly or a moth. It had yellow circles going down the sides of its body and was smooth with no hairs. It also had a little spike at the rear end.
How you want your letter signed:  Jo-Ann

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jo-Ann,
Though your camera angle is not ideal for identification purposes, we are able to barely view the caudal horn indicating this is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  Based on your description and location, and that the plant it is feeding upon appears to be a grape vine, we believe this is a Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar, and Project Noah includes an individual sighted on Cyprus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna moth and sphinx catepillar
Geographic location of the bug:  North texas
Date: 09/12/2017
Time: 04:46 PM EDT
My son and I just found these two less than a foot away from each other. I think we have the names right but I’m not sure.
How you want your letter signed:  Breanna Fouse

Four Horned Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Breanna,
Both of your identifications are correct, and we can even provide you with a species for the Sphinx Caterpillar.  Though the common name ignores the caudal horn present in so many Sphinx Caterpillars, the Four Horned Sphinx is also called the Elm Sphinx.  The leaves in your image appear to be elm leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Isognathus leachii
Geographic location of the bug:  Puerto Vallarta
Date: 09/04/2017
Time: 08:59 PM EDT
This is a follow up on “Hornworm eating Plumeria in Mexico“. Attached are some additional images for your website. We are in the middle of the rain season and they are almost on every plumeria.
How you want your letter signed:  JM

Hornworm: Isognathus leachii

Dear JM,
Thanks for providing additional images of the
Isognathus leachii Hornworm.

Hornworms: Isognathus leachii

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Price, Utah
Date: 09/04/2017
Time: 12:44 PM EDT
My Daughter found this caterpillar in my yard and she wants to know what kind of moth or butterfly it turns into.
How you want your letter signed:  Janice Leavitt

Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Janice,
Though your camera angle has produced foreshortening of the caudal horn, we are confident we have correctly identified this Hornworm of a Waved Sphinx,
Ceratomia undulosa, because the stripes and their position relative to the circular breathing holes known as spiracles matches images on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  “Larvae prefer ash but do well on privet and lilac.”  Do you have a nearby ash tree?  The adult Waved Sphinx is a large brown moth with pretty markings.

I am not sure if my tree is an ash or not but I do have a lot of lilac.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big caterpillar!
Geographic location of the bug:  Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania
Date: 09/03/2017
Time: 08:43 PM EDT
Spotted this big guy by the lake on our evening walk tonight. I’m interested to see what this caterpillar becomes!
How you want your letter signed:  Liz

Catalpa Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Liz,
We are surmising that there is a catalpa tree or cigar tree nearby as that is the food plant for the Catalpa Sphinx caterpillar you found.  We have no images on our site of the adult Catalpa Sphinx, but you can see images on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pandora Sphinx?
Geographic location of the bug:  NW Ohio
Date: 09/02/2017
Time: 10:48 AM EDT
We found this guy in NW Ohio and it was pretty big! Cruising by some grapevines, look forward to knowing what it is?!
How you want your letter signed:  The Kings

Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Kings,
The backlighting on your image of this Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar is quite beautiful.  Leaves from grapes are an identified food plant on BugGuide where it states:  “Larva: body bright green or reddish-brown with swollen third thoracic segment into which head and first 2 thoracic segments can be drawn; abdomen with small white to yellow spot on segment 2 and large oval spots around spiracle on third to seventh segments; whiplike horn of early instars replaced with button in last stage; thorax and anterior abdominal segments with dorsal black spotting.”  Thank you for including a detail image of the “button” or caudal bump.

Caudal Bump of Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination