Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  #dargle, kzn
Date: 01/30/2018
Time: 05:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This caterpillar is in my garden. Can you tell me what caterpillar it is please?
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks Tania

Thank you but I managed to find it eventually on the net.  It’s an oleander hawk moth.

Pre-Pupal Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Tania,
Thanks for informing us that you identified your Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar.  The yellow coloration and its location on the ground indicate it is pre-pupal, and about to undergo metamorphosis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of caterpillar is it
Geographic location of the bug:  Ballito south Africa
Date: 01/04/2018
Time: 01:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please could you let me know what type of caterpillar it is and are they poisonous it is about 10 cm long and as thick as a pork sausage
How you want your letter signed:  Very interested

Spiny Hornworm: Lophostethus dumolinii

Dear Very Interested,
When we first posted images of this Spiny Hornworm Caterpillar,
Lophostethus dumolinii, back in 2011, it proved quite the challenge to identify.  We sought the assistance of Bill Oehlke with the identification.  At that time, we couldn’t locate any matching images online. We now found a matching image on Aylestone 8:  Biodiversity on my Farm and there is also an image on African Moths.  Hornworms, the caterpillars of Hawkmoths in the family Sphingidae, are not poisonous or venomous, and despite a sometimes fierce appearance, they are harmless to humans.

Spiny Hornworm: Lophostethus dumolinii

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wierd cocoon thing?
Geographic location of the bug:  Broulee NSW Australia
Date: 01/24/2018
Time: 11:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in a pile of raked up leaves in the middle of summer. The top part that seems to be segments was twitching back and forth when disturbed.
How you want your letter signed:  Kell

Probably Hawk Moth Pupa

Dear Kell,
This pupa will eventually become a very large moth.  We do not believe it is in the family Saturniidae.  We suspect it is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  Moths in this family do not spin cocoons.  They produce a naked pupa like the one you found, and it is generally underground or among leaf litter.  Many Sphingidae pupae are pictured on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Maungaturoto
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 07:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Heya this big dude just bout ended up squished this morning and we have never seen anything similar???!!!
How you want your letter signed:  Toni Pool

Convolvulus Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Toni,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth from the family Sphingidae, and though a dorsal view is not ideal for identification purposes (a lateral view shows more details) the red caudal horn should help in identification.  We found only two species from the family represented on the Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research site, and the caterpillar of the Convolvulus Hawkmoth,
Agrius convolvuli, pictured on Butterfly House looks like a very good match.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Rizal, Philippines
Date: 01/18/2018
Time: 01:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help me identify the exact genus and species of this caterpillar.
How you want your letter signed:  Kaye

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Kaye,
Most of the Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillars,
Daphnis nerii, on our site are more mature, indeed many are pre-pupal.  Thanks for sending an image of an earlier instar that has a longer, more delicate caudal horn.  You can find a similar looking image on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic.  As the name indicates, the larvae of the Oleander Hawkmoth feed on the leaves of oleander.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Honaunau Hawaii
Date: 01/17/2018
Time: 07:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Do you know what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Sharon

Pink Spotted Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Sharon,
This Hornworm is a Pink Spotted Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Agrius cingulata, and you can find similar images on the Sphingidae of Hawaii page.

Pink Spotted Hawkmoth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination