Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar on Virginia creeper
Geographic location of the bug:  Georgetown County, SC
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 07:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I observed this caterpillar on my Virginia creeper  October 26-November 2, 2017.  I’m wondering if it could be a hydrangea Sphinx.
How you want your letter signed:  Sybil Collins

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Dear Sybil,
This is the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and it is feeding on a Virginia Creeper.  We quickly identified it as a Virginia Creeper Sphinx or Hog Sphinx, Darapsa myron, thanks to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “freshly-emerged larvae have a slender yellowish body, relatively large brown head, and disproportionately long black anal horn; mature larvae have a green or brown body with a white stripe along the side smudging downwards into diagonal stripes. Head and anterior thoracic segments slender in mature larvae (body swells greatly at third throacic segment, as in Azalea Sphinx). Spiracular spots small and orange, edged top and bottom with white dots. Horn granular.” 

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a sawfly and harmless
Geographic location of the bug:  Parramatta
Date: 04/12/2018
Time: 05:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I found this eating my gardenia plant last night. Is this bug harmful to people.  Should I be concerned about dealing with the big as a garden pest?
How you want your letter signed:  Jen

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jen,
This is not a Sawfly.  It is a Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar and it will eventually become a diurnal moth that is sometimes mistaken for a bee, hence its common name.

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Australian Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Queensland, Australia
Date: 03/30/2018
Time: 09:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this large caterpillar on a vine bush just curious as to what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Anonymous

Hornworm: Gnathothlibus eras

Thanks to Butterfly House, we quickly identified this Hornworm as Gnathothlibus eras, the Aussie White-Brow Hawkmoth.  Butterfly House states:  “When disturbed, the caterpillar curls its head down onto its first two pairs of legs, and displays the third pair. The caterpillar can also exude liquid from its mouth, and has even been heard to give a squeal.”  Listed food plants include Grape vine and Sweet Potato Vine.

Hornworm: Gnathothlibus eras

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Death’s Head Hawkmoth
Geographic location of the bug:  Pretoria East
Date: 03/29/2018
Time: 04:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think I have identified this large and beautiful caterpillar found on a gooseberry bush in my garden today.   I just thought I’d share the pic for those interested.
How you want your letter signed:  Andrew Bleeker

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Andrew,
Thank you so much for sending in your gorgeous image of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Omg what is this and where did it come from
Geographic location of the bug:  Mittagong NSW  Australia
Date: 03/27/2018
Time: 08:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It’s the beginning of Autumn
Surrounded by privet trees
Several veggie gardens
Southern Highlands region of NSW
Nearly stepped on this thing at 4am in morning on my lounge room rug
Never seen anything like it
Realise it’s a grub of some kind
Put it in container
What should I do with it
Keep or let go
Will it damage my veggies
Does it turn into a butterfly or moth or something
Please help ASAP
Don’t want to leave it in container to die if it needs to finish it’s life cycle but don’t want it damaging my veggie gardens
How did it get here
No one I’ve asked had ever seen one before
My niece thinks it may be a type of horn worm
Please help
How you want your letter signed:  Freaked me out – sarah

Hornworm: Psilogramma casuarinae

Dear Sarah,
Your niece is correct.  This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  We identified it on Butterfly House as
Psilogramma casuarinae, a species with no common name, thanks to this additional image.  Butterfly House has a list of food plants including olive, privet and jasmine, and the site also indicates “The caterpillar grows to a length of about 8 cms. When the caterpillar is fully grown, it leaves the food plant and walks up to 20 metres to pupate under the soil.”  Because of the pink coloration, we are surmising that your individual is pre-pupal,  and we suspect it might have already begun to transform.  You can return it outside to an area where it can dig underground.  It will not continue to feed at this time and it will not eat your veggies.

Hornworm: Psilogramma casuarinae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need ID on chrysalis
Geographic location of the bug:  Austin, Texas 78717
Date: 02/25/2018
Time: 05:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,  I’m in Austin Texas and was cleaning up my butterfly garden today when I found this on the ground… any idea what it may be?
How you want your letter signed:  Lori in Austin

Tersa Sphinx Pupa

Dear Lori in Austin,
Do you grow
Pentas in your butterfly garden?  This looks like the pupa of a Tersa Sphinx and the caterpillars feed on Pentas.

I do (did, before winter) have pentas in my garden! Thank you!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination