Currently viewing the category: "Hornworms"

Subject:  Big bug, hot for limes
Geographic location of the bug:  Los Angeles, California
Date: 07/19/2021
Time: 06:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this fella on my lime tree, just cruising around.
Taken June 7th.
How you want your letter signed:  Bug curious

Hornworm looks like Carolina Sphinx

Dear Bug curious,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the Sphingidae family, and it appears to be a Carolina Sphinx which is pictured on BugGuide.  The Carolina Sphinx feeds on the leaves of tomato, pepper and other solanaceous plants and not the leaves of a lime tree.  Do you have tomatoes or other related plants nearby?

Hi Daniel.
The plants nearby are a laurel tree, a rosemary plant, and a Portuguese blood orange tree.
About 50 feet away are some habanero plants, so maybe that’s it.
No tomatoes.
Basil? That’s not far away either, about 50 feet in another direction.
Steve

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Winnipeg, Mb
Date: 06/16/2021
Time: 03:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this caterpillar with a blue/green/white colouring and dark green bands with an orange spot on its back. Can’t find the species anywhere!
How you want your letter signed:  Lauren

Abbott’s Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Lauren,
This is a Caterpillar of an Abbott’s Sphinx Moth,
Sphecodina abbottii, and you can verify that by comparing your individual to this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae start out green with a horn on the final segment. Middle instar larvae are whitish to blue-green with dark faint cross-stripes and the horn replaced by an orange raised knob on the last segment (A8). The last instars may be either brown with a “wood-grain” pattern or brown with ten pale green saddles along the back. In these late instars the knob resembles an eye.”

Subject:  Large brown and white caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Pretoria, South Africa
Date: 04/05/2021
Time: 05:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good day, can you please tell me what the name of this caterpillar is and what its moth looks like? It’s the first time ever I’ve encountered such a caterpillar on my property. The photo was taken at mid day in late summer. I have found a few iStock photos of the same variant, but it unfortunately doesn’t identify the caterpillar.
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Anette

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Anette,
This is a more uncommon color variation of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Acherontia atropos, a caterpillar that is more typically bright yellow and green.  The markings on the body of the adult moth are thought to resemble a skull, hence the common name Death’s Head Hawkmoth.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much for your reply.
It is much appreciated.
Kind regards,
Anette

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Guateng, South Africa
Date: 04/20/2020
Time: 05:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there.
I found this in our garden this morning and would like to know if you have any idea on what exatly it is please
How you want your letter signed:  Any way the bug xpert likes

Hornworm of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth

Dear Any way,
This is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth.  Hawkmoth caterpillars are commonly called Hornworms.

Subject:  What kind of caterpillar?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tucson, AZ
Date: 02/12/2020
Time: 08:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this giant caterpillar near my garage in October.  I’ve never seen one so big. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Erica

Pre-pupal Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Erica,
We believe your Hornworm is a pre-pupal Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar,
Manduca rustica, based on images on the Sphingidae of the Americas and BugGuide.

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Dallas Texas Area
Date: 01/06/2020
Time: 01:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this guy on one of my Vitex bushes this Fall.  He is 3″ long. What is he going to be?
How you want your letter signed:  Clueless in Dallas

Hornworm: probably Manduca florestan

Dear Clueless in Dallas,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Sphingidae.  Thanks for providing the food plant.  When we searched for Sphingidae caterpillars that feed on Vitex, we found this posting for
Manduca florestan on Wikipedia, and we then checked on Sphingidae of the Americas where we found images that appear to match your individual.  Manduca florestan is listed as a stray in Texas.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to verify our identification.