Currently viewing the category: "Bagworm"
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Possibly bagworm, from Zambia
Location: Kasanka National Park, Zambia
December 11, 2011 10:52 am
Hello,
This creature was photographed in Kasanka National Park, Zambia. It was crawling on the hood of a stationary car, possibly fell down from an overhanging bush. Date: May 10, 2011.
Any idea, at least to genus? I’d be grateful. Thanks.
Signature: Monika Forner

Bagworm

Dear Monika,
That is sure one crazy looking Bagworm with its grassy bag.  Bagworms generally create their bags from the foliage of the plants they feed upon.  If you are able to identify the plant species it is feeding upon, it will facilitate a species identification for the Bagworm.

Bagworm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange leaf cocoon
Location: north side of house in Clifton VA (Fairfax)
September 13, 2011 12:51 pm
My husband took this photo today 9/12/11 at our home in Clifton, VA of a strang leaf cocoon located on a column in front of our door. It appears to be made of leaves. Can you identify it?
We have never seen it before.
On our front door I have 2 wreaths made of dry leaves that I think were used for this cocoon. It has been here for a few days.
Thanks much,
Signature: Camille W

Bagworm

Hi Camille,
This is the cocoon of a Bagworm.  Bagworms are caterpillars in the family Psychidae, and they begin to construct a bag from plant material when they are quite small, adding to the bag as they grow.  The Bagworms do not leave their bags, and eventually pupate in them.  Female Bagworm moths are flightless and legless.  The male mates with her inside the bag and she lays here eggs there as well.  The female Bagworm truly never leaves her home.  You may read more about Bagworms on BugGuide.

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unidentified bug
Location: Midwest North America
August 2, 2011 2:53 pm
Hi,
I am from Bradley, IL. It is the beginning of August and we have these little ”pods” or ”pine cone” looking sacks all over our pine tree in the back yard. They have a small ”worm like” animal inside and attach themselves to anything that is stationary. The outside of the ”pod” is camouflaged to match the berries on the tree.
Signature: Thanks, Anna

Evergreen Bagworm

Hi Anna,
We absolutely love that you have documented an Evergreen Bagworm,
Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis (see BugGuide), that has incorporated berries into its bag.  Bagworms are moth caterpillars that use leaves and twigs from the plants that they feed upon to construct a bag that protects them from predators and the elements.  The Bagworm will eventually attach the bag to a stem, fence or wall, seal the bag and pupate inside.  Only male Bagworm Moths have wings.  Females are legless and wingless and they do not leave the bag.  The male mates with an immobile female who then lays eggs in the bag as well. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Stick-shelled beetlepillar
Location: Australia (Sydney Basin)
April 2, 2011 10:50 pm
My daughter found this wandering around my backyard. I’ve seen these before but always assumed they were a cocoon, rather than a sort of shell. This one has been around the backyard for at least a month as I have seen it hanging from trees, then mysteriously vanishing.
I also have video of it checking out the camera
Signature: Carey

Large Bagworm

Hi Carey,
This is a Bagworm in the family Psychidae, and we quickly identified it as a Large Bagworm or Saunder’s Case Moth,
Metura elongatus, on the Brisbane Insect Website.  The caterpillar forms a silken case containing plant material from its food plant that it remains in, eventually pupating inside of the case.  The adult female is wingless and she never leaves her case, using pheromones to attract a mate.  The Butterfly House website has images of the entire life cycle.

Thanks for that, my daughter was fascinated (so was I) to see
photographs of the adult moth.
Cheers
Carey

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Bagworm or boxworm?
Location: Wadi Og, Israel
January 23, 2011 6:22 am
Hi WTB,
On my hiking trip this past weekend I came across this bagworm, Amicta quadrangularis, in Wadi Og, just south of Jericho. I think ’Boxworm’ is a more appropriate name, don’t you?
Signature: Ben, from Israel

Bagworm

Hi Ben,
Thanks so much for sending us your photo as well as identifying this unusual Bagworm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Inseto estranho
Location: Rerião norte do Brasil, Amazônia.
October 23, 2010 4:56 pm
Encontrei este inseto sob a copa de um pé de carambola. Estou na Amazônia, município de Ananindeua, estado do Pará, Brasil. Mês de outubro, verão amazônico. As fotos não estão muito boas. Minha camera, cannon Power Shot A460 está com um problema, com excesso de luz.
Signature: Paulo araujo

Bagworm

Ed Note:  Translation by Google
Strange insect
Location: Rerião northern Brazil, the Amazon.
October 23, 2010 4:56 pm
I found this insect under the canopy of a foot carom. I’m in the Amazon city of Anand, Pará state, Brazil. October, Amazon summer. The photos are not very good. My camera, Cannon Power Shot A460 has a problem with excessive light.
Signature: Paul araujo

Hello Paulo,
This is a Bagworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Psychidae.

Muito obrigado pela resposta.
Abraços.

Translation by Google
Thank you for the reply.
Hugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination