Currently viewing the category: "Bagworm"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Mexico Bagworms
Location: Albuquerque, NM
January 14, 2017 5:19 pm
Greetings,
These bagworm “cocoons” are now very common in the bosque (forest) along the Rio Grande in the area of Tingley Beach in Albuquerque, NM.
They are almost exclusively hanging from the salt cedar AKA Tamarisk on the flood plains adjacent to the river.
Can anyone identify a genus/species for these?
Thanks,
James Hunter
Albuquerque, NM
Signature: James Hunter

Bagworm

Dear James,
Our inability to provide you with a conclusive identification is no reflection on the excellent quality (and aesthetic merits) of your high resolution image.  In the pupal state, many Bagworms look very similar.  We thought that providing a food plant might help with identification, but in attempting to provide you with an identification, the most valuable information we learned on Texas Invasives is that Salt Cedar is an invasive exotic plant, which leads us to believe the Bagworm might not be a native species.

Daniel,
Thanks for your reply.
My very limited research has led me the genus Thyridopteryx; possibly a variation of the species ephemeraeformis.
A quick reference (http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/MISC/MOTHS/bagworm.htm) notes that for host plants:
Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis can feed on over 50 families of deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs. Common hosts include juniper (Juniperus spp.), arborvitae (Thuja spp.), live oak (Quercus virginiana), Southern red cedar (Juniperus silicicola), and willow (Salix spp.) (FDACS 1983). Other hosts include maple (Acer spp.), elm (Ulmus spp.), pine (Pinus spp.), Indian hawthorn (Raphiolepis indica), ligustrum (Ligustrum japonica), and viburnum (Viburnum spp.). One of the authors has received unconfirmed reports of common bagworm as an economic pest of Adonidia palms (Veitchia merrillii) in south Florida (S.P. Arthurs 2016).”
Willows are very common in the Rio Grande bosque, and/or these little guys may have adapted to feeding on Tamarisk.
The map on this page (http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Thyridopteryx-ephemeraeformis) and the detail (http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/sighting_details/917285)  reports ephemeraeformis feeding on a willow in Albuquerque.  The closest other records are in eastern TX, OK and KS.  Perhaps an “invasion” is in progress.
Thanks again.
James C. Hunter, RG

Hi again James,
Thanks for providing all your research for our readership.  We just do not have the staffing to research every posting as thoroughly as you have done.  That is quite a diverse group of food plants for a single species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Have no idea what this is?
Location: Walls and windows
December 4, 2016 5:16 am
I’ve seen these all over my house when I moved to Florida. I’m from Michigan and have never seen these? Please let me know what they are.
Signature: Y. Diaz

Bagworms

Bagworms

Dear Y. Diaz,
You have Bagworms, caterpillars from moths in the family Psychidae that construct a “bag” from silk and plant material from their host plants.  Bagworms live inside the bag and when it comes time for metamorphosis, they frequently leave the plant upon which they have been feeding and anchor the bag to a sheltered location where they pupate.  We suspect these stationary Bagworms are in the pupal state.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar?
Location: Clermont Florida
September 26, 2016 5:49 am
I found this on my window this morning when I opened the blinds. It was on the outside. I went out to look at it and it looks like it is making a cocoon? It looks like tree bark. The pictures were taken in Clermont Florida in September my me. I cannot find it anywhere on line.
Signature: Lynn Albanese

Bagworm Cocoon

Bagworm Cocoon

Dear Lynn,
This is a Bagworm Cocoon.  Bagworms are a family of moths, Psychidae, whose larvae construct “bags” out of plant material, generally the plants upon which they are feeding.  They carry around the bag for protection, and eventually pupate within the bag.  Your individual appears to have pupated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chrysalis on painted Stucco
Location: Hutchinson Isl. , Ft. Pierce, FL
July 3, 2016 6:35 am
We have had these all over the house since last Autumn. None have emerged as of July. Does anyone know what these are?
Signature: Scott

Bagworm

Bagworm

Dear Scott,
This is a Bagworm in the family Psychidae.  Caterpillars begin constructing a bag when they first hatch and the material is from the plant upon which they are feeding spun together with silk.  The Bagworm eventually pupates within the bag, sometimes after securing the bag to a surface other than the tree upon which they were feeding.  You must have a host tree or shrub near your stucco wall.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: On bushes and on the walls(outside)
November 22, 2015 8:52 pm
Hello bug man:
I found this at home here in Florida and I have no idea what is it. There’s a lot of them in my bushes and on the walls and they are eating the leaves. They are destroying my bushes. What should I do?
Signature: By email

Bagworm

Bagworm

This is a Bagworm, the larva of a moth in the family Psychidae. Here is a matching image from BugGuide.   According to BugGuide:  “Larvae (bagworms) construct elaborate little cases around themselves of plant debris and other organic matter.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pinecone-like Cocoon
Location:  Jacksonville, FL
August 27, 2015
Hi Bugman,
Today I found this
2 1/2″ long cocoon on a cedar tree.  It’s a brilliantly designed and constructed little pinecone-like structure. (It also reminds me of a log cabin.)
Would you please identify it for me?
Thank you,
L Welch

Bagworm Cocoon

Bagworm Cocoon

Dear L Welch,
This is the cocoon of a Bagworm, a species of moth in the family Psychidae.  A Bagworm Caterpillar constructs a shelter from silk and bits of the plants upon which it is feeding, enlarging the bag as the caterpillar grows.  The caterpillar never leaves the bag, and eventually pupates inside the bag.  Your Bagworm is in the pupal stage, as it is no longer mobile.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination