Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  asap how to care for this large cocoon in -7 degrees C
Geographic location of the bug:  Toronto (scarborough) Ontario, Canada
Date: 12/08/2017
Time: 07:06 PM EDT
Hello Bugman!  After strong winds here in Toronto Ontario, our puppy found this!  The length of the cocoon is 3 inches.  In a teardrop shape, brown.  What is it and even more importantly:  how do we keep it alive so it can complete it’s cycle?    I have it back outside temporarily in a box….but thought to carve out a spot in a log and then place the cocoon bark over and secure with wire.  There are a few holes in the bark clearly for coming out once metamorphosis occurs.  THANK YOU, Liane and Poème
How you want your letter signed:  nature guardians Liane and Poème

Cecropia Moth Cocoon

Dear nature guardians Liane and Poéme,
We believe this is the Cocoon of a Cecropia Moth, which you can compare to this BugGuide image.  The best way to care for this cocoon is to keep it in conditions with a temperature similar to the outdoor temperature.  If you keep the cocoon indoors, it may cause premature emergence with no chance for the adult moth to mate.  Do NOT create any wire security system that will compromise the adult moth when it emerges.

Thanks Daniel!  The bark has a couple of escape holes, assuming that is for emergence.  For now I have it in a box outside with cocoon side down but not against the bottom of the bot which is folded, and not sealed shut.  I was thinking about using a rotted out log to place the bark  upside down onto the space on the log, creating a little chamber for the cocoon, then place it in our outdoors partially covered structure for protection against the elements like it would have had on the tree.  We have a log pile.
He would be safe in the box but would the log be better?
Liane and Poème
It seems either method would work, but ensure the cocoon doesn’t get either too dry or too damp.

I suspect the box will be dry…I feel like a foster parent!!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar ID
Geographic location of the bug:  North East India , Mizoram
Date: 12/08/2017
Time: 09:06 AM EDT
Hi,
Love this  site and finally have a good bug!
How you want your letter signed:  Gautam Pandey

Indian Moon Moth Caterpillar

Dear Guatam,
Thanks for the compliment.  This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar from the family Saturniidae, and because of its resemblance to the North American Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar and Luna Moth Caterpillar, we are speculating it is in the same tribe, Saturniini.  It might be a Moon Moth Caterpillar, Actias selene, which is pictured on Shutterstock and on FlickR.  An adult Indian Moon Moth is pictured on RockSea.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much!!! Always feels good to put a name on it 🙂
Love the work!!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big hairy orange bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Ohio, USA
Date: 12/03/2017
Time: 09:09 PM EDT
Dear Bugman,
We saw this bug while camping in central Ohio several years ago, and can’t find anything like it and are wondering what it is. It crawled along quite like a snail, but left no trail and had no shell. When it moved the leaf-like formations undulated in a wave-like motion.
How you want your letter signed:  Mary Skrenta

Monkey Slug

Dear Mary,
This is a Caterpillar that is commonly called a Monkey Slug.  They should be handled with caution as they are capable of stinging.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what caterpillars are these
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Cape
Date: 11/29/2017
Time: 06:24 AM EDT
Please help ID.
How you want your letter signed:  andrew

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars

Dear Andrew,
These are Giant Silkmoth Cateperpillars, sometimes called Emperor Moth Caterpillars, but we have not been able to locate a species match.  Perhaps one of our readers will have some luck.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what caterpillars are these
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Cape
Date: 11/29/2017
Time: 06:24 AM EDT
Please help ID.
How you want your letter signed:  andrew

Cape Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Andrew,
The image with a single individual is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar, possibly a Cape Lappet Moth Caterpillar.  We will attempt to identify the group of caterpillars later.

Thanks so much. Yes I also got to the lappet moth group. Great help. The multiple ones looked emperor moth family at first glance but then with the tufted spines it threw me a bit
Thanks so much for the efforts.

We agree that your other caterpillars are from the family Saturniidae, but we want to verify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  red larva
Geographic location of the bug:  Big Bend Nat. Park, TX
Date: 11/29/2017
Time: 10:35 PM EDT
Seen on November 20, 2014 at about 6000 ft. on the Laguna Meadows trail.  About 2 1/2 inches long and 1/2 inch in diameter.  It looked like a gummy worm.
How you want your letter signed:  Dusty

Red Caterpillar

Dear Dusty,
We are pretty confident that this is a Moth Caterpillar, possibly in the superfamily Noctuoidea, because it looks so similar to the caterpillars in the genus
Heterocampa.  Here is a similar looking individual posted to BugGuide.  We will continue to attempt a more specific identification.  Perhaps one of our readers will have a suggestion.

Thanks very much, I have been wondering about what it might be for a couple of years.
You guys have the coolest site!
JD

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination