Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma
Date: 09/26/2017
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
Hi! What is this gorgeous caterpillar going to be?
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy

Io Moth Caterpillar

Dear Cindy,
This is an Io Moth Caterpillar and adult Io Moths are sexually dimorphic.  If this is a female, the adult female Io Moth has brown upper wings and spectacular eyespots on the underwings, while the adult male Io Moth has yellow upper wings and equally impressive eyespots.  Handle with caution.  Io Moth Caterpillars can sting.  Because of the time of year and your location, when this Io Caterpillar spins its cocoon, it will overwinter and emerge in the spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spiky Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  North Vietnam
Date: 09/26/2017
Time: 08:41 AM EDT
Today, we found this caterpillar. Rather, it found us. It stung of us in the head, and hurt like hell. The locals assured us, that it wasn’t dangerous, just unpleasant. What can you tell us about that nasty fellow?
How you want your letter signed:  The three adventurers

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear The three adventurers,
This is a gorgeous image of a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  We will attempt a species identification.  In the meantime, here is an image from Creative Photography that was also taken in Vietnam, but which is most likely a different species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Franklinville, NC in edge of woods
Date: 09/24/2017
Time: 03:41 PM EDT
Would appreciate help in identifying this caterpillar. Its body appears light purple, almost see thru. I’m thinking the pink is its innards. I love bugs and all insects and am curious about this one. It is so distinctive and different colored than most. Appreciate your help. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Lex Bakarich

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Dear Lex,
Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the genus
Heterocampa like your individual frequently change color from green to pink or purple just prior to pupation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Green & Fuzzy
Geographic location of the bug:  Orrick, MO
Date: 09/24/2017
Time: 05:09 PM EDT
@In mid-September, my husband accidentally kicked this guy on the ground. He thought it was some sort of “premature pinecone”. Low and behold, it moved. That’s when we realized that is was some sort of large caterpillar. It almost seemed like it had a hard shell, but I didn’t touch him to find out. We left him on the ground and don’t know what happened to him but still curious as to what it was…
How you want your letter signed:  D&C at Shak Creek

Pre-Pupal Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear D&C at Shak Creek,
This is a pre-pupal Imperial Moth Caterpillar.  Just prior to pupation, many caterpillars change color and search for an appropriate site to commence metamorphosis.  As pupation time nears, the caterpillars become more sluggish.

Pre-Pupal Imperial Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Catepillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Taboga Island, off the coast of Panama
Date: 09/22/2017
Time: 08:49 AM EDT
This specimen was photographed at my parent’s property. I know it is a moth of some type; however, I have searched unsuccessfully for a photograph of an adult specimen to inlude identification.
How you want your letter signed:  Nature Enthusiast

Flannel Moth Caterpillar

Dear Nature Enthusiast,
This is a stinging Flannel Moth Caterpillar,
Megalopyge lanata, and it should be handled with extreme caution.  According to an article on Research Gate:  “Shinney is a colloquial term used to describe a hairy caterpillar in Trinidad and Tobago. There have been at least four instances in 2010 in which people were envenomated by shinneys in the Bon Accord region of Tobago.”

Flannel Moth Caterpillar

This was not Tobago it was Taboga, Panamá, one of the many islands off the coast of Panamá; but, considered part of the country.
I am sure your identification still remains the same.
Thanks!  I will look it up now to find an adult species.  Lots of stinging catepillars in Panamá!

We did catch the difference, however, they are in the same general vicinity and insects don’t respect national boundaries anyways.  Here is a Google Maps image of the area.

I knew that!!  🙂  I had sent those pictures elsewhere and was not satisfied with their identification.
I am confident with yours and quick too!  You certainly know your insects!!
Thanks Again!!

But we didn’t and now we and our readers know the difference and distance between the two islands with transposed letters.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown catepillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Pennsylvania
Date: 09/19/2017
Time: 01:22 PM EDT
Can’t figure out what kind of catepillar this is, can you help?
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Sarah,
This is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar, and the orange color indicates it is pre-pupal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination