Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  weird catapiller
Geographic location of the bug:  south eastern Tennessee
Date: 05/08/2018
Time: 05:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hey found this on my leg fishing and never seen it before what is it? thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Mr Crabtree

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Mr Crabtree,
This is a Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar.  Handle with caution as this species has urticating hairs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Colourful from Australia
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 05:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman, a friend of us found this in Sydney and we have no clue what it is. It’s very beautiful.
How you want your letter signed:  Nexus6

Macadamia Cup Moth Caterpillar:  Mecytha fasciata

Hi,
We’ve solved the mystery :  There is a parent at our school who is an entomologist. It is the caterpillar of the Macadamia Cup Moth ( Mecytha fasciata ). It will turn into a little brown and white furry moth.
Kind regards
Thomas

Dear Thomas,
Thanks for getting back to us.  Of course, though you have provided an identification, we are still posting your image and query because we could not pass up a subject line:  “Colourful from Australia.”  In North America, this family is commonly called the Stinging Slug Caterpillars because many species have venomous spines.
  The Macadamia Cup Moth Caterpillar is also pictured on Australian Nature and Dave’s Garden.  According to Butterfly House “This Caterpillar is green with a yellow stripe down its back. Unusually for this family, it has no tubercles, but is smoothly rounded.”  That is an indication this species does not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black Bristly Caterpillars
Geographic location of the bug:  San Diego, California
Date: 04/24/2018
Time: 03:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, I have been finding these black bristly caterpillars every spring for 3 years in my backyard. They don’t have red or Orange bands so they aren’t Leopard Moth Caterpillars (Which is what ice been calling them). They have pale red/Orange bumps under they’re bristles. I have lots if questions so please write back asap!
How you want your letter signed:  Savannah D.

Probably Painted Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Savannah,
This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, the group that contains the Leopard Moth, though that is an eastern species.  Considering your location, we suspect this is the caterpillar of a Painted Tiger Moth,
Arachnis picta, a species that is quite numerous at our Mount Washington, Los Angeles office.  Alas, our go-to site for identifications, BugGuide, has no images of Painted Tiger Moth caterpillars except newly hatched individuals, however, BugGuide does provide this description:  “Larva – covered in dense black and cinnamon-colored bristles.”  The adult Painted Tiger Moth is a lovely insect that is frequently attracted to porch lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar on Virginia creeper
Geographic location of the bug:  Georgetown County, SC
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 07:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I observed this caterpillar on my Virginia creeper  October 26-November 2, 2017.  I’m wondering if it could be a hydrangea Sphinx.
How you want your letter signed:  Sybil Collins

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Dear Sybil,
This is the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and it is feeding on a Virginia Creeper.  We quickly identified it as a Virginia Creeper Sphinx or Hog Sphinx, Darapsa myron, thanks to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “freshly-emerged larvae have a slender yellowish body, relatively large brown head, and disproportionately long black anal horn; mature larvae have a green or brown body with a white stripe along the side smudging downwards into diagonal stripes. Head and anterior thoracic segments slender in mature larvae (body swells greatly at third throacic segment, as in Azalea Sphinx). Spiracular spots small and orange, edged top and bottom with white dots. Horn granular.” 

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a sawfly and harmless
Geographic location of the bug:  Parramatta
Date: 04/12/2018
Time: 05:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I found this eating my gardenia plant last night. Is this bug harmful to people.  Should I be concerned about dealing with the big as a garden pest?
How you want your letter signed:  Jen

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jen,
This is not a Sawfly.  It is a Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar and it will eventually become a diurnal moth that is sometimes mistaken for a bee, hence its common name.

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified eggs
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kirby uk on crabapple tree leaf
Date: 04/09/2018
Time: 02:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi do you know what these are?
How you want your letter signed:  N medley

Vapourer Moth Eggs

Dear N medley,
These are Vapourer Moth Eggs, and you can verify our identification by comparing your image to the images on Alamy and Alex Hyde Photography.  According to UK Moths:  “An unusual species in many ways, the males fly during the day but are often also attracted to light at night.  The females are virtually wingless, an attribute normally associated with winter-emerging species, but the adults are out from July to September, sometimes October in the south.  The female lays her eggs on what remains of the pupal cocoon, which then overwinter. When hatched, the very hairy caterpillars feed on a range of deciduous trees and shrubs.  The species is fairly common, especially in suburban habitats, over much of Britain, but more so in the south.”

Thank you so much! We’ll leave it alone then, but I suppose we may want to move some of the caterpillars off of our little tree!
best, Nancy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination