Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"

Subject:  Caterpillar eating rhubarb
Geographic location of the bug:  Lancaster, PA
Date: 10/03/2021
Time: 10:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These caterpillars are devastating our rhubarb.    Any idea what they are?
How you want your letter signed:  Joe

Yellow-Striped Armyworm

Dear Joe,
This looks like a Yellow-Striped Armyworm,
Spodoptera ornithogalli, which is pictured on BugGuide.  The Yellow-Striped Armyworm is not listed on the Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook of rhubarb pests, but two other members of the genus are listed.  Armyworms and Cutworms are often general feeders and it is sometimes difficult to get a comprehensive listing of all the plants they will feed upon.

Subject:  Caterpillars id
Geographic location of the bug:  Midwest usa
Date: 10/02/2021
Time: 05:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never seen a caterpillar this big in my life. Is it a danger to my clothing, garden, cats or dogs that may get hold of it? What kind is it?
How you want your letter signed:  stephanie

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Stephanie,
The midwest is a big place.  More location specificity is always desirable.  This is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar and it will not harm your clothing or your cats or dogs.  Imperial Moth caterpillars are not too particular about the leaves they feed upon and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of Bald Cypress, basswood, birch, cedar, elm, hickory, Honeylocust, maple, oak, pine, Sassafras (
Sassafras albidum), Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), sycamore, walnut.”  They do not feed enough to cause a tree damage unless it is a very young tree.

Subject:  Caterpillar ID
Geographic location of the bug:  SW North America (AZ desert)
Date: 09/28/2021
Time: 12:11 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this Sept, 27 early evening in New River, AZ (2,000 ft elevation).  I have not found anything like it in my searches.  The shiny silver barbs on its back come out when agitated.
How you want your letter signed:  DC

Possibly Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear DC,
This is a Silkmoth Caterpillar in the genus
Syssphinx, possibly a Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth Caterpillar.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cincinnati ohio
Date: 09/27/2021
Time: 07:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug fell from a tree at winton woods park onto my car.
How you want your letter signed:  From Pamela Cupp

Monkey Slug

Dear Pamela,
Upon reading your letter, Daniel immediately suspected correctly that you encountered a Monkey Slug.  These stinging caterpillars frequently fall from trees onto cars.

Thank you.  I’d never seen anything like it.  Appreciate your reply.
Take care,
Pamela

Subject:  Large Catepillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Lynnwood WA Late September
Date: 09/21/2021
Time: 05:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Large Lime Green caterpillar. Large cross of brown located at the Anul area.
How you want your letter signed:  Bill

Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bill,
This is a Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar.  The Polyphemus Moth has the greatest range of all the North American Giant Silk Moths, being reported in all 48 lower states.

Subject:  Slug caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Kentucky
Date: 09/20/2021
Time: 12:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I can find several similar slug caterpillars, but none this long that look so much like lichen! Do you know what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Sky

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Sky,
This is not a Stinging Slug Caterpillar.  We believe it is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, possibly the American Lappet Moth which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillars feed on leaves of alder, birch, oak, poplar, willow, snowbrush (Ceanothus velutinus), chinquapin (Chrysolepis chrysophylla), and members of the rose family; larvae rest longitudinally along a twig during the day, and feed at night.”

Thanks for getting back so quick! I hate to question the experts,but are you sure? Because the lappet moth pics look fairly round, although the coloring sure  is similar in some! and you can see feet if you look closely thru the hairs, this thing is weirdly flat and kinda ‘suctioned’ on to the 2by 4

Do you have an image that shows the entire caterpillar?  Your image is cropped and we cannot tell how much of the caterpillar’s body was outside of the edge of the frame.  We do not understand your statement “Because the lappet moth pics look fairly round.”  This image from BugGuide illustrates a Lappet Moth caterpillar at least six times longer than it is wide, and that is not “round”.