Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What caterpillar and moth or butterfly will this be
Geographic location of the bug:  Chapala, mexico
Date: 09/15/2019
Time: 03:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My friend sent me a pic of this caterpillar from Chapala Mexico. After looking online I found hornworm caterpillars. Which one is this and what moth or butterfly does it turn into. Also what is the purpose of the horn?
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah

Unknown Hornworm

Dear Sarah,
We are very confident that this is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae, and that it will eventually transform into a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth, but alas, we have not been successful identifying its species despite the excellent database on Sphingidae of the Americas.  We will write to Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide a species identification.

Bill Oehlke Responds.
Hi Daniel, I think I have seen that one before, but a quick check did not let me come up with an id. Later this afternoon I will send it to Jean Haxaire to see if he knows what it is.
Bill

Daniel,
Jean Haxaire has indicated Isognathus rimosus inclitus.
I wish permission to post it to website. Please check with photographer and forward his or her name.
Bill

Ed. Note:  The subspecies Isognathus rimosus inclitus is pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas, but there is no larval image.  We are writing back to Sarah with the identification and a request from Bill Oehlke to include the image on his comprehensive site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spiky caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  New York State
Date: 09/07/2019
Time: 01:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
This was taken today in New York State.  I’ve searched trying to indenting this one but it has me stumped. Any info would be much appreciated. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Kat

Buck Moth Caterpillar

Dear Kat,
Based on this BugGuide image, your caterpillar appears to be that of a Buck Moth,
Hemileuca maia.  According to BugGuide:  “Caution, caterpillars can inflict painful sting.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  LARGE green caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Middle Georgia
Date: 08/28/2019
Time: 12:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy (girl?) showed up on my patio cover (canvas). It’s about 3 inches long and probably an inch around. (BIG joker). Thought maybe Luna Moth. Some one said maybe Imperial Moth. I know Lunas are endangered and I want to do the right thing. Don’t plan on hurting it or anything just curious about what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in GA

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Curious in GA,
This is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar.  Many Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars from the family Saturniidae and Hornworms from the family Sphingidae pass unnoticed on vegetation while they are feeding.  Fully grown caterpillars then hunt for a suitable place for pupation  They leave the food plant and at that time they are frequently discovered by observant humans.  When we receive images of pre-pupal Imperial Moth Caterpillars, they have frequently turned brown or orange as metamorphosis nears.  Your green individual might still be feeding

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this chunky boy?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Utah, Kane County
Date: 08/22/2019
Time: 01:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I’ve have looked and looked but cannot definitively identify this caterpillar I found a couple days ago. It was in a cottonwood tree. My first thought was a tomato hornworm but the side spots and horn seem too different. Thoughts?
How you want your letter signed:  D. E.

Big Poplar Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear D.E.,
Though this is not a Tomato Hornworm, it is a different species of Hornworm from the family Sphingidae.  We believe it is the Big Poplar Sphinx caterpillar based on the species found Sphingidae of the Americas Utah page.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “Larvae feed on cottonwood and poplar (
Populus) and willow (Salix).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  West Michigan
Date: 08/23/2019
Time: 05:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Curious what kind of caterpillar this is.
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely The Crow

Grapeleaf Skeletonizer Caterpillar

Dear The Crow,
Were you near a grape vine?  This looks to us like a Grapeleaf Skeletonizer Caterpillar, which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I found evidence of a Budworm on My Woody Plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 08/20/2019
Time: 4:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman: Dear Bugman,
I was inspecting the nugs of My Woody Plant when I discovered evidence of Budworms on two colas.  I’ve learned so much since I submitted an image of a Budworm two years ago.  I immediately harvested both and set up a three bowl wash of first hydrogen peroxide in water, second lemon juice & baking soda in water, and finally a water rinse.  While trimming the cola, I discovered a silken chamber with a .3 inch bronze-backed Jumping Spider that I carried back to the garden to the plant I just trimmed, talking to it as it jumped from one hand to the next, back and forth.  Sorry, I didn’t have a camera at the time, so no photo of the spider.  I finished cutting out all the caterpillar fouled portions of two buds, but I never found the caterpillar.  Do you think the caterpillar moved from one cola to the next where it encountered the lair of the Jumping Spider that promptly ate it?  I didn’t want to count on predators to control these dreaded Budworms, so I followed the advice of Mel Frank and promptly sprayed my plants with Bt, a naturally occurring bacteria that causes the caterpillars to stop eating so they eventually die, and it is not a pesticide so it doesn’t harm my predators, like spiders and mantids.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Budworm damage on Cannabis

Dear Constant Gardener,
We will probably catch some flack from some Facebook followers for highlighting another Cannabis posting.  Thank you for sharing your organic Caterpillar prevention strategy as well as your saving a tainted crop strategy.  We found information on The Cannabis Grower that states the Budworm will “burrow into your buds and eat them from the inside. You’ll have no idea they’re even there until you see a bud that looks a little off…one leaf is dying, or the bud looks dried out, somewhat similar to the symptoms of bud rot. If you see this, you must inspect the bud. Take the leaf or bud and pull it away from the plant until you can see all around it. Look for sand-grain sized balls that are black or brown. That’s caterpillar poop, and you have a problem. The good news is that you can usually find the worm by following the poop around the buds until you find the worm or the hole he’s in. The bad news is you MUST find that worm, otherwise he’ll just keep eating and eating into your buds.”  Regarding the possibility that the Jumping Spider ate the Budworm, we suppose that is entirely possible, especially since you did not fine the culprit.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination