Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown egg pod.
Location: Shelby county alabama usa
March 18, 2017 7:26 am
Hello my name is Aaron. I found this particular pod on my porch about 2- 3 months ago. I think it may be of a preying Mantua. I am not sure and would like to know. If from bad bugs. Need info to relocate to wooded area
Signature: Thank you

Tiger Moth Cocoon, we believe

Dear Aaron,
We are pretty certain this is not an egg case.  It looks to us like a moth cocoon, possibly the cocoon of a Tiger Moth from the subfamily Arctiinae.  See this Isabella Tiger Moth Cocoon from BugGuide for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified sphinx moth caterpillar from Indonesia
Location: Seminyak, Bali
March 15, 2017 3:01 pm
When I was visiting Bali, I found 3 of these caterpillars feeding on an unidentified bush. I took one of them with me to rear as I travelled. It grew very quick and turned a brown colour in its final instar. When I was in java the following week I found the same plant with the same caterpillars on it. I walked past the plant in the evening and saw a hummingbird like hawkmoth fluttering over the leaves depositing eggs. If you need more pictures I have documentation of every instar. Thankyou/ Joey
Signature: Joey Twomey

Hornworm

Dear Joey,
We haven’t the time to research your query this morning, but we are posting your image nonetheless.  Perhaps Bostjan, who frequently identifies Hornworms for us, will recognize this individual.  Knowing the plant upon which it was feeding would be a tremendous clue in ascertaining its identity.  We would love to post a few more images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: anisota virgeniensis eggs
Location: winter park, fl
March 9, 2017 5:11 pm
I found a group of eggs outside on the floor which are from the Anisota virgeniensis family. what should I do with them? what do they feed on? how long do they take to hatch? I’m trying to figure out what tree to put them on, what leaves..
Signature: Natasha

Oakworm Eggs

Dear Natasha,
We are impressed that you were able to identify these eggs and puzzled why you did not know the answer to some of your questions once you had an identity.  Your eggs do indeed look like the eggs of a Pink-Striped Oakworm,
Anisota virginiensis, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of oak.”  We suspect the eggs will likely hatch when new growth is sprouting on the oaks.

I had put them on an oak tree, but I wanted to make sure I was doing the right thing because I would’ve been upset if I didn’t. I tend to overthink things and I like to be re-assured of an answer. Thank you for your response.

We are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hairy green caterpillar in Belize
Location: Cayo, Belize
March 3, 2017 2:52 pm
Found this walking “train” of caterpillars today in Cayo, by the Mopan River in Belize. There were like 35 of them, coming down from a tree, each about 5 cm long. The green hair is toxic, got itchy and painful little bumps when I held one.
Signature: Daga

Automeris Caterpillar

Dear Daga,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the genus Automeris, or a closely related genus.  It might be Automeris metzli which is pictured on the Kirby Wolfe Collection, but we are not certain.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide a species identification.  He may request permission to post your images to his comprehensive site as well and we hope you will grant permission.  The procession image is especially interesting.

Automeris Caterpillars

Dear Daniel,
Oh WOW! this is an amazing moth! Thank you very much for responding. Of course you have permission to post the images- I could not find a similar caterpillar on google just searching for green hairy caterpillar Belize…but I came across your wonderful site and actually identified another bug there (fig sphinx caterpillar). There is so many interesting insects here, but caterpillars specially are catching my attention as they transform to something completely different. Thank you very much again!
Daga Rogers

Procession of Automeris Caterpillars

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Lined Sphinx Moth?
Location: Nevada, USA
February 28, 2017 6:38 am
Would this be a cocoon or pupae?
My neighbor found it in her garage so I placed in a protected outdoor plant, just barely covered with soil. I live in Las Vegas, NV & it’s Feb 28, with currently 45degree lows. I’ve seen many White Lined Sphinx Moths around here so I’m guessing that’s what I have. Did I do the right thing with it? I’ve also included a photo of a tree in my yard which has white flowers that remain open at night. There are also many wild Primrose plants growing in the desert near me.
Signature: Renee Rhodes

Manduca Pupa

Dear Renee,
This is definitely a Sphinx Pupa, but is it not that of a Whitelined Sphinx.  Your individual has a “handle” that is the casing for the proboscis and that detached casing is absent in the Whitelined Sphinx Pupa that is pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas.  We believe your individual is from the genus
Manduca that contains at least two species that feed on the leaves of tomato plants and other related plants in the family.  See images on Things Biological and Russell Labs.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Pupa?
Location: Central Virginia
February 24, 2017 5:36 am
Hello, Bugman! Been a big fan of your site for several years now, friend in my Master Gardners group told me about your site. Great work you are doing!
I found this gigantic pupa on the ground after pruning some Mountain Laurel on our mountainside. (We live outside Stanardsville, VA, about 8 miles from the Skyline Drive. THout it was dog poop until I looked closer, touched it and it wiggles! I put it in a big jar and put it back outside on the porch. We are having a few warm days, but expect more cold weather befor Spring arrives (today is Feb.24, 2017). I’ve looked at your photos of the Luna and Polyphemus moths, but mine doesn’t resemble them. What do you think it is?
Signature: Ann P.

Imperial Moth Pupa

Dear Ann,
We believe you searched the correct family, but not the correct species.  We believe this is an Imperial Moth Pupa, and the adult Imperial Moth is a lovely yellow and purple creature.  According to Featured Creatures, one listed host plant is “
Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees    sassafras    Lauraceae” and since the family is the same as Mountain Laurel, that may also be a host plant, though we are having trouble confirming that suspicion at this time.  Perhaps one of the well recognized host plants are also in the vicinity.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of Bald Cypress, basswood, birch, cedar, elm, hickory, Honeylocust, maple, oak, pine, Sassafras (Sassafras albidum), Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), sycamore, walnut.”  You might want to consider returning the pupa to the safety of the leaf litter where you found it, though allowing the adult to emerge in captivity might be a wondrous experience for you.  We would urge you to keep it in a sheltered location not influenced by artificial temperatures.  Thanks for your kind words regarding our humble site.

Thanks for such a prompt response!   I will certainly return the pupa to where I found it.   I’d much rather it have a normal life!  I can now find a photo of what it will become.   Again, thanks for your ongoing hard work and help for those of us who have a love of nature and the wonders around us every day… when we can take a few moments to take a closer look at what we find and have a resource like yours to find answers to our questions.   All best wishes for continued success!  A.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination