Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant caterpillar burrowing under dead leaves
Geographic location of the bug:  Miami, florida
Date: 03/22/2019
Time: 03:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! My students and I found this giant caterpillar traveling down a tree trunk and o haven’t been able to identify it. It’s about 5-6” in length and after it reached the ground it burrowed under th dead leaves in the ground and stayed there.
How you want your letter signed:  Nadia in miami

Fig Sphinx

Dear Nadia,
This large caterpillar is a Fig Sphinx,
Pachylia ficus, and it was on the ground searching for a place to pupate among the leaf litter.  There must be a fig tree near the sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ohhhh
Geographic location of the bug:  ORAN PARK nsw
Date: 03/03/2019
Time: 06:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hay bug man. I’m hoping you can tell me what sort of bug this guy or gal is. Found it out the back today and have never screen one before
How you want your letter signed:  Curious mummy

Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Curious Mummy,
This is a Hornworm, the larva of a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  We are confident it is the Gardenia Bee Hawkmoth Caterpillar which is pictured on Butterfly House and on FlickR.  Do you have a gardenia growing near the sighting?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chrysalis
Geographic location of the bug:  South Florida (Punta Gorda)
Date: 02/19/2019
Time: 03:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There is a group of about 15 of what appear to be butterfly chrysalides, but I have no idea what they are. They are about 3/4 inch long and found on the south side of the house attached to the gutter. The house borders on a canal. I found them on 2/19/19.
How you want your letter signed:  Sharon 1015

Bagworm

Dear Sharon 1015,
This is not a butterfly chrysalis.  It is the cocoon of a Bagworm, a moth in the family Psychidae.  The larvae are known as Bagworms because they construct a shelter, the bag, and they enlarge it as they grow, eventually pupating inside the bag.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fuzzy reddish/orange, black and white caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Dulce, Guatemala
Date: 02/19/2019
Time: 08:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this caterpillar inching along the ground today (feb 19, 2019) and haven’t had any luck figuring out what type it it! I thought maybe in the Tussock family?
How you want your letter signed:  Emily

Shag Carpet Caterpillar

Dear Emily,
This is a very distinctive and impressive looking Caterpillar.  Our first hunch is the superfamily Noctuoidea which includes the Tussock Moths.  We will attempt to provide you with a species identification, and perhaps our readership will be able to provide some information.

Facebook Comment from Karla Thompson
Prothysana felderi.
Shag Carpet caterpillar.

Update
We learned the Shag Carpet Caterpillar is in the family Apatelodidae, the American Silkworm Moths.  According to All About Butterflies:  “The larva of 
Prothysana felderi varies in appearance from instar to instar. It also occurs in various colour forms across its geographical range. Some varieties have a buff or olive ground colour, with tussocks of red setae on the thoracic and anal segments, while others are deep red, with ribbons of black or white setae along the backs.  The larvae feed on Philodendron, Heliconia, Welfia, Aegifila, Chamaedora, Piptocarpha, Pentaclethra, Piper, Stigmaphyllon, Neea, Lycianthes, and Heliocarpus.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa, highveld
Date: 02/19/2019
Time: 09:42 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These are about an inch long, and are aggressively moving through my garden. May be responsible for some painful skin reactions, but unconfirmed. Any idea what they are, and what they’ll turn into?
How you want your letter signed:  Jon

Stinging Slug Caterpillars

Dear Jon,
These are Stinging Slug Caterpillars in the family Limocodidae and we have previously identified them as
Latoia vivida.  Stinging Slug Caterpillars should be handled with extreme caution as they are capable of delivering a painful sting.

Wow, that was fast. Thank you so much!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar eating water hyacinth
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake Hiawassee, Orlando, Florida
Date: 02/12/2019
Time: 02:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Closest I can find is Larva of the arctiid moth Paracles sp.
How you want your letter signed:  Phil

Tiger Moth Caterpillar on Water Hyacinth

Dear Phil,
We believe you might be correct.  We found an Invasive.org posting of
Paracles tenuis and the site states:  “Host:  common water hyacinth” and we are presuming the water hyacinth is the invasive species in question.  iNaturalist lists the genus Paracles in South America.  We don’t find the species listed on BugGuide, so this might be a new North American sighting.  Right now we are being thwarted in our research by a glacially slow internet.  We want to browse all Arctiinae caterpillars on BugGuide before we eliminate any native species.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for the reply and your efforts in this matter. The one I sent you a picture escaped when I wasn’t looking. I found a second smaller one (earlier instar, picture attached) and am continuing to look for others as I am mechanically removing the water hyacinth from the lake as it is an exotic and extremely invasive plant. I will attempt to rear this and any others I find to the adult moth to better secure the identification.
Thanks so much for your help.
Saludos,
Phil
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/lake-hiawassee-slc-yard

Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Phil,
Good luck eradicating those water hyacinths, an invasive plant species from the Amazon.  We wonder if the caterpillars you found are part of a program to help control the water hyacinths with biological methods.  We look forward to any further updated you can provide, including images of the adult moth.

Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Daniel,
I wouldn’t suspect the caterpillar as a means of control. I have found only 5 in an area of 400 sqft and from what I have seen they only sample a few leaves before moving onto another plant.
In addition to my hand removal of the water hyacinth, the city has sprayed a herbicide twice so far killing (and leaving to rot in place) far more than I could hope to remove by hand.
Bit by bit, but is an aggressive plant and dense to the point of killing all plants below it.
Thanks for your help. I will be back if I am successful in rearing a caterpillar.
Saludos,
Phil Wittman
Come look a Cobra in the eye!
www.reptileworldserpentarium.com

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination