Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Siskiyou  county, CA
Date: 07/18/2018
Time: 02:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this little guy crawling through the Oak Leaves in my yard. I’ve never seen one like it.
How you want your letter signed:  Donna B

Mendocino Saturnia Moth Caterpillar, we believe

Dear Donna,
If our identification is correct, we believe this is a Mendocino Saturnia Moth Caterpillar,
Saturnia mendocino, a caterpillar not well represented on the internet.  We located a similar image that we cannot link to, and then we located this image on iNaturalist that looks remarkably like your individual.  According to Pacific Northwest Moths:  “The last instar larva is yellow and has scoli or tubercles covered with orange hair tufts and longer white hairs.  It is illustrated by Miller & Hammond (2003).  Miller & Hammond (2007) also illustrate the young larvae that change dramatically in color pattern with each instar.”  According to Butterflies and Moths of North America:  “Caterpillar Hosts: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos) and madrone (Arbutus menziesii), both in the heath family (Ericaceae).”  Do you have those host plants growing nearby?  We will check with Saturniidae expert Bill Oehlke to verify this identity.  He may request permission to post your image to his site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Death head hawkmoth
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Florida
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 02:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is a picture of the bug I saw in Florida
How you want your letter signed:  Jennifer Bouchard

Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Jennifer,
As we indicated when you commented that you found a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar in Florida:  “We suspect you saw a different related Hornworm that is native to North America.”  Now that you have submitted an image, we can confirm that not only did not not see a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar, we can tell you that you did see a Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar.  There are images on Sphingidae of the Americas to confirm your sighting.  There is a strong resemblance between these two caterpillars from the same family, despite the miles that separate their ranges.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tyria jacobaeae moth caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Silverdale, WA
Date: 07/14/2018
Time: 04:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought you might like a photo of a Tyria jacobaeae (Cinnabar) moth  caterpillar, a species introduced into North America to help keep it’s host plant, Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy ragwort- flower shown  in photo) from over-proliferating.
Tyria jacobaeae is used in conjunction with Longitarsus jacobaeae (the Tansy ragwort flea beetle) for Tansy population control.
Although Tyria jacobaeae will feed on a couple of native plant species, it is my understanding that the frequency of this occuring does not seem to be of concern.
How you want your letter signed:  Bug aficionado

Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bug aficionado,
Thanks for sending us a new image of a Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar and also thanks so much for the informative description.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What the bug ??
Geographic location of the bug:  Asia > Middle East > Jordan
Date: 07/11/2018
Time: 04:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey,
I wonder what this bug is, any thoughts?
P.S : I just found this website, I like what you do hope the best for you guys.
How you want your letter signed:  Moh’d Hawa

Hornworm: Theretra alecto

Dear Moh’d,
Thanks for your kind words.  This is a Hornworm, the larva of a Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  We searched Israel’s Nature Site where we believe we have correctly identified your Hornworm as
Theretra alecto.  We then verified that identification on Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa where the life cycle is nicely documented.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Photo of what I believe is a type of caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Middle Tennessee
Date: 07/11/2018
Time: 01:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this crawler in my fence row on, what I believe to be a morning glory vine. July 11,2018
How you want your letter signed:  Diane

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Diane,
You are correct.  This is an Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar which you can verify on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of grape (
Vitis), Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus), Ampelopsis and related vining plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Clueless!?!?
Geographic location of the bug:  Brazoria County Texas
Date: 07/09/2018
Time: 12:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These little things stick to the interior and exterior of one particular wall of our house. The front wall is where our porch light is and our bathrooms (they tend to be in the bathrooms more than not) but they were all over the place under our exterior shutters when we took them down. They stay stuck on the wall when they die. The “tongue-like” part extends to grab a new spot and it pulls itself up and repeats the process. I see them dead as often or more than I see them alive. Thanks for any insight.
How you want your letter signed:  JA

Case Bearing Moth Larva

Dear JA,
This is a Case Bearing Moth larva, a common household nuisance that will feed on pet hair and other organic materials found in the home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination