Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  some kind of horn worm?
Geographic location of the bug:  Boulder City  Nevada 89005
Date: 05/17/2019
Time: 11:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is not our standard tomato hornworm/sphinx moth but is a different horn worm?
Please help me ID this caterpillar!
How you want your letter signed:  Dr. Merkler

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dr. Merkler,
This is a highly variably colored Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar, a species that is known for extreme population explosions in desert areas following winters of significantly heavy rainfall.  In April, Daniel  saw thousands of dark colored Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars feeding on wildflowers in Joshua Tree National Park.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  In mexico
Geographic location of the bug:  Mexico by Lake Chapala
Date: 05/13/2019
Time: 09:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My mom found this caterpillar and its MASSIVE. Just trying to see if we could figure out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Should we build a caterpillar wall?

Hornless Hornworm is Typhon Sphinx

This is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  Most Hornworms have caudal horns, but some genera and species shed the horn during molting before they reach maximum size.  This Hornworm is in the genus Eumorpha, one genus that characteristically have caterpillars that are hornless Hornworms.  We believe we have correctly identified your Hornworm as the caterpillar of the Typhon Sphinx, Eumorpha typhon, thanks to images posted to Sphingidae of the Americas. where it states:  “larvae feed upon grape species.”  Are there grape vines nearby?  This individual was probably looking for a good place to dig into soft soil to pupate.  According to Butterflies and Moths of North America:  “Caterpillars pupate in shallow underground cells” and “Range: Honduras north through Mexico to southern Arizona.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Denton, Texas
Date: 05/02/2019
Time: 12:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This caterpillar is very thin, about 1 inch long. I found it on some Mystic Spires salvia. I would like to know what it will turn into.
How you want your letter signed:  M. Hector

Possibly Pink Inchworm

Dear M. Hector,
This is an Inchworm or Spanworm in the family Geometridae.  We have received images of pink Inchworms in the past, and we have not been able to provide more than a family identification, including this pink Inchworm from Minnesota in 2009.  We also located an image of a pink Inchworm on BugGuide that is only identified to the family level.  So, the best we can do is provide a family identification at this time.  Moths from the family Geometridae often have a very distinct shape including wings with scalloped edges.  Though it does not answer your question, you might be amused by this 2012 request to identify a pink Inchworm that garnered a Nasty Reader Award.

Unknown Pink Caterpillar on Salvia

Upon further scrutinizing your other images, we cannot even be certain that this is an Inchworm in the family Geometridae.  Do you by chance have a lateral view that shows the legs?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Browns valley, Ca. Near marysville
Date: 05/11/2019
Time: 06:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Last year we found unbelievable amounts of cacoons on surface of everything. Now we have these critters everywhere. What are they, what do they evolve into? Anything poisonous?
How you want your letter signed:  Bret

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Bret,
This is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Orgyia, but we are not certain of the species as there are several very similar looking species that are found in California.  The adults are sometimes called Vaporers.  BugGuide has images of the adult Vaporers as well as the egg masses.  We have gotten several identification requests in the past few days, so we are posting your submission.  According to Featured Creatures:  “The medical importance of Orgyia species caterpillars is well-documented in the scientific (Diaz 2005, Gilmer 1925, Goldman et al. 1960, Knight 1922) and clinical dermatology (Hossler 2009 & 2010 ) literature. Pruritic (itching) dermatitis due to tussock moth caterpillars has been reported to be a problem at child day-care centers and elementary schools in Florida (Atrubin et al. 2012, Atrubin & Granger 2006, Cruse et al. 2007). Contact with the cocoons produces the same symptoms.
The caterpillars may be contacted when they drop from the host trees or when they wander from the trees in search of a place to spin their cocoons. Home owners develop dermatitis from contact with the cocoons while removing them from the soffits of houses. Hairs in the cocoons retain their urticating capability for up to a year or longer.
Most of the urticating hairs are in the dorsal tussocks of the caterpillars (Knight 1922), but a few are also found on the lateral verrucae and intermingled with the black plume hairs of the hair pencils (Gilmer 1925). Gilmer (1925) conducted histological studies of the urticating setae of Orgyia leucostigma and found that each seta has a venom gland at its base. The venom has not been adequately characterized.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Dubai
Date: 04/28/2019
Time: 02:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
Could you please help me figure out what this insect is?
I found it in my backyard.
How you want your letter signed:  Yarib

Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Yarib,
This is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar in the family Lasiocampidae, but we are uncertain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Guava (?) caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  North Queensland, Australia
Date: 04/06/2019
Time: 08:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this large, colourful caterpillar on a guava tree today (Autumn). It is about the size and thickness of my thumb. What is it? What will it become? Is it harmful?
How you want your letter signed:  Connie

Emperor Gum Moth Caterpillar

Dear Connie,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the family Saturniidae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as the Emperor Gum Moth Caterpillar,
Opodiphthera eucalypti, which is pictured on Butterfly House.  According to Butterfly House:  “Cherry Guava ( Psidium cattleyanum )” is listed as a food plant.  The Emperor Gum Moth Caterpillar is also pictured on Jungle Dragon and on the Woodlands Historic Park site.  Another possibility is that this might be Syntherata leonae, a species with no common name whose caterpillars are described on Butterfly House as:  “Later the caterpillars become olive green with a yellow line along each side, and have pink-tipped tubercles each of which has a cluster of short stiff hairs.”  The latter species is also pictured on Aus-Lep.  Neither is considered harmful.  Perhaps someone with more expertise in Australian Saturniids will be able to provide more clarification.

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Matthew Connors, we are concluding that this is Syntherata escarlata.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination