Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown moth Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Middleville,MI
Date: 07/21/2019
Time: 06:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My neighbor kids found this caterpillar today in the grass under an oak tree. It has been very hot here last week.I took a picture of the underside also. I wish it was more clear.
How you want your letter signed:  Kim

American Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Kim,
This is an American Lappet Moth Caterpillar,
Phyllodesma americana, and we confirmed its identification on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillars feed on leaves of alder, birch, oak, poplar, willow, snowbrush (Ceanothus velutinus), chinquapin (Chrysolepis chrysophylla), and members of the rose family; larvae rest longitudinally along a twig during the day, and feed at night” so it was likely feeding on the oak.

American Lappet Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillars eating apple trees
Geographic location of the bug:  Hershey Pennsylvania
Date: 07/20/2019
Time: 03:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these eating my apple tree leaves. What are they?
How you want your letter signed:  Sue

Yellow Necked Caterpillars feed on apple trees

Dear Sue,
We immediately recognized these as Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the genus
Datana, but since we cannot currently access BugGuide for species identifications, we searched the genus name and apple tree and we found the Yellow Necked Caterpillar, Datana ministra, pictured on Discover Life where it states:  “Yellow-necked Caterpillars clustered in a defensive group. When disturbed they flare up suddenly together, rearing their front and hind legs in a menacing ball to help ward off potential enemies. The larvae feed on shade trees in the genera Quercus (oaks), Betula (birches), Salix (willows), and Malus (apple trees and shrubs in the rose family, Rosaceae). Young ones skeletonise leaves; older ones eat whole leaves, except the stems. Once the larvae are fully grown at about 50mm, they drop to the ground and pupate in the soil, emerging as adults the following year. This species, Datana ministra, is in the moth family Notodontidae. Adults are difficult to identify from some other species in the same genus. The species ranges over much of the United States and Canada. While in some areas they are considered pests, they’re a joy to find, watch, and then poke gently with a twig. Boo!”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Upper Peninsula of Michigan
Date: 07/20/2019
Time: 11:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, we found this big caterpillar after some storms last night. We were hoping to find out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy Occhietti

Leafy Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Cindy,
Coincidentally, we just posted additional images of a Leafy Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar, also submitted from the Michigan peninsula.  Do you by chance know Larry?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pink prominent moth caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Windham NH
Date: 07/20/2019
Time: 02:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found the caterpillar here in your pages. I see many different prominent moths. We wondered what moth comes from the specific pink one we found.
How you want your letter signed:  Larry

Pre-Pupal Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Dear Larry,
We just finished posting another pink Prominent Moth Caterpillar.  Like that individual, we are confident your individual is in the genus
Heterocampa, but we are not certain of the species, and we cannot currently access BugGuide, which must be experiencing technical difficulties.  Heterocampa Caterpillars are green, and many turn pink or purple as metamorphosis time nears.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found it
Geographic location of the bug:  Carthage, MO
Date: 07/20/2019
Time: 11:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Knowest caterpillars in my area, but have no idea what this one is. It’s a little bigger around then a pencil.
How you want your letter signed:  Clarissa

Pre-Pupal Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Dear Clarissa,
This is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Heterocampa, and there are several similar looking species.  These Caterpillars are green most of their lives, but when pupation time nears, they often turn pink or purple, so your individual is pre-pupal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Handsome Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern lower peninsula MI
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 09:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this caterpiller eating the Gopher Spurge that’s been growing in our garden. He’s really pretty, and we’re not going to bother him but we would really like to know what kind of moth or butterfly he will become. I cant find anything like it in searches.
How you want your letter signed:  Observer

Leafy Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Observer,
We confirmed the identification of your Leafy Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles euphorbiae, on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  “The leafy spurge hawk moth,  Hyles euphorbiae (length: 2-3 cm, wingspan: 5-7 cm), was the first classical biological agent released against leafy spurge in the United States, with approval for introduction granted in 1965. Populations of this insect are present in several western states, including Montana, Idaho, North Dakota, Wyoming, Minnesota and Oregon, and now Washington (Spokane County). The moth was also introduced from Europe into Ontario, Canada, and then into Alberta where specimens are occasionally still taken. “

Leafy Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination