Currently viewing the category: "swallowtail caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown and white insect
Location: Sydney, Australia
March 3, 2017 5:44 pm
Hi bugman,
8 of these have appeared on my mandarin tree this morning. Are they a danger to it?
We’ve just moved from summer to autumn, and I love right near the central city, if that helps?
Signature: Lee

Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Lee,
This looks like an early instar Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillar,
Papilio aegeus, based on an image posted to the Brisbane Insect site that states:  “The first and second instars larva closely resembles a fresh bird dropping. The larva feed singly on food plants. They usually feed during the day and rest by night on the upper side of leaves.”  The fifth or final instar larva is an impressive caterpillar that will produce a forked, red osmeterium, a defense organ that releases a foul odor that will dissuade predators.  If this is a mature tree, it can handle losing the number of leaves eaten by eight caterpillars, and you will benefit from having adult Citrus Swallowtails flying in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown critter
Location: Galveston, Tx
November 25, 2016 10:24 am
Hi,
No, this is not a stuffed toy! Found this 1 1/2″ critter on my patio in Galveston, Texas 2 days ago. I did not touch it but my neighbor’s young daughter put in her hand and it was crawling around in her hand. Any idea what it could be??
Signature: Lonnie

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Lonnie,
This is a Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar.  The adult Spicebush Swallowtail is a large black butterfly with colorful spots and “tails” on its underwings.

Daniel,
Thank you so much, this was driving me crazy!! Glad to hear it is a butterfly as this is my first year to raise and release the Monarch butterfly.
Thank you again

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth?
Location: Vancouver BC Canada
October 29, 2016 9:56 am
They seem to be stationary over 2 days, they seem not to have even moved
I am an arborist and found them on a young ash tree, could they be feeding on the sap?
They are about 2 inches or 5 cm long and the photo taken in late October 2016
Signature: Richard Lange

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Richard,
This is the Chrysalis of a Swallowtail Butterfly in the genus
Papilio.  Since you are an arborist and you were able to identify the tree, we suspect this is the Chrysalis of a Pale Swallowtail, a species with a caterpillar that feeds on the leaves of Ash and other trees, and that ranges in your area.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on foliage of woody plants in several families: Rosaceae (cherry, e.g., Prunus emarginata, Holly-leaved Cherry, Prunus ilicifolia), Rhamnaceae (California Coffee-berry, Rhamnus californica, Ceanothus spp.), Oleaceae (ash, Fraxinus) and Betulaceae. Overwinters as pupa, adults emerge in spring. Males seek hilltops for mating.”  Based on the BugGuide information, you will have to wait for spring to see the adult Pale Swallowtail emerge.

Thank you so much for your fast reply
Kind Regards
Richard Lange – Tree MD®

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: id this catepiller
Location: central AZ
October 13, 2016 10:28 am
found on an ash tree in central AZ at 5200′
Any ideas?
Signature: ??with love??

Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar

Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar

This is one of the Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillars, and there are several different species with similar looking caterpillars found in Arizona.  Since you were able to provide the food plant, the ash tree, we have determined that this is a Two-Tailed Swallowtail Caterpillar, Papilio multicaudata, and we verified the food plant on Butterflies and Moths of North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catipillar identification
Location: Cape Town
October 14, 2016 2:13 am
Hi there. I have found a few of these on my lime tree. I was wondering what they are and what type of moth/butterfly they will become.
I live in Sunningdale, Cape Town. It’s October now and it’s the first time I have ever seen them.
When touched they produce a forked shaped protrusion from their head and secrete a clear liquid. They are still quite small and I’ve only found three so far.
Signature: Tamlyn

Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillars

Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillars

Dear Tamlyn,
These are Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillars, and there are several species that go by that common name.  We found this matching image on Alamy, but it is not identified to the species level.  
Papilio demodocus is one species called a Citrus Swallowtail, and it is pictured on BioDiversity Explorer, but there are no early instar caterpillars pictured. We also located a matching image on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Monrovia, CA
September 19, 2016 3:00 pm
Hello Daniel,
This is Amy from Amy Oliver’s class. Can you identify this bug?
Signature: Thank you!

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Hi Amy,
It was nice meeting you in the photography class at Glendale Community College.  This is the Chrysalis of a Swallowtail Butterfly in the genus
Papilio.  The Swallowtails produce a chrysalis that is held upright with a silken girdle.  We believe the most likely candidates are Giant Swallowtail, Anise Swallowtail and Western Tiger Swallowtail.  If you could give us some idea of what plants were growing near the sighting, we might be able to narrow down the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination