Currently viewing the category: "swallowtail caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orange Dog
Geographic location of the bug:  Francestown, NH
Date: 10/04/2019
Time: 02:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is in reference to my 2012 post of a Giant Swallowtail Butterfly here: https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2012/08/07/giant-swallowtail-in-new-hampshire
After 7 years finally noticed half a dozen or so on a Gas plant(Dictamnus albus).
How you want your letter signed:  alf

Orange Dog

Dear alf,
Thanks so much for providing documentation of Orange Dogs in your New Hampshire garden seven years after first seeing an adult Giant Swallowtail, a species reported in Vermont on BugGuide, but not in New Hampshire.  According to the Missouri Botanical Garden site, Gas Plant is in the citrus family Rutacea, which is consistent with BugGuide information on larval food plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Never seen this before
Geographic location of the bug:  Mississippi
Date: 08/10/2019
Time: 04:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello I was just writing to you because I was curious as to what this big is never seen it before and can’t find it online.
How you want your letter signed:  Candace

Orange Dog

Dear Candace,
Commonly called the Orange Dog because it feeds on the leaves of citrus trees, this caterpillar will eventually become a Giant Swallowtail.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Electric Caterpillars Eating Parsley
Geographic location of the bug:  Mantaloking, NJ
Date: 08/04/2019
Time: 11:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
These neon caterpillars were enjoying a parsley buffet in a backyard near the bay in Jersey. Wondering what they will be after they transition…
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

Black Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
This is a Black Swallowtail Caterpillar, often called a Parsley Worm or Carrot Worm by home gardeners because of their host plants.  The adult Black Swallowtail is a beautiful butterfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Richmond Va
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 10:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this thing that was crawling on the sidewalk of my kids’ school today?
How you want your letter signed:  Crystal

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Crystal,
This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Swallowtail butterfly.  There are several species in your area, and our best guess is that this is the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail,
Papilio glaucus.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  The adult Eastern Tiger Swallowtail is a gorgeous butterfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Mobile, AL
Date: 06/13/2019
Time: 07:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any idea what this is?   Found on a lemon tree
How you want your letter signed:  Laura

Orange Dog

Dear Laura,
This is the Caterpillar of a Giant Swallowtail, commonly called an Orange Dog.  It will eat some leaves, but it will not negatively affect the health of your tree.  Unless there are hundreds of them or the tree is very very small, the tree can stand to lose a few leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  pink dotted caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  goa india
Date: 06/10/2019
Time: 10:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  HI
my friend noticed this caterpillar.
here’s the photo i took . quite attractive colours.
I suppose it is a stage of a moth or butterfly
can you know what type moth or butterfly it turns into?
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Carlos

Common Mime Caterpillar

Dear Carlos,
This caterpillar is quite colorful, but alas, we have not had any luck with an identification.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Update:  June 11, 2019
Thanks to a comment from Karl, we now know that this is a Common Mime Caterpillar, Chilasa [Papilio] clytia.  According to Butterflies of Singapore:  “Across the range where this species occurs, the early stages feed on leaves of serveral plants in the Lauraceae family. The sole recorded local host plant, Cinnamomum iners (Common name: Clover Cinnamon, Wild Cinnamon), is a very common plant all over Singapore, readily found in nature reserves, gardens, parks and wastelands etc. It is a small to medium-sized tree with 3-nerved leaves. Eggs and early stages of the Common Mime are typically found on saplings at heights from knee to waist level.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination