Currently viewing the category: "Skipper Caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Colorful Ecuadorian caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Silanche Sanctuary, Ecuador
Date: 04/21/2018
Time: 11:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Daniel, et al.
While visiting Ecuador mid-January 2017, I unfurled this Pyrginae  caterpillar from it’s shelter.  Sorry, I don’t know what plant it was on.  I wonder if one of your experts can tell me the name of the skipper.
Thanks much,
How you want your letter signed:  Dwaine

Skipper Caterpillar

Hi Dwaine,
This is a gorgeous caterpillar.  Upon embarking on identification research, we quickly found this very different, but also colorfully striped Skipper Caterpillar on FlickR and another Skipper Caterpillar (
Astraptes fulgerator) from Brazil on FlickR, shot by the same photographer, is an even closer match to your individual.  Despite the color difference, we would not rule out that your individual might be Astraptes fulgerator or another member of the genus.  Caterpillars often change color just prior to metamorphosis, and pink and purple are two colors some caterpillars assume when undergoing morphological changes.  This Biodiversity in Focus article cites the genus Astraptes and DNA identification, and it contains an image of some variability in Astraptes caterpillars based on food plants.  There are also images of Two-Barred Flasher Caterpillars on the North American Butterfly Association of South Texas site.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to see if he can provide any information.

Skipper Caterpillar

Thank you so much!!  That is a wealth of information I did not have.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar/grub id
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Panhadle WV
Date: 01/22/2018
Time: 09:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this little guy/gal outside today I think it may be confused due to warm weather we have been having
How you want your letter signed:  Catherine Hubbard

Skipper Caterpillar

Dear Catherine,
Our initial impression was that this might be the larva of an Elm Sawfly, but then we saw then large head, which leads us to believe this is a Skipper Caterpillar similar to this image posted to BugGuide.  Skippers are classified as butterflies, but they share many of the characteristics of moths.

Skipper Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown caterpillar in Guatemala
Geographic location of the bug:  Tikal, Peten, Guatemala
Date: 01/21/2018
Time: 10:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi
I ‘d be fascinated to know what this caterpillar turns into. Can you help, please?
The pic was taken at 3am on January 6th in Tikal, Guatemala.  The beast in question was on a tree trunk in the carpark, around 50cm off the ground. It was approx. 40 – 50mm long.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Steve

Skipper Caterpillar

Dear Steve,
Our initial thought was that this must be the Caterpillar of a Skipper in the family Hesperiidae because of the shape of the head.  Skippers are butterflies, but they share many characteristics typically associated with moths.  You may scroll down to an image of a Longtailed Skipper on Tortoise Preserve where it states:  “Like other skipper caterpillars, this species has a large head.”  Your individual looks very much like the caterpillar of a Zilpa Longtail,
Chioides zilpa, pictured on Butterflies of America that were taken in Costa Rica, a country with a much greater online database of insects, including butterflies and moths, than does Guatemala.  If our identification is correct, the adult Zilpa Longtail is pictured on the North American Butterfly Association of South Texas site.  We will try contacting Keith Wolfe to see if he can verify our identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identification of 2 caterpillars.
Location: Bangalore , Karnataka, INDIA
December 12, 2014 2:11 am
Dear sir,
I like to photograph nature ,in particular flora fauna around our campus,making it useful for our Bioscience faculty to use it for teaching the students in an excited way.
While doing so i came across 2 caterpillars with strange textures:

2.Second one i will upload in my next mail.
One important thing – These pictures from India – I hope you will be able to accommodate and identify. I am mentioning this because the 2/3 sites where I tried ,INDIA is not on the list of areas to be covered.
Kindly let me know.It will excite the Boys!!
Thanking you.
Signature: Nanda Gopal

Unknown Caterpillar

Giant Redeye Skipper Caterpillar

Hi Nanda,
We are finally getting around to posting your second caterpillar.  We were unable to identify this creature.  It appears to be covered with a substance that is unusual, like the waxy substance secreted by some Lanternflies and by the North American Butternut Wooly Worm which is a Sawfly Larva.

Unknown Caterpillar

Giant Redeye Skipper Caterpillar

Identification courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and Nanda:
The comment from Steve is correct – this is a skipper butterfly (Hesperiidae: Hesperiinae). It looks like a Giant Redeye (Gangara thirsts); click on “Early stages” for caterpillar photos. It is found through most of southern India. Regards.  Karl

Thanks as always Karl.  There is also an image on Butterfly Circle where it states:  “The Giant Redeye is the largest Hesperiid in Singapore. It is very rare and has so far been observed only within the Central Catchment Nature Reserves. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Texas
October 29, 2013 2:07 pm
Found on an oak tree in central texas
Signature: Blake and Brianna

Duskywing Caterpillar

Duskywing Caterpillar

Hi Blake and Brianna,
This looks like a Skipper Caterpillar, more specifically, one of the Duskywings in the genus
Erynnis.  See BugGuide for some photos of the caterpillars.  According to the Butterflies Through Binoculars The West by Jeffrey Glassberg, Oak is a the food plant for the caterpillars of many of the species of Duskywings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Clay City Indiana
June 17, 2013 8:46 am
Found this making a cocoon on a black locust tree. The head is almost separate and lools like two big eyes.
Signature: JS

Skipper Caterpillar

Skipper Caterpillar

I found it in a book by looking up the host plant and checking for pests.  it is a skipper larvae.  Not too interested in which one 🙂  just trying to decide if it was good or bad.
Thanks!!!!!  Love the website as always.
Jana

Skipper Caterpillar

Skipper Caterpillar

Dear Jana,
We are happy you identified your Skipper Caterpillar without our assistance.  Our research indicates it is most likely a Silver Spotted Skipper,
Epargyreus clarus, and BugGuide indicates:  “Caterpillar eats foliage of leguminous plants, including locust trees, wisteria, alfalfa, and stick-tights.”  This is an underrepresented caterpillar on our site and your photos are greatly welcomed. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination