Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

4 bug pix, ID for spider?
Hi!
Sent some of these earlier, but got an error message so I’m trying again. First one is a caterpillar found on my passion flower vine, second one is a katydid in the basil. third is a spider (orb weaver?), the last is my favorite spider picture, great green and brown coloring. Can you ID the last one? Thanks! Love your site, found it when I was trying to ID a scary
bug which turned out to be a Jerusalem cricket.
Donna B.
San Diego

Hi Donna,
Your caterpillar is a Gulf Fritallary, Agraulis vanillae, which feeds on the passion flower. The adult butterfly is a pretty orange with silver spots. It is not a true fritallary.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

New pics
Hey Daniel,
I have a couple specials for you to add to your archives. I seem to be getting better at my photos. The unknown bug was
found in a drift fence array in West Texas, and none of the researchers could figure out what it was. Can you?!
Wendy A.

Hi Wendy,
The Green Sphinx Caterpillar is probably a member of the genus Eumorpha, formerly Pholus. Notice how the head is retracted into the thoracic portion of the body as well as the absence of a caudal horn. We entertain the possibility that it most resembles Eumorpha pandorus in its green form, but the abdominal spots do not appear to be ringed in black in your photo. This is a caterpillar that comes in both a brown and green form. We love your photo of a Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar, Battus philenor. Most photos online show black caterpillars with red fleshy spines. We might be wrong, but we believe there is a red form as well. Your photos really are great.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Well way cool. 🙂 I’ve been to the site you mention, an excellent resource. I note you had a request for a better picture of swallowtail caterpillars. I’ll attach one of my better ones, taken recently. These two are feeding on volunteer fennel in our garden. I’m not positive, but these are likely Black Swallowtail caterpillars. THanks again for the IDs. Wonderful site. Bookmarked. I’ll be back often. I’ll send a separate note with a photo of a click beetle for your collection.
Jim

I’m glad we could be helpful Jim. I don’t know if you have Anise Swallowtails, Papilio zelicaon, in your area. The caterpillars of Black Swallowtails and Anise Swallowtails look very similar. Thanks for the photo. It is pretty great.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I found this on my deck. Can you tell me what it is? I have attached a couple of pictures.

It is the caterpillar of a Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio glaucus. This is a large, graceful yellow and black striped butterfly. The caterpillar is fond of wild cherry and other trees. Those false eyes are meant to scare hungry birds into thinking the benign caterpillar is a ferocious snake.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Help – they are eating my herbs!
Hello Mr. Bugman;
I have thoroughly enjoyed your website; it is entertaining as well as educational. I’ve discovered it this summer and can’t wait to tell our biology teacher at school about this great site. I’m sure to be looking over the identification for this caterpillar, so would appreciate your help. These beautiful, however destructive, critters are munching away at my basil and dill. This is my first year with a small herb garden; I had no idea that I would have such hungry visitors! Would you please identify them for me. Thank you very much (sorry the picture is a little fuzzy),
Sharon
Oneonta , Alabama
( North Alabama )

Hi Sharon,
Thank you for the compliment. You have Black Swallowtail Caterpillars, Papilio asterius. They are called Carrot Worms by some people. They grow into a pretty black butterfly with yellow spots. The caterpillars have the ability to emit two orange horns and a foul odor when provoked. Send us a sharper photo if you can.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

The wild anise was growing nicely in the canyon, and we have noticed the adult Anise Swallowtails flying about, so we decided to look to see if we could find any caterpillars. We found three on one plant, barely 1/4 inch long, and assume they are Papilio zelicaon. We have never seen specimens this small and are unable to locate any photos to see if we are correct. We will keep an eye on them and hopefully document their growth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination