Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cabbage White Caterpillars
Geographic location of the bug: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 12/16/2018
Time: 04:59 PM EDT
In late December, Daniel noticed that the leaves on the wild mustard that was growing in the garden looked as though he had eaten them, but he knew he did not want to begin eating the leaves on such young plants.  When Daniel eats the mustard greens, he generally only picks half the leaf, leaving being the central vein and half a leaf to help the plant gain strength.  These Cabbage White Caterpillars seem to have adapted to eating only partial leaves to minimize the damage to the plant, though still rendering the organic leaves unappetizing to many picky eaters.  Here is a Cabbage White Caterpillar from BugGuide.

Cabbage White Larvae

Cabbage White Larva

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cypress, CA
Date: 12/09/2018
Time: 04:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is currently on my lime tree and not moving.  I thought it was a butterfly but the head looks like a lizard or snake.
How you want your letter signed:  Rita

Orange Dog

That’s ok!  I found it!  It’s a skull caterpillar! A Very cool bug indeed.
Rita
I love that you get so many photos of weird bugs that you cannot answer them all.

Dear Rita,
We are not certain where you found the name “Skull Caterpillar” but we do know that Orange Dog is a commonly used name for the caterpillar of the Giant Swallowtail.  The markings on the Orange Dog, which feeds on the leaves of orange trees and other members of the citrus family, are thought to mimic bird dropping for protection.

Very interesting, thank you:)
I got the term skull caterpillar from a google search.
Sincerely,
Rita

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown chrysalis
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, Ohio
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 04:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So, saw this chrysalis on the outside of a building.  No clue who made it.
How you want your letter signed:  Amber

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Amber,
Most butterflies have a chrysalis that hangs downward from the tip of the abdomen from a silken button spun by the caterpillar, but most Swallowtail caterpillars have an upright chrysalis that is also supported by a silken girdle.  Your chrysalis looks like a Swallowtail Butterfly chrysalis, but we are not certain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chrysalis in SE Michigan
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Michigan
Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 11:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These (2) are in my yard.  The immediate area is a vernal marsh area, with swamp milkweed.  They are not on the milkweed, but it is close by.
How you want your letter signed:  Bill Jones

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis

Dear Bill,
Physically, this appears to be a Monarch chrysalis, however the color is not normal.  A normal Monarch chrysalis is bright green with gold flecks, and as it nears the time for the adult to emerge, the orange wings appears through the exoskeleton.  Your chrysalis appears to have fallen prey to a parasite, probably a Tachinid Fly like the chrysalis pictured on Monarch Lover

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Creepy thing in garden
Geographic location of the bug:  on my citrus dwarf mandarin tree
Date: 10/17/2018
Time: 09:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m assuming it may be some kind of moth maybe? But it looks so reptilian it’s creeping me out. Do you know what this is? Is it a beneficial creature to the garden?
How you want your letter signed:  doesn’t matter

Orange Dog

Dear doesn’t matter,
Please provide us with a “geographic location of the bug.”  According to Sciencing:  “Geographic location refers to a position on the Earth. ”  Other online sources give similar definitions.  While it is helpful to know that it was found on a “citrus dwarf mandarin tree,” we can’t say for certain that this is an Orange Dog, but that is our opinion provided your sighting was in North America.  The loss of leaves from a single caterpillar will not compromise the health of your tree.  The Orange Dog is the caterpillar of a Giant Swallowtail.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pupa identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Canberra Australia
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 05:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Been trying to identify this but coming up with no idea. It looks like a tent caterpillar web but not their pupae…
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

Possibly Pupae of Imperial Jezebel

We wish your image had more critical detail, especially of the individual pupae.  We do not believe these pupae belong to a caterpillar.  We will continue to research this matter, but in the meanwhile, we are posting your request as Unidentified.

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Richard Stickney, we believe these might be the pupae of the Imperial Jezebel or Imperial White, Delias harpalyce, which is pictured on The Victoria Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination