Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown and white insect
Location: Sydney, Australia
March 3, 2017 5:44 pm
Hi bugman,
8 of these have appeared on my mandarin tree this morning. Are they a danger to it?
We’ve just moved from summer to autumn, and I love right near the central city, if that helps?
Signature: Lee

Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Lee,
This looks like an early instar Citrus Swallowtail Caterpillar,
Papilio aegeus, based on an image posted to the Brisbane Insect site that states:  “The first and second instars larva closely resembles a fresh bird dropping. The larva feed singly on food plants. They usually feed during the day and rest by night on the upper side of leaves.”  The fifth or final instar larva is an impressive caterpillar that will produce a forked, red osmeterium, a defense organ that releases a foul odor that will dissuade predators.  If this is a mature tree, it can handle losing the number of leaves eaten by eight caterpillars, and you will benefit from having adult Citrus Swallowtails flying in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar looks like bear
Location: Khon Sawan, Chaiyaphum, Thailand
December 10, 2016 5:09 am
Dear Sir
Found this stuck to a vertical white wall outside our rural house in the shade of an air con unit, today 9th Dec 2016. It rolled up into this tight shape and stayed that way until we put it back and left it. Any ideas what this could be?
Signature: Thanks, Andrew

Chrysalis

Probably Common Rose Chrysalis

Dear Andrew,
Thank you so much for including multiple view of different angles of this Chrysalis.  After the caterpillar stage, butterflies and moths enter the pupal stage and the pupa of a butterfly is known as a Chrysalis.  We feel very confident that this is a Butterfly Chrysalis, and we suspect it is in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae.  We will contact Keith Wolfe who is an expert in the early stages of development of butterflies to see if he recognizes the species.

Chrysalis

Probably Common Rose Chrysalis

Keith Wolfe supplies an identification:
Sawasdee Andrew and Daniel,
This is a Rose (Pachliopta) swallowtail chrysalis, most likely a Common Rose (P. aristolochiae) given its appearance and that species’ widespread abundance in Thailand.  Here is more information from Singapore . . .
http://butterflycircle.blogspot.com/2014/04/life-history-of-common-rose.html
. . . where it outvoted five other candidates last year to become the national butterfly.
Best wishes,
Keith

Chrysalis

Probably Common Rose Chrysalis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identify
Location: Korat.Thailand
December 4, 2016 1:46 am
Found thi caterpillar on a plant in the garden.Have not been able to identify it ,despite trying many sites.Have found one similar but not identical.
Signature: roberthai

Striped Blue Crow Caterpillar

Striped Blue Crow Caterpillar

Dear roberthai,
Based on images posted to Butterfly Circle, Fotolia and Project Noah, we feel confident that this is the Caterpillar of a Striped Blue Crow,
Euploea mulciber.  Butterflies of Singapore has a nice page detailing the life cycle of the Striped Blue Crow.  

Striped Blue Crow Caterpillar

Striped Blue Crow Caterpillar

thankyou.I dont think i ve spotted that one yet.It is certainly a cool  caterpillar.I used to collect butterflies and moths as a boy.Im 67 now
and still find them fascinating.Thankyou once again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown critter
Location: Galveston, Tx
November 25, 2016 10:24 am
Hi,
No, this is not a stuffed toy! Found this 1 1/2″ critter on my patio in Galveston, Texas 2 days ago. I did not touch it but my neighbor’s young daughter put in her hand and it was crawling around in her hand. Any idea what it could be??
Signature: Lonnie

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Lonnie,
This is a Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar.  The adult Spicebush Swallowtail is a large black butterfly with colorful spots and “tails” on its underwings.

Daniel,
Thank you so much, this was driving me crazy!! Glad to hear it is a butterfly as this is my first year to raise and release the Monarch butterfly.
Thank you again

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: monarchs
Location: Westhampton Beach, NY
November 13, 2016 8:47 am
Dear Bugman,
I planted lots of butterfly weed in my yard & had so many monarch caterpillars this year! But now it is cold here in the northeast (east end of Long Island, NY) and I still see some. The problem is, the plants are dying and the caterpillars don’t have much to eat. Is there a way to save the larvae? There is one chrysalis hanging on a dead leaf. You can already see the wings inside. Will this hatch successfully & fly south? Thanks.
Signature: Elaine

Prepupal Monarch Caterpillar

Prepupal Monarch Caterpillar

Hi Elaine,
Alas, we cannot state with any certainty that your soon to emerge Monarch will successfully complete its migration voyage.  In nature’s effort to preserve populations, and because of the uncertainty of weather, insects may continue to reproduce past the time that they would complete metamorphosis before inclement weather begins.  From year to year, that date changes.  Like you, we will hope for the best.  If you cannot feed the larvae on milkweed, we don’t think your existing caterpillars will survive.

Thanks so much for your quick response.  I’ll see if I can find some local “weed” to feed them!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth?
Location: Vancouver BC Canada
October 29, 2016 9:56 am
They seem to be stationary over 2 days, they seem not to have even moved
I am an arborist and found them on a young ash tree, could they be feeding on the sap?
They are about 2 inches or 5 cm long and the photo taken in late October 2016
Signature: Richard Lange

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Richard,
This is the Chrysalis of a Swallowtail Butterfly in the genus
Papilio.  Since you are an arborist and you were able to identify the tree, we suspect this is the Chrysalis of a Pale Swallowtail, a species with a caterpillar that feeds on the leaves of Ash and other trees, and that ranges in your area.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on foliage of woody plants in several families: Rosaceae (cherry, e.g., Prunus emarginata, Holly-leaved Cherry, Prunus ilicifolia), Rhamnaceae (California Coffee-berry, Rhamnus californica, Ceanothus spp.), Oleaceae (ash, Fraxinus) and Betulaceae. Overwinters as pupa, adults emerge in spring. Males seek hilltops for mating.”  Based on the BugGuide information, you will have to wait for spring to see the adult Pale Swallowtail emerge.

Thank you so much for your fast reply
Kind Regards
Richard Lange – Tree MD®

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination