Currently viewing the category: "butterfly caterpillars"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar/grub id
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Panhadle WV
Date: 01/22/2018
Time: 09:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this little guy/gal outside today I think it may be confused due to warm weather we have been having
How you want your letter signed:  Catherine Hubbard

Skipper Caterpillar

Dear Catherine,
Our initial impression was that this might be the larva of an Elm Sawfly, but then we saw then large head, which leads us to believe this is a Skipper Caterpillar similar to this image posted to BugGuide.  Skippers are classified as butterflies, but they share many of the characteristics of moths.

Skipper Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown caterpillar in Guatemala
Geographic location of the bug:  Tikal, Peten, Guatemala
Date: 01/21/2018
Time: 10:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi
I ‘d be fascinated to know what this caterpillar turns into. Can you help, please?
The pic was taken at 3am on January 6th in Tikal, Guatemala.  The beast in question was on a tree trunk in the carpark, around 50cm off the ground. It was approx. 40 – 50mm long.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Steve

Skipper Caterpillar

Dear Steve,
Our initial thought was that this must be the Caterpillar of a Skipper in the family Hesperiidae because of the shape of the head.  Skippers are butterflies, but they share many characteristics typically associated with moths.  You may scroll down to an image of a Longtailed Skipper on Tortoise Preserve where it states:  “Like other skipper caterpillars, this species has a large head.”  Your individual looks very much like the caterpillar of a Zilpa Longtail,
Chioides zilpa, pictured on Butterflies of America that were taken in Costa Rica, a country with a much greater online database of insects, including butterflies and moths, than does Guatemala.  If our identification is correct, the adult Zilpa Longtail is pictured on the North American Butterfly Association of South Texas site.  We will try contacting Keith Wolfe to see if he can verify our identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Can you help me identify this caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Date: 10/28/2017
Time: 09:49 PM EDT
Photographed this tiny dinosaur like caterpillar in the campus of the University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru, India.
How you want your letter signed:  Bug Identified

Common Rose Caterpillar

We were immediately struck by the resemblance your Caterpillar has to the North American Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar, so we decided to research that lead and found images of the Common Rose Caterpillar, Pachliopta aristolochiae, on Wikimedia Commons that look exactly like your individual.  Images of the adult Common Rose are pictured on Butterflies of India.  The entire life cycle of the Common Rose is also pictured on Butterflies of India.

Common Rose Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Common Buckeye, maybe
Geographic location of the bug:  Southeastern New Mexico
Date: 10/28/2017
Time: 05:54 PM EDT
I found this guy flitting around in my yard.  He landed in the grass and posed for several pictures.  I thought he was perfect for fall – brown, orange, cream, along with great eyespots.  Looking on your site, I found the Common Buckeye, they looked like a match.  For all that it is a “common” butterfly, I don’t recall seeing one before.  It looked like your last Common Buckeye submission was from a few years ago, so I thought I’d send it in.
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Common Buckeye

Dear Curious,
We believe this is a Common Buckeye, but according to BugGuide, the similar looking Tropical Buckeye is also found New Mexico.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Query regarding a thingamajig bug
Geographic location of the bug:  IN North India
Date: 10/15/2017
Time: 05:06 AM EDT
I plucked this thing from my mango tree and now I want to know more about it .
How you want your letter signed:  Ayush

Baron Butterfly Chrysalis

Dear Ayush,
This is such a geometrically angular butterfly chrysalis, that we were very excited to attempt to identify it.  Thanks so much for indicating the food plant is mango, because we quickly identified this Baron Butterfly chrysalis, 
Euthalia aconthea, thanks to Alamy.  According to Daily Mail:  “The species is common in Singapore and is usually found on mango tree leaves and is sometimes considered a pest. Eventually, the caterpillar metamorphosizes into a butterfly, via a green, leaf-like chrysalis.”  According to Butterflies of Singapore:  “Eight days later, the pupa becomes considerably darkened, especially in the wing case area, signaling the end of the development of the adult still encased within. The next day, the adult butterfly emerges.”

Baron Butterfly Chrysalis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  New Delhi, India
Date: 10/13/2017
Time: 01:03 AM EDT
Hi we found this caterpillar on a pole in our society. This is October so the weather is slowly turning cool. My daughter is very keen on watching its metamorphosis. But we really need to know what to feed it. Otherwise we will put it back in the garden. So need a quick reply.  Many thanks.
How you want your letter signed —
Mrinalini Singh

Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Mrinalini,
We believe this is the caterpillar of a butterfly in the family Papilionidae, many of which are known as Swallowtails, but we cannot provide anything more specific at this time.  The Butterflies of India site has images of many butterflies from the family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination