Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Decimators
Geographic location of the bug:  North-East Coast of Taiwan
Date: 02/15/2019
Time: 05:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Learn’d Fellows,
Every year at this time, my wild fig, having just sent forth it’s tremulous new leaves, is malevolently machete’d bare by these horned devil mowers. I have transplanted them to a wilder fig. Still I would  like to know my foe. Some deep-leaf sleeper-cells remain. Thanking you, in solidarity, ever-vigilantly.
How you want your letter signed:  Castellano

Common Mapwing Caterpillars

Dear Castellano,
We believe these are butterfly caterpillars from the family Nymphalidae, and that is where we are going to begin our research.  Thanks for providing the host plant.  That is often extremely helpful, and that information quickly produced this FlickR image of a Common Map Butterfly Caterpillar,
Cyrestis thyodamas, and the poster wrote:  “The curious mind must ask, why is this caterpillar like this?  My observational response is that these larvae feed on the new leaves of Ficus trees. Developing shoots appear as tightly swirled red tips at the ends of branches and these caterpillars line themselves up along the axis of open leaves, heads closest to the origin of the leaf, with their spines imitating the fresh foliage that is developing.”  We like the name Common Mapwing which is used on Learn About Butterflies where it states:  “The Common Mapwing is usually encountered singly or in two’s and three’s, in open forest edge habitats. Males are often seen on gravel roads or along pebble-strewn river beaches, where they bask in full sunlight while imbibing mineralised moisture. They are initially nervous and difficult to approach but once they start imbibing they tend to remain at the same spot for several minutes.  Females are seen less often, but sometimes encountered along forest trails, or nectaring at flowers in forest gardens.  Both sexes habitually rest beneath leaves with their wings outspread.  Less commonly they will bask on the upper surface of large leaves, but tend to only do so in areas of dappled sunlight.”  This represents a new species for our site.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar eating water hyacinth
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake Hiawassee, Orlando, Florida
Date: 02/12/2019
Time: 02:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Closest I can find is Larva of the arctiid moth Paracles sp.
How you want your letter signed:  Phil

Tiger Moth Caterpillar on Water Hyacinth

Dear Phil,
We believe you might be correct.  We found an Invasive.org posting of
Paracles tenuis and the site states:  “Host:  common water hyacinth” and we are presuming the water hyacinth is the invasive species in question.  iNaturalist lists the genus Paracles in South America.  We don’t find the species listed on BugGuide, so this might be a new North American sighting.  Right now we are being thwarted in our research by a glacially slow internet.  We want to browse all Arctiinae caterpillars on BugGuide before we eliminate any native species.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Mbeya, Tanzania
Date: 02/07/2019
Time: 03:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugma:  We found this caterpillar in our yard today! We’re wondering what it will turn into? It sure is beautiful!
How you want your letter signed:  The Ornelas family

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Ornelas family,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar from the family Saturniidae.  This Caterpillar does not look well and we fear it will not survive to adulthood.  Perhaps it is the victim of internal parasites.  We will attempt to identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Horn worm
Geographic location of the bug:  Waiotahe Valley, Bay of Plenty
Date: 02/06/2019
Time: 05:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there.
What do they eat? Are they harmful? Found on ex forestry block!
How you want your letter signed:  Gertie

Hornworm of a Convolvulus Hawkmoth

Dear Gertie,
This is a Hornworm, the larva of a Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.   Its color, markings and the look of its horn lead us to believe this is the larva of a Convolvulus Hawkmoth,
Agrius convolvuli, which is pictured on New Zealand Invertebrates where it states:  “Favoured host plants in NZ are the bindweed and kumara.”  Butterfly House also provides a list of food plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Illinois at Wisconsin border
Date: 02/07/2019
Time: 11:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this caterpillar stuck to the ice on 2-6-19, in the middle of winter during a period of very wintery weather.  It was in the yard, no where near any trees or bushes.  The temps have been generally near freezing, but we did have a warming a few days ago (temps in the high 40s) which was just after a sever cold (-27 neg numbers 3 days in a row).  This caterpillar had its back feet frozen into the ice but its body was soft and it is still alive after being warmed in the house.
How you want your letter signed:  Steve

Winter Cutworm

Dear Steve,
This is a Cutworm in the family Noctuidae, and based on the time of year and the conditions under which it was found, we are confident it is a Winter Cutworm,
Noctua pronuba, the caterpillar of the invasive Large Yellow Underwing.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced from Europe to Nova Scotia in 1979, this species has since spread north to the Arctic Ocean, west to the Pacific, and south to the Gulf of Mexico.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillars, black with red spots and white spines
Geographic location of the bug:  Harare, Zimbabwe
Date: 01/31/2019
Time: 05:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hundreds of these caterpillars appear on only one tree in the garden, only in January. Sorry we don’t know the name of the tree either! We would love to know what butterfly or moth they turn into.
How you want your letter signed:  Julian

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Dear Julian,
We are very amused by your image of a bowl full of Cabbage Emperor Moth Caterpillars,
Bunaea alcinoe, because this species is eaten in some regions.  More information on the nutritional content can be found on this Eureka Mag article.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination