Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hornworm many spots
Geographic location of the bug:  North Dakota USA
Date: 08/17/2018
Time: 08:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman,
Found this little guy walking along a plaved pathway. Looked through submissions and couldn’t identify myself.
How you want your letter signed:  BiochemGuy

Leafy Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear BiochemGuy,
Your Hornworm is a Leafy Spurge Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles euphorbiae, which is pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  “The leafy spurge hawk moth,  Hyles euphorbiae (length: 2-3 cm, wingspan: 5-7 cm), was the first classical biological agent released against leafy spurge in the United States, with approval for introduction granted in 1965. Populations of this insect are present in several western states, including Montana, Idaho, North Dakota, Wyoming, Minnesota and Oregon, and now Washington (Spokane County; David Droppers; BAMONA). The moth was also introduced from Europe into Ontario, Canada, and then into Alberta where specimens are occasionally still taken.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What caterpillar is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tucson, AZ
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 12:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please tell me what kind of Caterpillar this is?  It is on top of my buckhorn cholla  plant.
How you want your letter signed:  Maureen C.

Staghorn Cholla Moth Caterpillar

Dear Maureen,
Thanks so much for letting us know you found this Caterpillar on a buckhorn cholla.  Often knowing the food plant upon which an insect is found is of tremendous help in making an identification, and it only took us about a minute to find this BugGuide image of a Staghorn Cholla Moth Caterpillar,
Euscirrhopterus cosyra.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed externally on cactus, rather than boring inside like many other cactus-feeders.”

Thank you Daniel! I would have never figured this out. I’m new to Arizona and have never seen anything like this.
It is a fascinating looking caterpillar! Thank you again for your help.
Maureen
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stickbug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Silver Spring, MD
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 12:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in the back yard.  Looks like there maybe eggs on its back.  Is it going to mess up my garden?
How you want your letter signed:  Gene

Parasitized Inchworm with Chalcid Pupae

Dear Gene,
Your “stickbug” is an Inchworm or Spanworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Geometridae, and they are excellent twig mimics.  What you have mistaken for eggs are actually the pupae of parasitoid Chalcid Wasps.  Here is a similarly parasitized Inchworm on BugGuide and here is an image of the Chalcid Wasp that emerged, also on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Milkweed
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 07:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thi dc is not a monarch caterpillar
How you want your letter signed:  Sue

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Sue,
Knowing the plant upon which an insect is found it is often extremely helpful for identification purposes, but not all insects are found on plants, so we don’t have a field for that purpose.  Milkweed is not a “Geographic location” and knowing if something was sighted in Pennsylvania or California or South Africa is also quite helpful, and every bug is found somewhere on the planet, which is why we have a Geographic location field on our submission form.  Having the Geographic location is also of assistance for persons scouring the internet for identification purposes, so we hope you will write back and provide an actual Geographic location so we don’t have to leave that field blank in our posting.  This is a Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar, one of the many species, like the Monarch caterpillar, that depends upon milkweed for survival.  We don’t understand what “Thi dc” means since we could not locate it in the dictionary.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stinbug sucking on a monarch caterpillar.
Geographic location of the bug:  Western New York State
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 09:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My wife was so excited to see a monarch caterpillar in our garden today (8/9/2018), only to discover that its “friend” was sucking its insides out.  I could tell the vampire was a true bug, but I had thought they mostly drank plant sap. How specific are they? Does it specialize in monarchs or does  feed  other larvae? Thanks! You guys are awesome!
How you want your letter signed:  Mark VanDerwater

Spined Soldier Bug preys on Monarch Caterpillar

Dear Mark,
While most Stink Bugs feed on fluids from plants, one subfamily, Asopinae, is predatory.  We believe we have correctly identified your Predatory Stink Bug as
Apoecilus cynicus thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “mostly feeds on caterpillars” but luckily they do not limit their diet to solely Monarch Caterpillars so relocating the Predatory Stink Bug far from the milkweed, perhaps in the vegetable patch, would be our solution to repeating this scenario in the future. 

Thank you Daniel! I was poking around insect sights too and came up with the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris. Known to prefer lepidoptera larvae. Also has the dark abdominal tip.

Hi Mark,
We agree that you have provided us with a correction.  The Spined Soldier Bug is another member of the Predatory Stink Bug subfamily, and this BugGuide image is a good match, and the BugGuide description “Black streak on wing membrane + spined humeri are diagnostic” matches your image.  Thanks for bringing this misidentification to our attention. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Ontario
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 08:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Have searched a bit but not confident about what type this is.
Possibly an imperial?
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Cindy,
This is indeed an Imperial Moth Caterpillar, and its darker coloration indicates it is getting ready to pupate.  Caterpillars will frequently change color and leave the host plant when it is time to pupate, so we are guessing it was found on the ground as Imperial Moth Caterpillars pupate underground.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination