Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pupa identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Canberra Australia
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 05:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Been trying to identify this but coming up with no idea. It looks like a tent caterpillar web but not their pupae…
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

Possibly Pupae of Imperial Jezebel

We wish your image had more critical detail, especially of the individual pupae.  We do not believe these pupae belong to a caterpillar.  We will continue to research this matter, but in the meanwhile, we are posting your request as Unidentified.

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Richard Stickney, we believe these might be the pupae of the Imperial Jezebel or Imperial White, Delias harpalyce, which is pictured on The Victoria Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Oklahoma
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 02:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
My friend and I were walking yesterday and came across this beauty.  Could you please tell us what it is?  Thanks for the help!
How you want your letter signed:  Dana and Laurie

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Dana and Laurie,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the family Saturniidae, and based on this BugGuide image, we are nearly certain it is a pre-pupal Luna Moth Caterpillar.  This species often turns from green to orange as its time for pupation approaches.

Thank you so much for the information!  My 2nd graders just submitted an entry to the Ugly Bug Contest so I’m really paying attention to bugs right now.  I’ll share this experience with them so that they know that this is available to them.  Really appreciate your time!
Dana Stair
Gifted Resources Coordinator
Jefferson Elementary
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found on Arizona Cypress
Geographic location of the bug:  Boca Raton, FL
Date: 10/06/2018
Time: 05:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  After seeing my Cypress being infected by something – it seemed like it occurred overnight – I checked it carefully and found this pine cone looking creature on my cypress, pulled it off and it MOVED in my hand! When I put it on the ground, a caterpillar-looking creature stuck it’s head out. I actually removed thousands which I think can be called a severe infestation.  (Is it a saw fly larvae.)
How can I stop further destruction to my tree? And avoid cross contamination to another cypress nearby.
How you want your letter signed:  Carol in Boca

Bagworms

Dear Carol in Boca,
You have Bagworms, the larvae of a moth in the family Psychidae.  According to BugGuide:  “
Larvae (bagworms) construct spindle-shaped bags covered with pieces of twigs, leaves, etc., and remain in them — enlarging the bags as they grow — until they pupate (also in the bag). Adult females remain in the bag, emitting pheromones which attract adult males to mate with them.  Eggs are laid inside the bag, and when they hatch the larvae crawl away to begin construction of their own individual cases.”  We do not provide extermination advice.

Thank you Daniel for the weekend answer.  They are marvelous creatures that disguise themselves EXTREMELY well. For my next mission: to make sure I see them and get rid of them well before they multiply.
Carol
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of butterfly is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Taylors SC (Upstate SC)
Date: 10/02/2018
Time: 01:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a type of Gulf Fritillary butterfly? We have about 25 chrysalis hanging on the back of our house. This one (2nd pic) hasn’t opened it’s wings yet, but I didn’t see any orange underneath, like the pictures I found online.
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Tina C

Newly Emerged Gulf Fritillary

Dear Tina,
We love your image of the wall with various stages of development of Gulf Fritillaries.  Your close-ups are of a pre-pupal Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar and a newly eclosed adult Gulf Fritillary.  The dorsal surface of its wings are orange.  You must have a passion flower vine nearby.

Gulf Fritillaries: Stages of Metamorphosis

Pre-Pupal Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Polyphemus moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Seattle
Date: 09/24/2018
Time: 11:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugma:  Hi – I Found a polyphemus caterpillar in the mail box(!?) and transferred it to an observation tank placed in a classroom.  I provided pin oak leaves and the caterpillar has spun a cocoon.  One website said the cocoon needs to over-winter in a cool place and will emerge in June.  Another website said it will emerge in a couple of weeks.  I would love for this marvelous creature to be able to survive and emerge  – any suggestions?
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Candace Robbins

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Dear Candace,
This is indeed a Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar.  Overwintering in a cool place is excellent advice, but the June emergence is probably information for a location with a cold winter.  According to BugGuide:  “In southern United States, adults fly April–May and July–August (2 broods); in northern part of range, adults fly from May to July (1 brood).”  BugGuide lists Washington sightings from April to October, which leads us to believe you may have two generations, so emergence might happen well before June, possibly even in several weeks.  We just located information that disputes that supposition, because according to Pacific Northwest Moths:  “Our populations are most likely single-brooded with capture dates from mid-April until August.  Second-brooded populations exist in areas with warmer climates.”  You might be able to witness eclosion in April.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what in the world?
Geographic location of the bug:  Blue Ridge Mtns, NC
Date: 09/23/2018
Time: 08:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  found hanging in a tree.  stung head when walked under it.  felt like bee sting.
dont know if its a bug or a flower.
How you want your letter signed:  Bug or Flower?

Saddleback Caterpillar

You were stung by a Saddleback Caterpillar, Acharia stimulea.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillars are capable of inflicting lasting and painful stings with their spines.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination