Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern California
Date: 11/08/2018
Time: 04:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, my family found a blue and white striped caterpillar and this website is the only place that jas a picture of it we would love your help.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you for your time and consideration, Emily Quick

Prickly Pear Borer

Dear Emily,
This Caterpillar looks familiar to us, and we suspect we have previously identified it somewhere in our archives.  It reminds us of a Carpenter Moth Caterpillar in the family Cossidae, but we cannot substantiate that suspicion at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.

Prickly Pear Borer

Update:  November 21, 2018
Thanks to a comment from Karl, we have identified this Prickly Pear Borer.  According to BugGuide other common names include:  “banded cactus borers (larvae of junctolineella and subumbrella) and blue cactus borers (larvae of dentata and prodenialis).”

Prickly Pear Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown chrysalis
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, Ohio
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 04:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So, saw this chrysalis on the outside of a building.  No clue who made it.
How you want your letter signed:  Amber

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Amber,
Most butterflies have a chrysalis that hangs downward from the tip of the abdomen from a silken button spun by the caterpillar, but most Swallowtail caterpillars have an upright chrysalis that is also supported by a silken girdle.  Your chrysalis looks like a Swallowtail Butterfly chrysalis, but we are not certain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What are these caterpillars
Geographic location of the bug:  Selma, texas
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 05:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these caterpillars on a potted plant I had.  They have eaten almost all the leaves that I can’t remember what kind of plant it was.  I’m almost sure it was an Impatien.   I think they’re the same caterpillar but not sure.  What are they?
How you want your letter signed:  Delia

Tersa Sphinx Caterpillars

Dear Delia,
These appear to be the caterpillars of the Tersa Sphinx, which occurs in both green and brown forms.  Are you sure the plant was
Impatiens?  A preferred food plant for the Tersa Sphinx is Pentas, according to Sphingidae of the Americas.

Tersa Sphinx Caterpillar

Daniel,  thank you for your quick response.  You’re correct,  these were Pentas.  I just couldn’t remember what kind of plant it was
Delia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  caterpillar ID
Geographic location of the bug:  St Petersburg FL
Date: 10/27/2018
Time: 02:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I was just hoping you might be able to help me identify this large caterpillar found on my fence this morning
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, NAS

Unknown Hornworm

Dear NAS,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  Though your individual reminds us of the Hornworm of a Ficus Sphinx, it is not one of the typical color variations we see in that species.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a species identification

Unknown Hornworm

Update:  November 1, 2018
We received several comments indicating this is a member of the genus Erinnyis, and Cesar Crash provided this BugGuide link to the Alope Sphinx larva.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange furry purple caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida panhandle
Date: 10/23/2018
Time: 05:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey bug man this little guy fell out of a tree in my windshield on my way home today  I’m semi new to Florida and know there are lots of crazy bugs here. Never seen one of these tho. It is about an inch long dark purple with some reddish orange on the underbelly. Did a reverse image search to try to find the species. No luck. Made it all the way home and took him off the car and realeased him in the grass. Thanks for any help!
How you want your letter signed:  Jordon

Monkey Slug

Dear Jordon,
You should be commended on even recognizing that the Monkey Slug is a caterpillar.  Handle with caution.  Monkey Slugs can sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Antigua Guatemala
Date: 10/21/2018
Time: 03:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I found these caterpillars in my garden in Antigua Guatemala in July.
I made some research and it could be a Costa Rican hairy caterpillar (Automeris metzli ?) but I am not sure as Antigua is located at 1600 m in the mountains…
What do you think ?
Thank you !
How you want your letter signed:  Voiz

Automeris Caterpillar

Dear Voiz,
We believe you have the genus
Automeris correct, but we are not certain of the species.  It looks to us like it might be Automeris boucardi, but we will check with Bill Oehlke to see if he can verify the species identity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination