Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Richmond Va
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 10:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this thing that was crawling on the sidewalk of my kids’ school today?
How you want your letter signed:  Crystal

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Crystal,
This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Swallowtail butterfly.  There are several species in your area, and our best guess is that this is the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail,
Papilio glaucus.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  The adult Eastern Tiger Swallowtail is a gorgeous butterfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Mobile, AL
Date: 06/13/2019
Time: 07:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any idea what this is?   Found on a lemon tree
How you want your letter signed:  Laura

Orange Dog

Dear Laura,
This is the Caterpillar of a Giant Swallowtail, commonly called an Orange Dog.  It will eat some leaves, but it will not negatively affect the health of your tree.  Unless there are hundreds of them or the tree is very very small, the tree can stand to lose a few leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Roaring springs, TX
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 02:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this Caterpillar on a herping trip and have been having trouble identifying it. It was found in early morning around 8:45am on the 1st of June. Not sure what plant it was on though. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Lisa

Hooded Owlet Caterpillar

Dear Lisa,
This is one of the Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars in the genus
Cucullia.  We believe we have correctly identified it as Cucullia laetifica, thanks to BugGuide images and data on the range which includes Texas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  pink dotted caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  goa india
Date: 06/10/2019
Time: 10:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  HI
my friend noticed this caterpillar.
here’s the photo i took . quite attractive colours.
I suppose it is a stage of a moth or butterfly
can you know what type moth or butterfly it turns into?
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Carlos

Common Mime Caterpillar

Dear Carlos,
This caterpillar is quite colorful, but alas, we have not had any luck with an identification.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Update:  June 11, 2019
Thanks to a comment from Karl, we now know that this is a Common Mime Caterpillar, Chilasa [Papilio] clytia.  According to Butterflies of Singapore:  “Across the range where this species occurs, the early stages feed on leaves of serveral plants in the Lauraceae family. The sole recorded local host plant, Cinnamomum iners (Common name: Clover Cinnamon, Wild Cinnamon), is a very common plant all over Singapore, readily found in nature reserves, gardens, parks and wastelands etc. It is a small to medium-sized tree with 3-nerved leaves. Eggs and early stages of the Common Mime are typically found on saplings at heights from knee to waist level.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Fieldale, VA
Date: 06/08/2019
Time: 08:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please help me identify this caterpillar I pulled off my hops plant in late May/early June?
How you want your letter signed:  Sandra Nester in VA

Questionmark Caterpillar

Dear Sandra,
When attempting to identify plant feeding insects, it is tremendously helpful to know the food plant.  Thanks for informing us this Caterpillar was feeding on hops.  We quickly identified it as the caterpillar of a Questionmark butterfly thanks to BugGuide.  Here is a BugGuide image that looks even more like your individual.  The adult Questionmark is a beautiful butterfly.

Questionmark Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  unknown “caterpillar”
Geographic location of the bug:  Buda, Tx (between Austin & San Marcos)
Date: 06/06/2019
Time: 06:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It was walking across sidewalk underneath Elm trees.  White stripes were new to me.  Prob going to find its common!
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Cato

Hornless Hornworm: Eumorpha species

Dear Mike,
This is the caterpillar of a moth in the family Sphingidae, and most caterpillars in the family have caudal horns, and they are known as Hornworms.  There are several genera that have most if not all species shedding the horn as the caterpillar grows.  Your hornless Hornworm is in the genus
Eumorpha, but we are not certain of the species.  It might be the Satellite Sphinx, pictured on BugGuide, or it might be the Vine Sphinx, also pictured on BugGuide.  We will attempt to contact Bill Oehlke to get his opinion, and it is possible that frequent contributor to our site, Bostjan Dvorak, will recognize it and provide a comment.

Facebook Posting from James Lee Phillips:  “I’m really sad for the hornless hornworms. They deserve a less existentialist taxonomy.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination