Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Are these venomous?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sao Paulo, Brazil
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 10:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Are these stinging caterpillars or slugs?
How you want your letter signed:  Danirl

Owl Butterfly Caterpillars

Dear Danirl,
These caterpillars are not venomous and they do not sting.  They are some species of Owl Butterfly Caterpillars from the genus
Caligo based on this CanStock Photo image and this Alamy image.  You can find some good information on Insetologia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Atop Casper Mtn,. Wyoming
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 02:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would love to know the identity of this cat.  Photo taken 8/13/19.
How you want your letter signed:  Dwaine

Unidentified Moth Caterpillar

Dear Dwaine,
Despite the excellent detail in your images and the distinctive characteristics of this Moth Caterpillar, we are unable to provide you with an identification at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.

Unidentified Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  big silkmoth caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Bangor, Maine
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 03:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We rescued this caterpillar who was crossing the highway.  I’ve seen photos of it online with people saying it’s a Luna, but I’m thinking maybe Polyphemus?
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan and Emily

Pre-Pupal Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ryan and Emily,
Distinguishing a Luna Caterpillar from a Polyphemus Caterpillar can be challenging, but we believe your caterpillar is a Luna Caterpillar.  The pink coloration is due to it being pre-pupal, and we have seen numerous images of pink pre-pupal Luna Caterpillars.  Luna Moth caterpillars, according to BugGuide, are:  “Larva lime-green with pink spots and weak subspiracular stripe on abdomen. Yellow lines cross the larva’s back near the back end of each segment (compare Polyphemus moth caterpillars, which have yellow lines crossing at spiracles). Anal proleg edged in yellow. Sparse hairs.”  Your individual is lacking the “yellow lines crossing at spiracles” that are present in Polyphemus Caterpillars.

Thank you so much Daniel.  What a tricky ID!  Much appreciated.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Marin County, Ca
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 09:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, Woman or Bugster,  Can you tell me what these gorgeous creatures emerging are?  They’re on my redwood siding, and there’s a second wee house not yet ready to disgorge its person/s.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you so much!

Mating Lappet Moths

These appear to be mating Lappet Moths in the genus Tolype, with the remains of a cocoon.  We suspect the cocoon originally housed the female in the pair, and the male sensed her pheromones once she emerged.  Based on images posted to the Natural History of Orange County, we suspect the species is Tolype distincta.  Thanks for also including a good image of the cocoon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Gloucester pool on the Trent Severn waterway
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 01:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A caterpillar like this stung my son last weekend. After it crawled across his hand he had a double track of very itchy sore spots
How you want your letter signed:  Pam

Io Moth Caterpillar

Dear Pam,
We needed to research your location which we mistakenly thought was in the UK.  Now that we know you are in Ontario, Canada, your son being stung by an Io Moth Caterpillar makes sense.  This is a North American species with a well documented history of stinging.  According to Poison Help:  “The nettling organs are borne on fleshy tubercles, and the spines are usually yellow with black tips. The spines are connected to poison glands.”  You may also read about them on Entomology University of Kentucky.  To the best of our knowledge, the reaction is localized and though painful, the sting is not a cause of concern, though we would always recommend seeking medical advice if there are any concerns.

Thank you very much!  Will pass on the info to my son.
Pam
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar we’ve never seen
Geographic location of the bug:  Belfast, Maine
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 12:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this caterpillar this morning in our yard.  We simply can’t find any one similar in trying to identify what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Katie

Paddle Caterpillar

Dear Katie,
The Paddle Caterpillar,
Acronicta funeralis, is surely a distinctive species.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of alder, apple, birch, blueberry/huckleberry (Vaccinium spp.), cottonwood, dogwood, elm, hazel, hickory, maple, oak, willow.”

Thank you so much!!  My daughter will be ecstatic to know we got a reply.  We truly appreciate it!
Katie
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination