Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A Different Kind of Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Lexington, Massachusetts USA
Date: 10/14/2019
Time: 03:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I spotted this unique guy while walking my dog this morning.  Could you please identify him for us?
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Tracey Hynes

Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Tracey,
We identified this Hornworm from the family Sphingidae as the Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles gallii, thanks to images on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and White hairy caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Guatemala
Date: 10/11/2019
Time: 09:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found two of these large caterpillars on different avocado trees in a wet mountain area near San Pedro, Guatemala, do you know what they are called? 3″ soft hairy, don’t bit or sting.
How you want your letter signed:  Caroline

Unidentified Caterpillar

Dear Caroline,
We tried unsuccessfully to identify this distinctive Moth Caterpillar.  Some families we explored were Erebidae, Lasiocampidae and Apatelodidae.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more success with this identification.

Unidentified Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Varition of Morocco horned caterpillar color
Geographic location of the bug:  Closest to Erfoud, Morocco
Date: 10/08/2019
Time: 10:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello BugMan! I wanted to show you this variation in color of the (perhaps) Barbary Spurge? Hornworm.(OR tell me the exact ID; I see some with two dots!) We found these while riding camels in Erg Chebbi sand dunes on the vegetation shown. We gently tickled one and put him on a leaf to better photograph. Then we put him back on leaves. There were LOTS of them! They can make their way quite fast over the sand when looking for another bush! I took the photos on September 26, 2019. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Cynthia S.

Hornworm from genus Hyles.

Dear Cynthia,
This hornworm is definitely from the genus Hyles, but we cannot be certain of the species.  It does look most to us like the Barberry Spurge Hawkmoth caterpillar pictured on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orange Dog
Geographic location of the bug:  Francestown, NH
Date: 10/04/2019
Time: 02:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is in reference to my 2012 post of a Giant Swallowtail Butterfly here: https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2012/08/07/giant-swallowtail-in-new-hampshire
After 7 years finally noticed half a dozen or so on a Gas plant(Dictamnus albus).
How you want your letter signed:  alf

Orange Dog

Dear alf,
Thanks so much for providing documentation of Orange Dogs in your New Hampshire garden seven years after first seeing an adult Giant Swallowtail, a species reported in Vermont on BugGuide, but not in New Hampshire.  According to the Missouri Botanical Garden site, Gas Plant is in the citrus family Rutacea, which is consistent with BugGuide information on larval food plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  WTF? Crazy sea urchin looking bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Middle Tennessee
Date: 10/03/2019
Time: 05:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So found this bug around 4 o’clock In the morning while taking the dog to the bathroom. Actually my dog found it. Idk if it was curled into a ball as a defense mechanism or if this is just what it looks like. I grew up here and have never seen anything remotely close to this. Other than those hairy black and red caterpillar ant things that bite the crap out you and hurt like well you know. Anyway I don’t think that is what this is cause I’ve never seen one of those this big before. As a matter of perspective it’s in a normal size pickle jar so you can see it’s roughly the size of a ping pong ball or so. Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  SimplySimon

Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar

Dear SimplySimon,
This is a Woolly Bear, the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We are relatively confident it is a Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar,
Hypercompe scribonia, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Late instar caterpillar mostly black with tufts of stiff black hairs of equal length radiating around body. Rolls up head to tail when disturbed. When curled, red intersegmental rings visible between the hairs.”  We have numerous images on our site of the adult Giant Leopard Moth, but not many of the caterpillars so your submission is a welcome addition to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Eagle River, Wisconsin
Date: 10/01/2019
Time: 10:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this caterpillar on a nearby wooded pathway yesterday, and didn’t know what it was or where it was going–end of September can usher in very cold temperatures here.  So, at home we identified it as a Luna Moth Caterpillar.  We want to properly release it back into the wild.  It would be lovely to have seen it develop into the moth, but we don’t feel confident that we can keep it healthy.  Will it over-winter here in the North?  or Will it still be able to mate yet this autumn?  It was found under a soft Maple tree quite close to a lake and alder bushes near the lake and surrounding wetland.  I was even wondering if it could drown?  Thank you for information so that we can release it soon and get it on its way to the right environment.
How you want your letter signed:  The Rasmussens

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Dear Rasmussens,
Luna Moth Caterpillars and Polyphemus Moth Caterpillars can be difficult to distinguish from one another.  We believe your caterpillar is a Polyphemus Caterpillar.  The identifying feature is a pale yellow band that runs through the spiracles or breathing holes on the Polyphemus Caterpillar.  It is described on BugGuide as:  “Larva: body large, bright green, with red and silvery spots below setae, and oblique yellow lines running through spiracles on abdomen; diagonal streak of black and silver on ninth abdominal segment; head and true legs brown; base of primary setae red, subdorsal and lateral setae have silver shading below; end of prolegs with yellow ring, and tipped in black.”  At this time of year in your location, we speculate this individual is preparing to pupate and it will overwinter in the cocoon.  Caterpillars are not aquatic.  They can drown.

Dear Daniel:?? Thank you for the information.?? It is nice to know what it is– Polyphemus, not Luna, and that it will overwinter.?? It started spinning yesterday between two leaves in the leaf litter at the bottom of the container, currently in our garage.?? So now, we will have to decide the next step:?? possibly to get info on overwintering it in our refrigerator with a constant temperature or it will be subjected to?? subzero temperatures for much of our Northern Wisconsin winter.?? If you had thoughts and time on this, don’t hesitate to drop a line.?? We appreciate and feel fortunate to have had your communication.?? Much of the information we were finding is not specific in details or confusing.???? –Patty & Eric Rasmussen

Dear Patty and Eric,
We do not raise caterpillars, but in captivity, one needs to be cognizant of temperature and humidity.  Too warm and the moth will emerge prematurely.  Too damp or too dry it might not survive.  We would recommend keeping it outdoors in a protected location where it will benefit from precipitation, but not get too wet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination