Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spiny caterpillar for ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Virginia, USA
Date: 09/18/2017
Time: 12:59 PM EDT
Early autumn in Virginia — mid-September
Found this caterpillar on an Eastern Bluestar (Amsonia) plant in my garden
About 1.5 inches long
How you want your letter signed: VirginiaGardenGal

Long Winged Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Virginia Garden Gal,
We suspected this to be a Dagger Moth Caterpillar from the genus
Acronicta, a large and diverse genus with several spiny caterpillars.  We eventually identified your caterpillar as that of a Long Winged Dagger Moth, Acronicta illustris, thanks to this and other BugGuide images.  It appears as though this caterpillar might be capable of stinging.

Long Winged Dagger Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Cyprus
Date: 09/14/2017
Time: 09:32 AM EDT
I noticed this rather large caterpillar in southern Cyprus and just wanted to know what type it is and wether it will become a butterfly or a moth. It had yellow circles going down the sides of its body and was smooth with no hairs. It also had a little spike at the rear end.
How you want your letter signed:  Jo-Ann

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Jo-Ann,
Though your camera angle is not ideal for identification purposes, we are able to barely view the caudal horn indicating this is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  Based on your description and location, and that the plant it is feeding upon appears to be a grape vine, we believe this is a Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar, and Project Noah includes an individual sighted on Cyprus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  nest
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 09/13/2017
Time: 02:17 PM EDT
Please help me identify this “nest” that we found on a Philodendron leaf. We are guessing some kind of parasitic wasp.
How you want your letter signed:  Florida

Parasitized Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Florida,
We found a similar looking image on BugGuide identified as a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Dasychira that has been parasitized, but the Parasitoid was not identified.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna moth and sphinx catepillar
Geographic location of the bug:  North texas
Date: 09/12/2017
Time: 04:46 PM EDT
My son and I just found these two less than a foot away from each other. I think we have the names right but I’m not sure.
How you want your letter signed:  Breanna Fouse

Four Horned Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Breanna,
Both of your identifications are correct, and we can even provide you with a species for the Sphinx Caterpillar.  Though the common name ignores the caudal horn present in so many Sphinx Caterpillars, the Four Horned Sphinx is also called the Elm Sphinx.  The leaves in your image appear to be elm leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug wearing green vest
Geographic location of the bug:  Westchester County, NY
Date: 09/12/2017
Time: 02:08 PM EDT
Found this strange bug outside our home and have never seen anything like this
How you want your letter signed:  Bug Patrol

Saddleback Caterpillar

Dear Bug Patrol,
Handle with caution.  This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar known as a Saddleback Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar ID ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Western NC
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 01:39 PM EDT
I discovered the caterpillar in the attached photo over the weekend at my home in Western NC – and was wondering what it is ?
any information you could provide would be greatly appreciated
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Don Underwood

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Don,
This impressive caterpillar is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar and its orange color indicates it is pre-pupal.  It has recently come down from the deciduous or coniferous tree upon which it was feeding.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of Bald Cypress, basswood, birch, cedar, elm, hickory, Honeylocust, maple, oak, pine, Sassafras (
Sassafras albidum), Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), sycamore, walnut.  Adults do not feed.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination