Currently viewing the category: "Caterpillars and Pupa"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s inside this chrysalis?
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix, AZ, Geranium Plant
Date: 02/06/2018
Time: 01:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just curious what is inside this little guy.. moves when it’s touched. Maybe a butterfly or moth? About an inch and a half long. If it is harmless, how can I protect it?
How you want your letter signed:  Keri

Moth Pupa

Dear Keri,
We are confident that this is a Moth Pupa, but beyond that, we doubt that we can provide a more specific identification.  It might be a member of the superfamily Noctuoidea, a group with many members that pupate underground without spinning a cocoon.  We did locate this image of a caterpillar from the Owlet moth family eating the leaf of a geranium in nearby California on BugGuide, and it is possibly your individual is closely related.  Knowing the food plant is often a tremendous assistance when identifying insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  #dargle, kzn
Date: 01/30/2018
Time: 05:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This caterpillar is in my garden. Can you tell me what caterpillar it is please?
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks Tania

Thank you but I managed to find it eventually on the net.  It’s an oleander hawk moth.

Pre-Pupal Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Tania,
Thanks for informing us that you identified your Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar.  The yellow coloration and its location on the ground indicate it is pre-pupal, and about to undergo metamorphosis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth larvae
Geographic location of the bug:  Morayfield, Queensland
Date: 01/23/2018
Time: 09:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help! These little critters are being laid by moths I believe. I find them mostly outside my house for example under the eaves but most annoyingly under my pergola or even inside if I leave the door open. They eventually get free from there ‘nest’ and dangle down in a long silk like train, falling onto me and I find them all over me! I imagine they would also be getting into my hair and they are giving me the eeby jeebies! This photo was taken looking down when I found a ‘nest’ under my outdoor glass table. Do you know what type of moth lays these little buggers and how do I deter them? (The moths)
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Kind Regards, Raelene

Possibly Tussock Moth Hatchlings

Dear Raelene,
Immature Caterpillars can be difficult to identify with certainty.  Is there a pine tree nearby?  These look like they might be hatchlings of the Painted Pine Moth or White Spotted Tussock Moth,
Orgyia australia, a species pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.  You need to scroll down to see the egg mass.  If our identification is correct, the female that laid these eggs is flightless, and the eggs are laid in the remnants of the cocoon from which she emerged.  Winged males will fly to the female to mate.  We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of caterpillar is it
Geographic location of the bug:  Ballito south Africa
Date: 01/04/2018
Time: 01:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please could you let me know what type of caterpillar it is and are they poisonous it is about 10 cm long and as thick as a pork sausage
How you want your letter signed:  Very interested

Spiny Hornworm: Lophostethus dumolinii

Dear Very Interested,
When we first posted images of this Spiny Hornworm Caterpillar,
Lophostethus dumolinii, back in 2011, it proved quite the challenge to identify.  We sought the assistance of Bill Oehlke with the identification.  At that time, we couldn’t locate any matching images online. We now found a matching image on Aylestone 8:  Biodiversity on my Farm and there is also an image on African Moths.  Hornworms, the caterpillars of Hawkmoths in the family Sphingidae, are not poisonous or venomous, and despite a sometimes fierce appearance, they are harmless to humans.

Spiny Hornworm: Lophostethus dumolinii

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wierd cocoon thing?
Geographic location of the bug:  Broulee NSW Australia
Date: 01/24/2018
Time: 11:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in a pile of raked up leaves in the middle of summer. The top part that seems to be segments was twitching back and forth when disturbed.
How you want your letter signed:  Kell

Probably Hawk Moth Pupa

Dear Kell,
This pupa will eventually become a very large moth.  We do not believe it is in the family Saturniidae.  We suspect it is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  Moths in this family do not spin cocoons.  They produce a naked pupa like the one you found, and it is generally underground or among leaf litter.  Many Sphingidae pupae are pictured on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar/grub id
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Panhadle WV
Date: 01/22/2018
Time: 09:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this little guy/gal outside today I think it may be confused due to warm weather we have been having
How you want your letter signed:  Catherine Hubbard

Skipper Caterpillar

Dear Catherine,
Our initial impression was that this might be the larva of an Elm Sawfly, but then we saw then large head, which leads us to believe this is a Skipper Caterpillar similar to this image posted to BugGuide.  Skippers are classified as butterflies, but they share many of the characteristics of moths.

Skipper Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination