Currently viewing the category: "Caddisflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need Help to Identify this Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Date: 01/13/2019
Time: 01:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have been unable to find any insect anywhere on the internet that looks like the one that I photographed in Lanark County, Ontario, Canada, in June of 2018. It is on the leaf of a Sumac tree, if that helps to determine approximate size.
Appreciate any assistance you can provide in identifying this insect.
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Stu

Zebra Caddisfly

Dear Stu,
This is a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera, a group of mostly drab, mothlike insects with aquatic larvae, meaning they are generally found near a source of water where the nymphs are able to develop.  Your individual is very brightly colored, and we quickly identified it on BugGuide as a Zebra Caddisfly,
Macrostemum zebratum.  According to BugGuide:  “adults Jun-Jul”, so your sighting was right on schedule.

Zebra Caddisfly

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for the quick identification. It is amazing that, once you have the identity, how many images you can now find on the internet, but beforehand, I couldn’t find any!
Your note that they are generally found close to a source of water was spot on… the Sumac trees were within twenty-five yards of the Mississippi River.
Thanks again,
Stu

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Evening Visitor
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Austria
Date: 10/08/2018
Time: 02:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Daniel, it’s a cool fall evening here in Austria and I opened my windows just to get a little fresh air. Suddenly, this little fella started circling the overheard lamp. I thought it was a moth based on its behavior, but it landed and it’s clearly not a moth. It’s about 2 inches  long with the antennae. Any idea what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  N. Fritz

Caddisfly

Dear N. Fritz,
This is a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera, and they really do resemble moths.   Caddisflies have aquatic larvae known as Caseworms that build shelters for themselves from twigs, pebbles or shells with each species making a very specific type of case.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  found in water
Geographic location of the bug:  Minnesota
Date: 02/11/2018
Time: 01:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug came up my ice fishing hole looks like it is connected to a stick
How you want your letter signed:  any

Caseworm

Dear Any,
This is the aquatic larva of a Caddisfly, commonly called a Caseworm because the larva constructs a shelter from twigs, pebbles, shells or other materials as a means of protection.  Each species of Caddisfly constructs a different looking shelter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this creature?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hartford County, Connecticut
Date: 09/24/2017
Time: 08:55 PM EDT
Hellooooo Bugman. It’s great to see your site as active as ever. I sent you an inquiry years ago and you were able to help. Thank you! Could you please help again? We have been seeing several of these guys and I thought they were roaches at first! The body looks more like a moth to me, but the antennae look more like a beetle. The wings stand up at an interesting angle.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks again! Annie

Caddisfly

Dear Annie,
This is a Caddisfly, and your observation that it resembles a moth is understandable.  Entomologists tend to agree that the Caddisfly order Trichoptera does share many similar traits with the Moth order Lepidoptera.  Do you live near a body of water?  The nymphs of Caddisflies are aquatic and they are commonly called Caseworms.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Autumn Brown Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  New Brunswick, Canada
Date: 09/16/2017
Time: 08:34 AM EDT
These bugs just started coming around recently as the weather starts to change these bugs started to come around everywhere!! What are they?!
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Danielle

Caddisfly

Dear Danielle,
This is a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera.  Caddisfly nymphs are aquatic and they are frequently called Caseworms as they construct often elaborate protective cases from twigs, sand and shells.  Since the nymphs are aquatic, we suspect you live near a body of fresh water.  Your submission is the second we are posting this morning from New Brunswick, Canada

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Aquatic bug?!
Location: Glacial river, base of mt Rainier
July 31, 2017 8:24 pm
Hello! We were out playing in a very cold glacial river at the base of Mt Rainier in Washington state and came across these guys today. There were hundreds of them on rocks in the water, but only a few this sprawled out and large outside the water.
Signature: Alexa

Stonefly Exuvia

Dear Alexa,
Your images document two different, unrelated aquatic insects.  The image of the one “sprawled out and large outside the water” is actually the exuvia or cast-off exoskeleton of a Stonefly, and the “hundreds of them on rocks in the water” are Caseworms, the larvae or naiads of Caddisflies.  Larval Caddisflies are known as Caseworms and according to BugGuide:  “Most species live in a mobile case constructed from plant material, algae, grains of sand, pieces of snail shells, or entirely of silk. The case is held together with strands of silk secreted by the larva. In some species the case is attached to a rock, log, or other underwater surface; a few species have no case and are free-living.”  The cases on your individuals appear to be constructed using grains of sand or small pebbles.

Caseworms: Caddisfly Naiads

Caseworms: Caddisfly Naiads

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination