Currently viewing the category: "Whites and Sulfurs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s Buzzing on the Baccharis?  Dainty Sulphur among others
Location:  Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
September 30, 2012 at 11:03AM
Yesterday Daniel and Clare went to Elyria Canyon Park to water the butterfly garden and take inventory of tasks that need to be completed.  The Baccharis is in full bloom around the Red Barn and countless Honey Bees were buzzing about.  There were also other insects interested in the nectar, including a Painted Lady, Skippers, Marine Blues and Gray Hairstreaks.  Daniel noticed a small creamy yellow butterfly about the size of a Marine Blue, but it did not alight and he could not get a good view.  Today Daniel made a trip back to the Red Barn to photograph What’s Buzzing Around the Baccharis? and he was lucky enough to get two images of the butterfly in question, a Dainty Sulphur,
Nathalis iole, that was nectaring a few feet from the ready camera.  Julian Donahue sent an email to local fold on August 23, 2012 with this information:  “Hi all,  Thought you might be interested in a sighting this afternoon: a Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole) nectaring on a variety of flowers in my front yard.  First time I’ve seen this southern migrant here in several years. Too windy and warm to get a picture before it departed, but keep an eye out for a small yellow butterfly with lots of black on the upperside of the forewing that shows through the wing when the butterfly is at rest.  Julian.”  This photo substantiates Julian’s August sighting.

Dainty Sulphur

Here is the second photo.

Dainty Sulphur

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dainty Sulphur Photos
Location:  St. Augusta MN
September 20, 2012 5:57 AM
Hi Daniel,
Here are a couple more shots for your archive.  I’ve seen Dainty Sulphurs here in Cantral Minnesota for a few summers now.
I’m kind of surprised to read they don’t overwinter this far north.  They certainly must try.  The female in the first photo was laying eggs on weeds in our vegetable garden; on chickweed, I think.
Sorry the second one is blurry.  But I thought if you’re short on photos, I’d include it since it does show the upperside.
Are you still looking for western tiger swallowtail shots?  I may have a few.
Cheers.  And thanks again for this fantastic service!
Don J. Dinndorf
St. Augusta (central), MN

Dainty Sulphur laying Eggs

Hi Don,
You are so thoughtful to supply our archive with images that we are lacking.  These are marvelous images of a Dainty Sulphur or Dwarf Yellow Sulphur.  After a bit of post production sharpening, the movement in the second Dainty Sulphur photo is a bit less blurry.  If your photos are from Minnesota, your Tiger Swallowtails are most likely either Eastern Tiger Swallowtails or Canadian Tiger Swallowtails.  If you have nice images, send them our way and we will post them if we have time.

Dainty Sulphur

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dwarf Yellow Sulphur Butterfly
Location: 36 degrees 24’ 57.11”N; 88 degrees 12’ 21.94” W [Tennessee]
September 19, 2012 8:23 pm
I think my previous attempt to send to you did not work. If it did, guess you can delete one of the messages. I believe that the two pictures here are Dwarf Yellow Sulphur Butterflies. They are really small – probably less than an inch from body to wingtip. There were at least a dozen or more in our field late this afternoon (Sept. 19, 2012). We are in Buchanan, TN which is in the northeastern corner of west TN (Kentucky Lake is our county’s eastern border and Kentucky is our northern border). The butterflies did not seem to be looking for flowers – the two here were on blades of grass and some even lit on piles of dead grass left from haying last month. I did not see this butterfly on your site nor on Bug Guide, but based my ID on National Audubon Society Field Guide to Butterflies.
Signature: Mary Ann

Dainty Sulphur

Hi Mary Ann,
We could not find any evidence that you sent this submission twice.  We are thrilled to get your lovely photos of a Dwarf Yellow Sulphur,
Nathalis iole, which BugGuide calls the Dainty Yellow and elaborates:  “Resident in Guatemala north to peninsular Florida and the Southwest. Cannot survive cold winters, therefore every summer re-colonizes through the Great Plains to southeast Washington, southeast Idaho, Wyoming, and Minnesota.”  The habitat is listed as:  “Open, dry places including coastal flats, weedy fields, grasslands, road edges, meadows, and hillsides” where it feeds on “Dogweed, marigold and other asters.”  Known as North America’s smallest Sulphur, this is a new species for our website.

Dainty Sulphur

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful butterfly or moth?
Location: Bellevue NE
September 8, 2012 7:01 am
This was taken in my son’s garden. It’s an 18’x13’ heart shape dedicated to his heart donor.
We live in Bellevue, Nebraska (Omaha) just one mile from the Missouri River.
Never seen it again.
Signature: Eric Zeitner

Female Orange Sulphur

Dear Eric,
What a marvelous idea for a garden dedication.  Congratulations on your son receiving a donor heart.  This lovely butterfly is a female Sulphur, most likely an Orange Sulphur,
Colias eurytheme, also known as the Alfalfa Sulphur.  Because or the light shining through the wings, the distinctive orange color is visible which is a clue to the species, and the lighter spots in the black wing borders indicates that she is a female.  You can read more about the Orange Sulphur on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location:  Laos
March 1, 2012
Another of Carol’s butterflies is a member of the family Pieridae, the Whites and Sulfurs, and we quickly identified it on Sambui Butterflies as a Chocolate Albatross,
Appias lyncida vasava.  This individual is also mud puddling.  Sambui Butterflies lists the range as:  “Sri Lanka, India and Burma through the Malay Peninsular. Other subspecies throughout the Oriental Region)” and we are still waiting for information from Carol on the location of this sighting.  According to the Butterflies of Malaysia website:  “Males congregate, sometimes in groups of 50 or more, to imbibe mineralised moisture from damp patches of ground in full sunlight. They are strongly attracted to urine soaked soil, and to mineral-rich sand on recently exposed river beaches in heavily forested areas. If disturbed they fly up in a swirling mass, but resettle to resume feeding at the same spot within a few minutes. Females are normally only seen when flying in search of egg-laying sites within the forest.”

Chocolate Albatross

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for identifying the butterfly!
The River Ou in Laos was where the riverside photos were taken.  We were between Muang La and Luang Prabang.
The caterpillar suspended across a very large open space was probably on a low mountain near a temple near Muang La, Laos.
The other photos were near the Queen’s Garden in a mountainous area near Chiang Rai or Chiang Saen in Thailand.
Where is the butterfly site you are hosting?
Carol

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug Love – Sulphur Butterflies
Location: New Canaan, CT
October 10, 2011 8:51 pm
Saw a large group of these Alfalfa Sulphur Butterflies on Zinias at the New Canaan CT Nature Center. There was a lot of mating going on. The male has solid brown rims around the edges of his wings and the female has spots in her brown wing edges. Aren’t they beautiful?! These and Cabbage Whites are the only butterflies I have seen for the last 2 weeks. I think the weather has shooed all the others away.
Signature: Hellywell

Alfalfa Sulfurs

Dear Hellywell,
Your photos of frolicking and courting Alfalfa Sulfurs or Orange Sulfurs,
Colias eurytheme, are positively charming.  Our editorial staff has fond memories of the Sulfurs flitting around the clover in the fields in Ohio, a sight that is sadly nonexistent in Los Angeles. 

Alfalfa Sulfurs

Mom in Ohio claims that zinnias are the best garden flowers for attracting butterflies.

Alfalfa Sulfurs

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination