Currently viewing the category: "Whites and Sulfurs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sad Butterfly
Location: Coryell County, Texas
November 19, 2013 12:53 am
I found this poor butterfly on the sidewalk of a shopping mall. I think it’s a Sleepy Orange. I don’t know what happened to it. Sad.
Signature: Ellen

Female Sleepy Orange

Female Sleepy Orange

Hi Ellen,
We agree that this is a Sleepy Orange,
Abaeis nicippe, a female since it lacks the band on the lower wings visible in the wing pattern of the male.  Compare this image of a mounted female Sleepy Orange on BugGuide to that of a male, also on BugGuide.  Because of the way the wings are dislocated, we suspect trauma was involved in the death of this lovely butterfly.  Based on the numerous images posted to BugGuide as well as the fine photographs of Sleepy Oranges you have submitted to us in the past, it is difficult to get a photo of the dorsal view in a living specimen.

Sleepy Orange found dead

Sleepy Orange found dead

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sleepy Orange Butterfly?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 4, 2013 7:44 pm
OK, I think this puddling butterfly may be a Sleepy Orange, but I’m not sure. I checked your archives and also Bug Guide, but this one looks so different from the ones I saw in the spring. Seasonal differences, or a different species?
So many butterflies and mud daubers enjoyed the mud today; I had to play hooky again to watch them.
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Little Yellow

Little Yellow

Hi Ellen,
Our best guess is that this is a Little Yellow,
Pyrisitia lisa, and according to BugGuide:  “Adult: small pierid with weak flight, similar to Sleepy Orange but much more yellow. Forewing upperside has broad dark margin. Hindwing underside has two basal black spots.”  According to the data on BugGuide, there seem to be more sightings in the autumn.  We are jealous that you got to play hooky.

Little Yellow

Little Yellow

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: India
July 21, 2013 8:12 pm
I saw this pretty butterfly while visiting Agra fort during summers…..could you identify it?
Signature: Nupur

Caper White

Caper White

Dear Nupur,
We found a matching image of a Caper White on Butterfly Zone, but there is no scientific name.  TrekNature identifies the Caper White as
Belenois java teutonia, and indicates:  “This butterfly has its origins in Africa where a large number of morphologically similar species occur. The butterfly belongs in the Anaphaeis subgeneric group, the name which this butterfly used to be known as. This subgroup contains members that undertake major mass migrations. In Africa the major member is Belenois(Anaphaeis) aurota which annually undertakes migrations during summer-autumn in a northeast direction.
This butterfly has historically made its way to India, and from there probably made its way via Indonesia to Australia where it is now represented by B. java.
… It is a strong migrant, and every spring, numbers of these butterflies will fly south from northern breeding grounds helped by the hot northerly winds that occur at that time. They sometimes fly over the sea reaching islands adjacent to Australia, although they have yet to make it to New Zealand. Females are both gravid and fertile during these migrations and will stop to lay eggs on hostplants if they happen upon them. The numbers in these migrations can be immense, attracting attention from the public who often think it is a plague of Cabbage Whites descending upon them.”
Several years ago, we posted some photos of a large group of Caper Whites “puddling” in Mali

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another Dainty Sulphur Butterfly?
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
April 27, 2013 4:29 pm
Beautiful butterfly seen in wildflowers today. Is it another Dainty Sulphur Butterfly? The in-flight photo is blurry, sorry. Thank you for your help.
Warm weather, 79 degrees, cloudy and humid, light scattered showers.
Signature: Ellen

Dainty Sulphur

Dainty Sulphur

Dear Ellen,
Your identification of the Dainty Sulphur,
Nathalis iole, is correct.  Even though the open winged photo is blurry, it still shows the markings on this lovely little butterfly.  Spread wing photos of this species are not easily taken, and even BugGuide only has a few.  We are very grateful to be able to post your two views of a Dainty Sulphur.

Dainty Sulphur

Dainty Sulphur


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Checkered White Butterfly?
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
March 18, 2013 3:12 pm
Hi again. Yes, I totally played hooky for awhile this afternoon. 😉 Is this a Checkered White Butterfly? I’ve been chasing the white butterflies for awhile. They flutter gently away whenever I approach, camera in hand. Here is a Bug Guide reference: http://bugguide.net/node/view/3556
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Checkered White

Checkered White

Hi Ellen,
We are trying to post as many of your butterfly images as we can this evening, including this Checkered White.  We envy your ability to play hooky.

Checkered White

Checkered White

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This might be a Dainty Sulphur Butterfly
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
February 5, 2013 4:46 pm
Hello,
Wish I could have captured clearer photos of this tiny butterfly. It’s quick! Is it a Nathalis iole, a Dainty Sulphur butterfly? Gorgeous warm weather in the seventies today. I’m not sure if these are the same individual, but I believe they are the same species. Thank you.
Signature: Ellen

Dainty Sulphur

Dear Ellen,
We are thrilled to post your photos of a Dainty Sulphur or Dwarf Yellow Sulphur,
Nathalis iole.  We know first hand how difficult it can be to photograph the Dainty Sulphur.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination