Currently viewing the category: "Whites and Sulfurs"
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Subject: Butterfly ID
Location: Northern Spain
July 28, 2017 8:44 am
Hi Guy’s,
I took these images in Northern Spain in June but I can’t identify them, can you help.
Signature: Tony Mellor UK

Bath White

Dear Tony,
Your butterfly images represent multiple families, consequently, we will take them one at a time so as not to create too much confusion in our archiving process.  One file was labeled Bath White, and upon researching that, we agree with your identification thanks to this image of
 Pontia daplidice on UK Butterflies where it states:  “This is an extremely scarce immigrant to the British Isles and, in some years, is not seen at all. However, on occasion, it does appear in large numbers, such as the great immigration of 1945. The first specimen was recorded in the British Isles in the late 17th century. Between 1850 and 1939 there were very few records, with only a few years reaching double figures. The exception was 1906 when several hundred were supposedly seen on the cliffs at Durdle Door, Dorset, although these records are considered suspect. The great years for this species, however, were between 1944 and 1950, with over 700 seen in 1945, mostly in Cornwall. This species has been extremely scarce ever since with less than 20 individuals recorded since 1952. It is believed that this species cannot survive our winter although some offspring resulting from the 1945 invasion may have survived into the following year. In the British Isles the species was potentially capable of producing 2 or 3 broods in good years.
The butterfly was originally known as “Vernon’s Half Mourner” after the first recognised capture by William Vernon in Cambridgeshire in May 1702, although earlier records are now known. However, the common name of this butterfly comes from a piece of needlework that figures this species, supposedly showing a specimen taken in or near Bath in 1795, and the name seems to have “stuck”. This species is a rare migrant to the British Isles. Although most records come from the south coast of England, this species has been reported as far north as Lincolnshire and Yorkshire in England, and also in County Wexford, south east Ireland (a record from 1893).”
According to Learn About Butterflies:  “
Pontia is represented in all continents except North America and Australasia. The most widespread and abundant species is daplidice. It occurs in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, the Canary Islands and over most of Europe. … The butterfly is also recorded as a rare vagrant in southern Britain.”

Daniel thanks for the very detailed reply. I thought it was a bath white but it’s probiscus didn’t look right, it seemed to have a forked growth on it, that’s why u sent it to you.
Regards

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Subject: Moth?
Location: Poland
January 5, 2017 8:01 pm
Saw this in my kitchen this evening. It’s January in Maine. Found it to be a bit odd to be out this time of year. Any idea what it is? It thought Cabbage moth, but it has grey swirls, not a spot on the wing.
Signature: Jim

Cabbage White

Dear Jim,
This is not a moth, it is a butterfly.  Though the white spot on the forewing is not visible in your image, we are pretty confident this is a male Cabbage White, a species introduced to North America from Europe over 100 years ago.  See this BugGuide image for comparison. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow butterfly
Location: Ontario
November 26, 2016 9:16 am
Hi,
We found both of these (same butterfly) in the house, it’s white yellow with a few spots. Can you tell me what it is?
Thanks
Signature: Marie-Eve

Cabbage Whites

Cabbage Whites

Dear Marie-Eve,
These pretty little butterflies are Cabbage Whites, a European species thought to have been introduced into North America in the 19th Century.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced accidentally near Montreal in the 1860s, this species has become an important pest. Bacterial and viral diseases now provide some biological control.”  Caterpillars feed on cabbage and many other plants in the same family.

Cabbage Whites

Cabbage White

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another Sulphur Butterfly 🙂
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 10, 2016 8:32 pm
Another morning of gardening, another beautiful yellow butterfly visiting the Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii). I wish I could capture how beautiful these butterflies are! It’s tough for me to get the yellows and whites to show as more than bright blurs in the sunshine.
I think this is another Sulphur, but can’t tell which species.
Such gorgeous weather, 70’s to 80’s, no rain this week.
Thank you for all of your help throughout the months, seasons and years!
Signature: Ellen

Male Cloudless Sulphur

Male Cloudless Sulphur

Dear Ellen,
This individual is a male Cloudless Sulphur,
Phoebis sennae, which you can verify by comparing to this BugGuide image.  Interestingly, it appears to be nectaring from the same type of sage plant.  According to BugGuide:  “upperside of male wings lemon yellow or pale greenish-yellow with no markings; female forewing with small dark spot, usually a narrow blackish outer margin, and a few vague dark dots near tip. Underside of hindwing with two silver black-rimmed spots in both sexes.”  Your one image nicely illustrates the “male wings lemon yellow or pale greenish-yellow with no markings.”  We suspect the appearance of this male Cloudless Sulphur is a good indication that the image you submitted last week is a female Cloudless Sulphur.  Butterflies in motion can be difficult to capture in images, but we think you are doing a marvelous job and your images are a good indication of the patience you have with your uncooperative subjects.  

Male Cloudless Sulphur

Male Cloudless Sulphur

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Butterfly
Location: West Los Angeles
October 9, 2016 4:11 pm
These have been around the backyard for years but they don’t usually sit still long enough to grab the camera to take a picture. This picture was taken 10-9-16 in in West Los Angeles area. The flower is a Cape Marigold and this particular butterfly seems attracted to only the yellow flowers of that plant.
Signature: Phil Hackett

Cloudless Sulphur

Cloudless Sulphur

Hi Phil,
This is one of the Sulphur butterflies in the genus
Phoebis, and we are pretty certain it is the Cloudless Sulphur, Phoebis sennae.  This is a very fast flying species, and it is our experience that they are difficult to approach, so your images are a marvelous addition to our site.  According to BugGuide:  “upperside of male wings lemon yellow or pale greenish-yellow with no markings; female forewing with small dark spot, usually a narrow blackish outer margin, and a few vague dark dots near tip. Underside of hindwing with two silver black-rimmed spots in both sexes.”

Cloudless Sulphur

Cloudless Sulphur

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Butterfly, a Cloudless Sulphur, perhaps?
Location: Coryell County
October 8, 2016 7:04 pm
Hello again!
Many butterflies today. I think this may be a Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae), but I’m not sure. Thes are quite large, and only visit the salvia greggi (Autumn sage), ignoring the other flowers in the garden. I believe you identified a similar butterfly for me several years ago, thank you!
Best wishes for a great autumn!
Signature: ellen

Sulphur, but which species?

Probably Female Cloudless Sulphur

Dear Ellen,
You are correct that this is a Sulphur in the genus
Pheobis, but we cannot say for certain which species.  Your individual does resemble the Cloudless Sulphur in this BugGuide image, but it also resembles this Orange Barred Sulphur, also pictured on BugGuide.  Unfortunately, the open-winged image you provided is lacking in critical detail.

Update
Subject: Sulphur: Cloudless or Orange-Barred? Part II
Location: Coryell County, TX
October 10, 2016 9:17 pm
Hello again! Thank you for your quick response. I saw the entry of the Cloudless Sulphur from Los Angeles, so beautiful.
I found this article on Orange-Barred Sulphurs (found now in California) and thought it was so interesting: http://www.monarchprogram.org/new-butterfly-species-in-the-southwest-the-orange-barred-sulfur-phoebis-philea/
I looked back at my photos and realized that, although too blurry, these show the sunlit color of the butterfly in question. It was lemon yellow, no orange that I ever spotted; I don’t know if that makes a difference or not. Gorgeous butterfly on the wing. Will keep trying to get clearer photos of the insects in our gardens.
Love your site! Thank you so much for all of the information.
Signature: Ellen

Cloudless Sulphur

Cloudless Sulphur

Hi again Ellen,
Thanks for the update.  We believe based on the images you just submitted of a male Cloudless Sulphur, that this is a female of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination