Currently viewing the category: "swallowtails"

Subject: Pipevine Swallowtail?
Location: Coryell County, TX
November 1, 2016 1:46 pm
Hello, I’m seeing these beautiful butterflies again, almost exactly a year since I last noticed them. I think they are Pipevine Swallowtails. Some others have more blue iridescence when their wings are opened than this beauty; you had said that the ones that are more blue are likely males.
The plant is Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii), and the red variety remains the most popular with the butterflies. I think a dried petal landed on the butterfly’s wings in some of the photos.
Signature: Ellen

Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail

Hi Ellen,
Your most recent images of a Pipevine Swallowtail are lovely, and we really continue to enjoy the detailed sighting descriptions you always provide.

Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail

Subject: Great Swallowtail
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 12, 2016 1:27 pm
Hello again! I thought you might like to see this Great Swallowtail, photographed through the window as it visited a hanging basket of Portulaca flowers today. (Used auto-correct for the photos as they had a haze.) Of course the butterfly flew off as I s-l-o-w-l-y opened the door, as always. 😀
Hope you are both well.
Signature: Ellen

Giant Swallowtail

Giant Swallowtail

Good Morning Ellen,
Thanks so much for sending us a new image of a Giant Swallowtail, not a Great Swallowtail, which to the best of our knowledge is not a recognized common name.

October 12, 2016 1:34 pm
I’m so sorry, I meant to write Giant Swallowtail. I think it’s a Giant Swallowtail as you’ve very kindly identified them for me before. Hope you’re having a great week! Thank you
Signature: Ellen

Update:  October 16, 2016
Subject: More Giant Swallowtails
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 16, 2016 3:00 pm
I’ve never seen as many Giant Swallowtails near our house as I have this month. We did have some summer rain, which is unusual, so their host plants may be thriving. The pictured plants are natives, Texas Rock Rose (Pavonia lasiopetala) and Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii). I’m not sure if these are of the same individual butterfly. The swallowtails seem to be patrolling the gardens.
Signature: Ellen

Giant Swallowtail

Giant Swallowtail

Dear Ellen,
Thanks for the update on your Giant Swallowtail sightings.  That head on view of the Giant Swallowtail flying towards the camera is amazing.

Giant Swallowtail

Giant Swallowtail

Giant Swallowtail

Giant Swallowtail

Subject: unknown insect attacking butterfly
Location: Forest Road 22 at Brice Creek east of Cottage Grove, Oregon
September 22, 2016 3:39 pm
Taking pictures of a Clodius Parnassian butterfly when I saw some winged insect attempting to land on the butterfly’s abdomen. I shooed it away from the butterfly. Later when I was checking my photos I found that I had actually snapped it while it was just about to land on the butterfly. The closest I could come to a partial ID is some kind of carpenter ant. Just don’t know if the size is a match and it is actually something else.
Signature: G Price

Parnassus Butterfly and Beetle

Parnassus Butterfly and Beetle

Dear G Price,
This is some species of Beetle, probably a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  Unfortunately, there is not enough detail for us to determine a species.  We do not think it is attaching this lovely Clodius Parnassian, but rather, more of an accidental encounter.  We have so few examples of Parnassian Butterflies on our site.

Thanks for the tip.  Maybe next year I’ll be able to get a better
capture of it when I’m in the area again.   Feel free to add the
Parnassian to your group if you’d like.

Subject: Easter tiger swallowtail, light and dark
Location: Troy, VA
September 16, 2016 11:55 am
I thought you might like these photos I took of female Eastern tiger swallowtails in their light and dark variations. A couple of weeks ago when the Joe Pye weed was blooming we had an extraordinary display of butterflies, particularly swallowtails. If people want to know how to attract butterflies, get some native weeds.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Female Tiger Swallowtail: Dark Form

Female Tiger Swallowtail: Dark Form

Dear Grace,
We love your images of dark and light female Tiger Swallowtails, and we totally agree about Joe Pye Weed, Goldenrod, Milkweed and other native plants being perfect for attracting butterflies.  We hope you will be able to provide us with an image of a male Tiger Swallowtail in the near future.  We managed to get a few images several summers past of a very wary male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, who can be recognized because of the absence of blue coloration on the lower wings.

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Subject: Male tiger swallowtails
Location: Troy, VA
September 17, 2016 10:30 am
Hi Daniel,
I went through my photos and only had a couple of images with males. They were either not as plentiful as the females, or they were shyer. In two of the images you can see ailanthus webworm moths and in one the webworm moth and a skipper. I haven’t seen any swallowtails lately, so I don’t know if I will be able to get any other images. I hope you like these. What I have been seeing lately are skippers and crescent moths.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Hi Grace,
Thanks so much for rounding out your Eastern Tiger Swallowtail posting with a few images of the male, who lacks the blue scales on his lower wings.

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail with Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail with Ailanthus Webworm Moth

 

Subject: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Location: Perinton, NY
August 15, 2016 6:42 pm
Hi! Here are some pics of an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on the right-of-way behind our home. I believe it’s a male, as I didn’t see any blue on the hind wings. We’ve had an amazing variety of butterflies here this year, more than in years past. Enjoy!
Signature: Jennifer

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

Hi Jennifer,
You surely are providing us with some wonderful eastern butterfly images.  Because of your location, we cannot say for certain that this is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail,
Papilio glaucus glaucus, since the range of the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio canadensis, can be as far south as Pennsylvania.  The two species look very similar and this BugGuide differentiation and description of the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail “adult: inner margin of hindwing has wide black stripe (whereas the otherwise similar – though larger – Eastern Tiger Swallowtail has a thin black stripe in that area)” seems vague, as does the comparison of images on the Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility site.  We do agree it is a male.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a more concrete species call than we are able to provide.

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we will concur that this is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail.

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

Subject: Black or Spicebush Swallowtail?
Location: Perinton, NY
August 15, 2016 6:31 pm
Hi! This beauty was enjoying the thistles on the right-of-way behind our home. I apologize, I could only get closed wing shots, as it wouldn’t sit still for long! From what I can tell from Google, it looks like a Spicebush, but after viewing your website, I could be wrong. Thanks for any help you can give me! (Both photos are if the same individual )
Signature: Jennifer

Spicebush Swallowtail

Spicebush Swallowtail

Dear Jennifer,
This is a Spicebush Swallowtail,
Papilio troilus, which is described on BugGuide as:  “Adult: Upper surface of forewing is mostly black with ivory spots along margin. Upper surface of hindwing has orange spot on costal margin and sheen of bluish (female) or bluish-green (male) scales. Underside of hindwing with pale green marginal spots.(1) Median spotband on underside of hindwing missing one orange spot.”  The missing orange spot is visible in your image.  If you notice the inner band of spots, where the third from the bottom should exist, there is instead a dusting of blue-green scales that matches the pattern on this BugGuide image of a Spicebush Swallowtail, as opposed to this BugGuide image of a Black Swallowtail.