Currently viewing the category: "Skippers"
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Subject: Skipper, Comma or Question Mark?
Location: Decatur GA
September 23, 2012 11:30 am
Hi! Love the site! I got some great shots of this guy on my lantana today (9.23.12). Can you help me ID it? I’m leaning towards skipper. What do you think?
Signature: Angela Pratt

Skipper

Hi Angela,
This is a Skipper in the family Hesperiidae.  The manner in which it holds its wings is very typical of Skippers, especially the Grass Skippers in the subfamily .  See BugGuide for additional information as well as for photographs of many of the species found in North America.  You may also browse through the numerous genera of Grass Skippers on BugGuide in an attempt to identify this Skipper to the species level.

Skipper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: swallow tail moth?
Location: 3 miles W. of Wagram, NC (NC Sandhills)
September 12, 2012 10:58 am
I saw this fellow on my buddlea bush and am at loss to identify him. He has an iridescent blue back and a fairly pronounced swallow tail.
Signature: Bill Ingle

Long-Tailed Skipper

Hi Bill,
This Long-Tailed Skipper,
Urbanus proteus, is actually a butterfly and not a moth, though Skippers are generally classified as a transitional group of butterflies that shares many characteristics with moth.  According to BugGuide the range of the Long-Tailed Skipper is “‘Argentina north through Central America, the West Indies, and Mexico to peninsular Florida and South Texas. Occasionally strays and colonizes north to Connecticut, southern Illinois, eastern Kansas, southern Arizona, and southern California.’ (Butterflies and Moths of North America).”

Bless your heart!  Thank you so much!
They haven’t been seen in this area before, but we’ll be watching for them.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Libellula & Polites Mystic
Location: Niagara, ON
May 30, 2012 2:44 pm
Hello,
I’ve been able to identify this as a libellula, but haven’t been able to get it down any narrower. He seems to be lacking the brown wingtips of the Widow skimmer you show on your site. I read in a past post that dragonflies aren’t that easy to identify to the species level, but thought I would share this photo as I’m rather pleased with how it turned out. He was a very patient model!
I’m also attaching a photo of what I believe to be either polites peckius (Peck’s Skipper) or polites mystic (Long Dash). This tiny little butterfly and the dragonfly were hanging out together on a sunny afternoon in a patch of wild phlox.
You’re welcome to use one or both photos for your site if you wish.
Signature: Alison

Long Dash Skipper or Peck’s Skipper

Hi Alison,
We are posting your letter with the Long Dash Skipper photo, but we cannot verify for certain if your identification is correct.  We trust that it is.  We will post the Dragonfly at a later date.  Also, we are postdating this to go live on our site during our brief holiday.

Ed. Note:  We have just received a comment from Mona that this is a Peck’s Skipper.  We cannot verify for certain, but in the interest of providing possible identifications, we are linking to the Butterflies and Moths of North America website.

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i don’t think you have one of these on your website
location:  Boulder, Colorado
May 13, 2012
hi there,
i have been so excited to be seeing these two banded checkered skippers this year. they are considered uncommon so it is even more fun to see them. i have seen 9 so far this spring here in the mountains west of boulder colorado. i started seeing them in mid april and still saw one flying on may 10th. i am seeing them on the old switzerland trail about a mile in from the peak to peak hwy. 6 miles north of nederland. i had to rescue one who was dehydrated. i put him on the damp gravel next to a small puddle and he got his drink and was fine. i am pretty certain of his id as i have gotten some nice photo’s of the ventral side as well as the dorsal. he has the redish color on the ventral that distinguishes him from the mountain checkered skipper. anyway i hope you can use this photo on your sight. i so love your website and appreciate what you are doing.
thanks so  much, venice kelly
oh i forgot to say how tiny these butterflies are. they are about 5/8 of an inch. so the photo is quite enlarged.

Two-Banded Checkered Skipper

Hi Venice,
Thanks so much for sending us your photo of a Two-Banded Checkered Skipper,
Pyrgus ruralis.  According to BugGuide:  “Inconspicuous, usually local and uncommon. Flies in the northwestern U.S. reaching to southern California, Arizona, and New Mexico. Flies in Canada reaching only in Alberta north to Nordegg, southern British Columbia north to Yoho National Park, and on southern and central Vancouver Island.”  If you can send us the photo of the underside, we will post it as well.

hi daniel
here is the ventral view of the two banded checkered skipper. such a pretty little thing.
so glad you can use the photo’s on your web site.
thanks so much, venice

Two Banded Skipper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown Moth
Location: Jacksonville, FL
January 29, 2012 10:33 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this lovely moth, in a screened patio. It has a lovely subtle green shade on the body and rear wings. I thought it would be easily identified by the ”tail”, but I’m proving myself wrong. :}
I love finding and photographing insects!!
Signature: Dan

Long Tailed Skipper

Hi Dan,
Though it looks somewhat moth-like, the Long Tailed Skipper
Urbanus proteus, is actually a butterfly.  Skippers are generally considered to be a transitional species between butterflies and moths, though they are classified as butterflies.

Long Tailed Skipper

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What is this butterflies called
Location: Austin, Texas
January 24, 2012 9:54 am
I have taken a picture of two butterflies and will like to know what kind are they, and if they are mating or are co-joined together. thank you for your help
Signature: Mauricio Alvarez

Checkered Skippers Mating

Dear Mauricio,
These Common Checkered Skippers, Pyrgus communis, which we believe we correctly identified on BugGuide, are in fact mating.
  BugGuide indicates:  “Larvae feed on mallows (Malvaceae), including Althea, Abutilon, Malva.  Adults take nectar.”  Thanks for sending these great photos, and we are especially happy that you show both the upper and under views of the wings.

Mating Common Checkered Skippers

Thank you very much for your help. Feel free to use those pictures in your website.
Mauricio

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination