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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lycaenidae Butterfly
Location: Grete, Greece
July 4, 2014 1:47 pm
Dear “what’s the bug”
I have been for a long time trying to identify this butterfly. I tend to believe that it is a common blue (Polyommatus icarus) but I am not sure, because the spots are not that clear. Could you please help me identify it? It was photographed in the island of Crete, Greece in 16 March 2013. The habitat was brushwood under heavy grazing pressure.
Thanks a lot in advance
Signature: Thanasis

Blue

Blue

Dear Thanasis,
Blues are a very difficult group for us to identity, but we are posting your images and we will do the research.  Meanwhile, perhaps one of our readers who is more familiar with the Lycaean Blues will write in and assist in the identification.

Grecian Blue

Grecian Blue

Dear Daniel Marlos,
thank you very much for your immediate reply. I’m grateful for your help, and I hope that there will be a solution (it’s been more than a year that a have not succeeded to ID this butterfly.)
Best Regards,
Thanasis

Hi again Thanasis,
Many times we get comments that identify a species from long ago in our archives, and we are no longer able to contact the person who submitted the request, so we would advise you to place a comment on the posting to connect you to people who may write in in the future.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Western Pygmy Blue
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 24, 2014 5:00 PM
While taking some images of the California Harvester Ants, we noticed a butterfly so small it could only be a Western Pygmy Blue.  Our images are not as nice as Anna’s are, but they do document this lovely diminutive butterfly in Mount Washington.

Western Pygmy Blue

Western Pygmy Blue

The Western Pygmy Blue is the smallest butterfly in North America.

Western Pygmy Blue

Western Pygmy Blue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterflies in fire pit
Location: Idaho City, Idaho
May 9, 2014 2:39 pm
My friend found these butterflies flocking to an old fire pit near Idaho City, Idaho. We’re curious to know what species they are and why they have such an interest in charred wood? In my Google searches, I came across a YouTube video of what looked like hundreds of these same type of butterflies in someone else’s fire pit. Apparently, what my friend witnessed wasn’t an isolated phenomenon, but I was unable to find any real answers. Thanks for any help you can give us.
Signature: Hanna

Echo Azures in a Fire Pit

Echo Azures in a Fire Pit

Dear Hanna,
These are Blues in the subfamily Polyommatinae, and we believe we have correctly identified them as Echo Azures,
Celastrina echo, thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it states:  “Most western Azures have been classified as belonging to this species name. Where this species and more easterly ranging species meet, and how to tell them apart is not well presented in literature as of yet.”  We also believe we have a good hypothesis as to why they are in the fire pit.  We suspect this was a night time fire that was doused with water and that the Echo Azures were drinking the moisture left behind the next day.  Many male butterflies, most notably Blues and Swallowtails, gather at sites of moisture to drink and take advatage of minerals found at the puddle, an activity known as mud puddling or just puddling.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Cooper Mt. Washington County, Oregon
May 9, 2014 8:37 am
WTB,
My friends and I took photos of this butterfly and are having trouble finding the species. There was a pair in a meadow at Cooper Mt., Washington County, Oregon, about 500 ft. elevation. We are using The Guide to Butterflies of Oregon and Washington by William Neill. We looked at field marks and host plants. Any information you can give us will be greatly appreciated.
We are birders, with basic wildflower ID abilities. We are working to add butterflies and bugs to our repertoire.
Thank you,
Signature: Judi Dodson

Silvery Blue

Silvery Blue

Dear Judi,
Your butterfly is one of the Blues in the subfamily Polyommatinae and we believe we have correctly identified it as a Silvery Blue, Glaucopsyche lygdamus, thanks to the images posted to BugGuide, where it is described as having:  “Underside gray-brown; both wings with row of white-ringed, round black spots. “

Daniel,
Thank you so much.  And I appreciate the link to BugGuide.  We will definitely be using their information. I’ll also be sending the link to What’s That Bug to my friends.
Judi Dodson

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterflies
Location: Eastern Tennessee
April 3, 2014 11:39 am
HI,
These beauties were in abundance on April 2nd in the Martha Sundquist State Forest, and I would love to know what they are.
Thank you for your time,
Signature: R.G. Marion

Puddling Lycaean Blues

Puddling Lycaean Blues

Dear R.G. Marion,
The best we can do at this moment is to provide a subfamily.  These are Lycaean Blues in the subfamily Polyommatinae, and according to BugGuide they might be considered as a tribe.
  There are many similar looking species and subspecies classified as Blues.  The Lycaean Blues were among author Vladimir Nabokov’s favorite butterflies, and he wrote about clouds of Blues gathering at puddles in the spring, exactly what your image documents.

Thank you so much for your timely reply; it is most appreciated.
R.G.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – Help with Small Butterfly ID?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
August 27, 2013 3:08 pm
Hi Daniel,
First, I must say I’ve opened your site using google chrome and like the results much better than when using my default IE browser. Hopefully your webmaster will be able to make the site more IE friendly soon?
I am pretty sure I have photographed the attached butterfly in past, but can’t find the name now. With my naked, not so good eyes, it looked like a Marine Blue but it is not. Can you help, please? The China Aster it is feeding on is a small bloom, only about 1.5” in diameter.
Signature: Thank you, Anna Carreon

Acmon Blue female

Acmon Blue female

Hi Anna,
We are happy to hear that your browser issues have improved.  This looks to us to be a female Acmon Blue and you can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.  We used Jeffrey Glassberg’s Butterflies Through Binoculars, The West for our initial identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination