Currently viewing the category: "Gossamer Wings"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Butterfly
May 25, 2010
Hello Daniel,
I haven’t been able to ID this little butterfly after looking through 35 pages of butterflies on your website. (What a treat, butterflies are my favorite) Can you help with its ID? Sorry I couldn’t get a photo with open wings, which may have made IDing a bit easier. Thank you for everything.
Richard
North Middle Tennessee

Hairstreak

Hi Richard,
It is a Hairstreak, but since we are late for work, we can’t look up species right now.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/383/bgimage

Thank you Daniel,  for taking the time to answer my butterfly request. Hairstreak narrows it down close enough for me, please don’t go to a lot of trouble searching for the sub species for me. I know you are busy and I don’t want to take up any of your valuable time. Thanks again and have a wonderful day.
Richard

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beautiful Butterfly
May 11, 2010
My 4 year old son and I found and caught this guy in my backyard. I’ve never seen a butterfly with these colors and markings before. He seemed to be having trouble flying, so we gently scooped him up and moved him onto a potted plant, where he’s been content to hang out for hours now. We’re in northern Florida near wetlands (St. John’s River). Can you help us identify?
Curious Dad
Orange Park, FL

Great Purple Hairstreak

Dear Curious Dad,
Though the Great Purple Hairstreak, Atlides halesus, ranges as far north as New York, Oregon and Illinois, according to BugGuide, it only breeds in the Southern states.  Most of our reports come from Florida, though we have also gotten photos from Texas.  The presence of the iridescent blue patch on the underside of the forewing identifies this as a male, though in two of your images, that patch is not visible.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth on Hybiscus bud
April 9, 2010
Hi Daniel,
Here is a picture of a moth on my hybiscus. It appears to use the small tips on the end of it’s wings to to touch the flower bud. I think it was eating the afids.
Any idea what kind of moth it is?
Mike Healy
central Florida

Gray Hairstreak

Hi Mike,
This is not a moth, but a butterfly, more specifically, a Gray Hairstreak, Strymon melinus which may be viewed on BugGuide.  Your Gray Hairstreak is not feeding on Aphids.  All butterflies and moths that feed subsist on a strictly liquid diet, with most species taking nectar, though some feed on fermented fruit, sap and occasionally carrion and other unusual fare.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Swallowtail butterfly?
October 19, 2009
I’ve had a difficult time identifying this butterfly. It has markings similar to a Pipvine Swallowtail, but not close enough for a positive ID. Observed 10-18-2009 in Central Texas. Can you help?
Regards
Ed Sparks
McKinney Falls St. Park, Austin TX

Great Purple Hairstreak

Great Purple Hairstreak

Hi Ed,
Your lovely little butterfly is much too small to be a swallowtail.  It is a Great Purple Hairstreak.  Your photo is exquisite.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for the kind words.  What a magnificent butterfly!  It never opened its wings on the flower, so I never saw the beautiful colors on its back.
Thank you for the identification!
Regards,
Ed Sparks
Austin, TX

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Lynx Lunch
August 31, 2009
I know that this is a green lynx with a moth, but I thought the picture was a good one. Everyone I show it to says something like “ewwww, or thanks for the nightmares” so I thought I’d show it to someone who would appreciate it. 🙂
I also snapped a shot of her boyfriend who was a couple leaves away from her on the rosebush.
Kelli the spider lover
San Marcos (San Diego County) CA

Green Lynx Spider eats Hairstreak Butterfly

Green Lynx Spider eats Hairstreak Butterfly

Dear Kelli the spider lover,
The prey in your photo is actually one of the Hairstreak Butterflies and not a moth.  Green Lynx Spiders do not build a web to capture prey, but rather ambush flying insects from a tall perch, like a blossom on a rose bush.

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

possibly a skipper
August 15, 2009
Hello, this was on a eupatorium perfoliatium. I could probably look through books and find it but am being lazy. If you don’t have time I will understand.
thank you, Louise
Orefield, PA 18069 USA

Gray Hairstreak

Gray Hairstreak

Hi Louise,
Your butterfly is a Gray Hairstreak, Strymon melinus.  According to BugGuide:  “Food  Caterpillar hosts: Flowers and fruits from an almost endless variety of (usually) herbaceous plants; most often from pea (Fabaceae) and mallow (Malvaceae) families including beans (Phaseolus), clovers (Trifolium), cotton (Gossypium), and mallow (Malva).
Adult food: Nectar from many flower species including dogbane, milkweed, mint, winter cress, goldenrod, tick trefoil, and white sweet clover.
Life Cycle  Males perch all afternoon on small trees and shrubs to seek receptive females. Eggs are laid singly on flowers of host plant. Young caterpillars feed on flowers and fruits; older ones may eat leaves. Caterpillars are sometimes attended by ants–they receive a sugary solution from the dorsal nectary organ (Idaho Museum of Natural History, BugGuide photos). Chrysalids hibernate.
RemarksThe most widespread hairstreak in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination