Currently viewing the category: "Gossamer Wings"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Lynx Lunch
August 31, 2009
I know that this is a green lynx with a moth, but I thought the picture was a good one. Everyone I show it to says something like “ewwww, or thanks for the nightmares” so I thought I’d show it to someone who would appreciate it. 🙂
I also snapped a shot of her boyfriend who was a couple leaves away from her on the rosebush.
Kelli the spider lover
San Marcos (San Diego County) CA

Green Lynx Spider eats Hairstreak Butterfly

Green Lynx Spider eats Hairstreak Butterfly

Dear Kelli the spider lover,
The prey in your photo is actually one of the Hairstreak Butterflies and not a moth.  Green Lynx Spiders do not build a web to capture prey, but rather ambush flying insects from a tall perch, like a blossom on a rose bush.

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

possibly a skipper
August 15, 2009
Hello, this was on a eupatorium perfoliatium. I could probably look through books and find it but am being lazy. If you don’t have time I will understand.
thank you, Louise
Orefield, PA 18069 USA

Gray Hairstreak

Gray Hairstreak

Hi Louise,
Your butterfly is a Gray Hairstreak, Strymon melinus.  According to BugGuide:  “Food  Caterpillar hosts: Flowers and fruits from an almost endless variety of (usually) herbaceous plants; most often from pea (Fabaceae) and mallow (Malvaceae) families including beans (Phaseolus), clovers (Trifolium), cotton (Gossypium), and mallow (Malva).
Adult food: Nectar from many flower species including dogbane, milkweed, mint, winter cress, goldenrod, tick trefoil, and white sweet clover.
Life Cycle  Males perch all afternoon on small trees and shrubs to seek receptive females. Eggs are laid singly on flowers of host plant. Young caterpillars feed on flowers and fruits; older ones may eat leaves. Caterpillars are sometimes attended by ants–they receive a sugary solution from the dorsal nectary organ (Idaho Museum of Natural History, BugGuide photos). Chrysalids hibernate.
RemarksThe most widespread hairstreak in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

odd looking butterfly
July 30, 2009
Found what I think is a butterfly on one of our sunflowers today. It has what appears to be 2 bodies sticking out of its back.
Chris
Conroe Tx

Hairstreak

Hairstreak

Hi Chris,
This is some species of Hairstreak in the subfamilyTheclinae of the Gossamer Wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Grey Butterfly and inchworm. Related?
July 12, 2009
This butterfly caught my eye because as it landed on my eggplant, it moved its back wings back and forth to flash this set of brightly colored orange spots. I’ve never seen this type of butterfly before, and this is also the first year I’ve had inchworms in my garden. Are they related? I also don’t know if these inch worms are good or bad, I maintain an organic garden, but they have destroyed a whole head of lettuce in a single day, is there another plant they might like to eat instead so I don’t have to kill them?
Back yard gardener
Southern California, Mojave Desert Region

Gray Hairstreak

Gray Hairstreak

Dear Gardener,
Your lovely butterfly is a Gray Hairstreak, Strymon melinus.  This is a wide ranging species that has caterpillars that feed on a variety of plants.  It is unrelated to the inchworm, which is the caterpillar of a Geometrid Moth.  Though we promote tolerance for insects, we have a major problem when certain species feed on our garden produce.  We don’t think twice about squashing caterpillars that proliferate on our leafy greens.  One or two caterpillars we would tolerate, but droves must go.  We actually allow the White Lined Sphinx Caterpillars to feed on our fuchsia, but we do not like eating lettuce or collards that have holes and caterpillar droppings on them.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Butterfly ID requested
July 10, 2009
Butterfly ID requested
Can someone tell me what this butterfly is? I photographed it in June near Zilnia, Slovakia in Europe. Both photos are of the insect. Thank you.
Jim Zuckerman
Zilnia, Slovakia

Silver Studded Blue

Silver Studded Blue

Dear Jim,
What we could say before doing any research is that your butterfly is a Gossamer Winged Butterfly in the family Lycaenidae and the subfamily Polyommatinae.  Now that we have a brand new computer, our internet research is so much faster.  We quickly tentatively identified your butterfly as a Silver Studded Blue, Plebejus (Plebeius) argus, on the Butterflies of Europe and North Africa website.  The bright blue coloration indicates a male.  Sadly, we cannot link directly to the image on the previous site, but the Butterflies of Norway site has mounted specimens.  They are not as pretty as the living specimens.

Silver Studded Blue

Silver Studded Blue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Need ID for Neo tropical Conservation Project
Sat, May 30, 2009 at 6:13 PM
I won t post any photos here as there are too many but all of them are visible on flickr at:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigal_river_conservation_project_ecuador/sets/
If anybody can help in narowing some of the identifications, it would be greatly appreciated. The place is also available for research. Thanks in advance.
Thierry
ecuador eastern slopes

Imperial Sunstreak

Imperial Sunstreak

Dear Thierry,
We almost didn’t open your email because at this time of year, we get numerous requests from lazy students who realize their entomology identification projects are due. They send us blurry photos and frantic requests so they don’t flunk their classes. Needless to say, we ignore those requests. Your project has us fascinated, and we wish we had the time to research the 100s of unknown specimens represented by your photographs. We are happy to post the link http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigal_river_conservation_project_ecuador/sets/ to your project in the event any of our readers want to take a stab at assisting you. If nothing else, our readers should enjoy scanning through your wonderful images. We are taking the liberty of posting an image of an Imperial Sunstreak, Arcas imperialis, and the accompanying text:
“Imperial Arcas, Imperial Sunstreak- Mariposa Brillante- October 2008-
Thanks Kim Garwood for IDing this!
…This Imperial Sunstreak is a spledid butterfly that lives from Mexico to Bolivia, in Colombia from sea level to 1500 masl. Some of the butterflies of this family have some hairy tails that they move constantly so the predators will get confused and if they bite they won´t do it in the head. Forewing average 20-22 mm. “

Dear Mr Marlos.
Thanks for your kind words and your support. The link you posted on you website is an honour for us and will prove to be of a great help. I didn t know entomology students could be lazy (endless biodiversity in that field can’t afford lazyness!), but I guess they are like any other students… I think I owe you a presentation so here we go:
My name is Thierry Garcia, Executive Director of the Sumac Muyu Foundation from Ecuador.
We are running a Conservation Project in Ecuador (the Bigal River Conservation Project), in the Amazon part of the Country, about 60 km from the city of Coca, at an altitude between 450 m and 1100 m above sea level. We are trying to protect 2500 acres of primary forest and its biodiversity and as the area is bordering Sumaco National Park, it is a major buffer zone. The Reserve is community owned and we are struggling everyday to get more and more local individuals involved in conservation and sustainable use of natural resources.
The place is still pristine because of its remoteness, biodiversity is at its highest, it is covered with lush primary rainforest bordering Sumaco National Park, one of the less explored National Park in the country, and our first goal is to keep it this way.
I would also like to put across the fact that it is not a business we are trying to run here or another expensive jungle lodge, but a true Conservation Project based on education in the local communities, scientific research, and poverty eradication, through environmental awareness. Eco tourism will be used as a last resort to generate funds and salaries for the locals and, if implemented, it will be subject to strict regulation in order to minimize the impact on the ecosystem.
You can also visit our website for pictures and other info (in Spanish, English or French) at:
http://reservadelriobigal.googlepages.com/
We are currently looking for a partnership (long or short term) involving research with a University or any other Organization in order to help us manage the place’s biodiversity in the best way as possible and to improve scientific knowledge of the area which is hardly inexistent. Needless to say, chances of discovering new species are high and that this place is in need of urgent protection, this is why we are looking for any kind of way to promote the area internationally so it becomes better known and better protected.
We are also looking for individual scientists or students who would be willing to help us identify some of the species just by analyzing the photos we could send them (or the one we post on flickr), or even better by paying us a visit in our area.
So far we have international experts for the following arthropods groups: phasmatodea, odonata, opiliones, scorpiones and amblipigy, rhopalocera, myriapoda, and I think that’s it. Any other groups needs help…
The importance for me in being in touch with specialists vs generalists is that I found out they are the only one who can ID photos without problem unless a new species occurs. This avoids collecting and therefore the bureaucracy maze involved in obtaining permits, plus it gives those animals a break at a crucial time in the history of our planet when I think every single creature deserves a break before mass extinction takes places.
Nevertheless our fondation has the necessary contacts to obtain permits and we can seriously facilitate permits obenition if needed.
I am looking forward to hearing from you. Let’s keep in touch and don’t hesitate to come and visit us at some poit if you can.
Best regards,
Thierry Garcia
Fundación Ecológica Sumac Muyu
00 (593) 087-105-383
http://reservadelriobigal.googlepages.com

Hello again Thierry,
Thanks for you wonderful explanation of your project.  We are horrified to think that you interpreted our comment to mean that we thought entomology students were lazy.  We actually meant students taking general biology classes which are often required in high school and college.  Those classes often require students to make an insect collection and identify the specimens.  We also hope you are successful in your conservation attempts.  Here in Los Angeles, we are often battling with our own conservation attempts.  Our offices are located in the neighborhood of Mount Washington where some of the last remaining open spaces with endangered California Black Walnut Trees, Juglans californica, are located.  Activists and environmentalists are constantly at odds with developers who want to cut the trees and build McMansions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination