Currently viewing the category: "Gossamer Wings"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth? Butterfly? What is this blue lovely?
Geographic location of the bug:  Benbrook, TX, USA (DFW area)
Date: 11/26/2017
Time: 06:23 PM EDT
This beautiful butterfly/moth was on our front porch when we got home today. Posted it to facebook and no answers yet. I thought it was a moth because I’ve never seen a butterfly with it’s wings folded like that. My mom thinks it’s a butterfly because the antennae are not fuzzy. What is it? It’s still outside several hours later. Pretty little critter! Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Shara

Great Purple Hairstreak

Dear Shara,
We are very excited to post your lovely image of a Great Purple Hairstreak, a Gossamer Winged Butterfly.  Though we have several images in our archives of this species, we have either images showing the closed wings, or we have images of recently emerged individuals with wings not yet fully expanded.  We suspect your individual has also recently emerged from a pupa, and it was perhaps not quite ready to fly when your encounter occurred.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Interesting Lycaenid Butterfly in ShenZhen
Geographic location of the bug:  Shenzhen, China
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bugman,
I came across this butterfly in the specified location. Upon closer inspection, it looks like some of its patterns has faded (see IMG_4434). For example, there seems to be 4 faded spots around the discal area of the hindwing, and I could see extremely faint tints of orange around the black eyespot. I would appreciate your help!
How you want your letter signed:  Jonathan

Gossamer Winged Butterfly

Dear Jonathan,
We have trouble distinguishing different species of Gossamer Winged Butterflies from one another in North America where there are actually very excellent sites devoted to insect identification.  There is not the same database for Chinese species.  We believe this is most likely a Tailed Blue, but we would not rule out that it might be a Hairstreak.  Several similar looking species that we have found on the internet include a Pea Blue,
Lampides boeticus, that we found on My Butterfly Collection, and a Silver Forget-Me-Not, Catochrysops panormus, that we found on Butterflies of Singapore.

Gossamer Winged Butterfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  lane county oregon
Date: 09/20/2017
Time: 07:44 PM EDT
Rocky cliff face by a large reservoir in full sun April 28
How you want your letter signed:  Dave Stone

Probably Silvery Blue

Dear Dave,
This looks to us like a Silvery Blue,
Glaucopsyche lygdamus, a species that is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly ID
Location: Northern Spain
July 30, 2017 5:10 am
Hi Daniel I photographed this butterfly in Northern Spain in June this year but cant identify it can you help.
Signature: Tony Mellor UK

Gossamer Wing Butterfly

Hi Tony,
The best we can provide at this time is a family identification.  This is a Gossamer Winged Butterfly in the family Lycaenidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: West Los Angeles sighting – Marine Blue 1
Location: West Los Angeles
July 11, 2017 10:13 am
HI Bugman,
We planted Cape Plumbago to attract these little butterflies. Marine Blues have been the most difficult butterflies to photograph and I have not been able to get pics of anything but adults. They almost never rest and flit around my yard about 2 feet off the ground. If two meet, they spiral together about 15 feet up in the air.
These first photos were taken in 2011.
Signature: Jeff Bremer

Marine Blue

Hi Jeff,
Thanks for resending these images.  We agree that they represent the Marine Blue.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar hosts: Leadwort (
Plumbago) and many legumes including alfalfa (Medicago sativa), milkvetch (Astragalus), and mesquite (Prosopis).”  Having the plumbago in your yard is providing food for both adults and caterpillars. 

Marine Blue

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Subject: Butterfly
Location: Lesbos
June 28, 2017 1:15 pm
Daniel,
You were kind enough to identify some insects on Lesbos for me some time ago. I have now been back to Lesbos and have s few more for you. I hope to use these in a talk I have been asked to do for an RSPB group and would appreciate your help as I have been unable to identify them on line,
Regards
Signature: William Smiton

Small Copper

Dear William,
We began to research this Copper Butterfly with the Checklist of the Butterflies of Lesvos that is included on the Lesvos Birding site.  Two coppers are listed and the Small Copper link led us to this image on FlickR of
Lycaena phlaeas.  We learned on Learn About Butterflies that:  “The Small Copper is a very widespread species, occurring in Canada, the eastern United States, the Canary Isles, almost all of Europe including sub-arctic areas of Scandinavia, and across temperate Asia as far east as Japan. It also occurs across much of Africa, from the Atlas mountains and north African grasslands, south to Kenya and Malawi.”  According to BugGuide, the common name is American Copper, but that just won’t do for Lesbos.  BugGuide does note:  “The name American Copper is misleading, as there is nothing particularly American about this species. It is found across Eurasia and in mountains of northern and eastern Africa, and it bears many vernacular names depending upon the region found. It is the most widespread species of the genus Lycaena, and among the most widespread of all butterfly species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination