Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Newly Emerged Male Monarch
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 08/25/2018
Time: 11:30 AM EDT
Daniel was relaxing in the front yard when this Monarch flew past, seemingly struggling with flying, and it landed on the ground where Jennifer began to take some photos and video with her cellular telephone.  Daniel got the camera and by that time, Jennifer also noticed that something was not right, and the Monarch had flown to a laurel sumac.  Daniel had already suspected that perhaps what was wrong was that this was a newly eclosed Monarch that had not yet gotten used to flying.  The pristine quality of the wings and the fact that it rested on the sumac for about a half an hour, opening and closing its wings before flying off, both support that suspicion.  According to BugGuide:  “Males have scent-scale patches on hindwings, prominent when wings are open, and just possible to see when wings are folded” and this individual flashed his scent-scale patches for the camera.

Male Monarch

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and yellow spiny caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Clinton, IL
Date: 08/26/2018
Time: 01:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My son and I found this hiking in a heavy wooded area. We have no idea what species it is. We did find Colobura dirce but that’s inky found in Central America. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Ray and RJ Alvarado

Eastern Comma Caterpillar

Dear Ray and RJ,
We believe this is a Moth Caterpillar in the subfamily Hemileucinae, possibly a Buck Moth Caterpillar,
Hemileuca maia, which is pictured on BugGuide.  The coloration on your individual is different from any other images we have located.  We have requested assistance from Bill Oehlke on this identification.

Eastern Comma Caterpillar

Bill Oehlke makes correction:
Hi Daniel,
I think it is more likely a butterfly larva from Nymphalidae family.
Bill

Thanks so much Daniel. My son is super excited about finding a color that’s not normal.
Ray

Hold tight Ray.  We are going to have a correction for you.

Correction:  Eastern Comma Caterpillar
Hi again Ray,
After hearing from Bill Oehlke that this was more likely a Nymphalidae butterfly caterpillar, we located an image on BugGuide of an Eastern Comma Caterpillar,
Polygonia comma, and then located a second BugGuide image as substantiation.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed primarily on Hops (Humulus) and Nettles (Urtica, but also False Nettle (Boehmeria), Wood Nettle (Laportea), Elm (Ulmus), and probably other members of families Urticaceae and Ulmaceae.”  Despite having over 26,000 unique posting, this is the first image we have of an Eastern Comma Caterpillar on our site, though we have several images of adult Eastern Commas.

Perfect. Thanks for the follow up and you guys are welcome to use our pics if you’d like.
Ray Alvarado

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hungarian Butterflies
Geographic location of the bug:  Hungary May 2018
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 03:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there!
I have sent a few of my butterfly pictures to you in the past and I thought you might like a couple more for your site from a trip I made to Hungary earlier this year. The first is a Common Glider, the second is a Scarce Swallowtail
How you want your letter signed:  Butterfly watcher

Common Glider

Dear Butterfly watcher,
We split your submission into two distinct postings so that we could categorize your two butterflies, which are from different families, appropriately.  The Common Glider,
Neptis sappho, is, according to EuroButterflies:  “A delicate butterfly, gently glides through dappled light in woodland and along woodland edges” and its habitat is “Open woodland, clearings and woodland edges in dappled shade. Feeds on flowers, Euphorbias for example, and takes salts from mud” in “NE Italy and eastwards. Sporadic in the Balkans to north Greece. Double brooded in May/ June and July/ August.”  The common name is Pallas’ Sailer according to iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and blue butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Lower Michigan
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 10:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is a very friendly butterfly. We are camping mid August northern lower Michigan, in a small clearing in the middle of 100 acres of mixed forest. Poplar, birch, maple, pine and cedar among other underbrush species.
How you want your letter signed:  Prettpuddles

Red Spotted Purple

Dear Prettpuddles,
This gorgeous butterfly is a Red Spotted Purple.  Thanks for providing a list of plants in the area.  Poplar and birch are both caterpillar food plants for the Red Spotted Purple, a list that includes “A variety of deciduous trees: willows and poplars (Willow family), cherries, apples and pears (Rose family), birches (Birch family), oaks and beeches (Beech family), Basswood (Linden family) and others. Also recorded from currant and blueberry bushes” according to BugGuide.

Red Spotted Purple

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is it a leaf or a rectangle with legs?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwestern PA
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 11:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this on one of our Oak trees a couple of years ago and was never able to identify it.  Having come across your site, I hope you can achieve  what I haven’t.
How you want your letter signed:  Valerie

Questionmark

Hi Valerie,
Alas, your sharpest image is cropped so tightly that it has cut off the “stem” of the leaf which adds to the camouflage effect of this Questionmark butterfly, so we have also posted a blurrier image that includes the “stem.”  The Questionmark gets its name because of the silvery marking on the hind wings that resembles a grammatical interrogation symbol.  We suspect your individual is a male, because according to Butterflies and Moths of North America:  “Males find females by perching on leaves or tree trunks in the afternoon, flying to chase other insects and even birds.”

Questionmark

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red spotted purple butterflies
Geographic location of the bug:  Shohola Lake, PA
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 03:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These butterflies were alighting on one spot of gravel road by Shohola Lake.  It looks to be coyote scat (hair & bone fragments, pawprints seen in mud nearby).
They allowed me to approach slowly and I was lucky to get these shots.  They are truly gorgeous.
How you want your letter signed:  Paula K

Red Spotted Purple

Dear Paula,
Thanks so much for sending in your wonderful images of Red Spotted Purples “puddling” on coyote scat.  We have decided to make your submission our Bug of the Month for August 2018.  Though butterflies are generally thought of as pollinators that visit flowers, they will often visit more unsavory substances, including puddles of urine, scat, putrefying flesh, rotting fruit and mud puddles to ingest salts and minerals found there.

Red Spotted Purples

Dear Daniel,
I’m honored to have my photos chosen as Bug of the Month!  And now I know about “puddling.”
Some years back I send you photos of mating buck moths from Shohola Lake, PA.  It seems a great place to find interesting insects. And as I wrote back then, your site is a natural treasure!

Thanks for your kind words Paula.  We located your image of mating Buck Moths in our archives.  It is hard to believe that was 11 years ago and we are still going strong.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination