Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dark Winged Beauty
Geographic location of the bug:  Ventura, California
Date: 05/25/2020
Time: 07:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I have noticed this beauty on my patio the past few days. It stays close and sometimes pauses  briefly to bask in the sunlight. I was hoping to catch a picture of the open wing span, but instead it kept it’s wings together, eventually took flight   pausing mid air about 6 inches from my face and then departed.
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie in the Irish Chain

Mourning Cloak

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
Thank you so much for your entertaining telephone call describing this beauty, and you actually identified it as a Mourning Cloak during the call.  You are absolutely correct.  The Mourning Cloak often basks in the sun, and it is rarely seen nectaring from flowers.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed primarily on tree sap (oaks preferred) and rotting fruit; only occasionally on flower nectar.”  Your posting lured Daniel back to the site he has ignored for nearly five weeks, and he has never in the eighteen years the site has existed, been away that long, even in the early days of exhausted band width when after about ten days, Daniel could post no more until the first of the next month.  Thanks again for our enjoyable morning conversations and for making Daniel realize he really does need to make at least one posting per day.  Though the month is nearly over, Daniel never selected a Bug of the Month for May 2020, so since it is the first identification request we have filled since April 21, it is now the Bug of the Month for May 2020.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Florida
Date: 01/10/2020
Time: 03:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have identified & photographed well over 100 species of butterflies/moths over many years, but I am at a loss for the name of this beauty, and no amount of research has been successful.  Many thanks for your help!
Respectfully, Kathy Genaw
How you want your letter signed:  Kathy Genaw

Melanistic White Peacock

Dear Kathy,
We too are having a difficult time identifying you Brush Footed Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae.  It looks most to us like the White Peacock,
Anartia jatrophae, which can be viewed on BugGuide and on Carolina Nature, and we suspect it is closely related.  It is found in Florida, but though the dorsal side is similar, the ventral side is quite different.  We suspect it might be closely related, and is most likely a tropical species that has found its way to Florida.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a more conclusive identification.

Melanistic White Peacock

Update:  January 24, 2020
We have received two comments that this is an unusually colored White Peacock.  The darker coloration is known as melanism and both melanic and melanistic are appropriate adjectives to describe this individual.

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for your follow-up comments regarding my mystery butterfly.  I agree that it resembles the common White Peacock in some ways.  As a matter of fact, my photos indicate that I had photographed one of them nearby.  Perhaps the exact ID of this lovely butterfly in question is actually less important than having had the opportunity to observe and record such a  beautiful flyer!  May such opportunities continue for all of us for a very long time!
My best,
Kathy

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Common Buckeye?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Florida
Date: 08/26/2019
Time: 07:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!
I was stalking butterflies around my sister’s garden with my camera when visiting her recently in Florida…I snapped a photo of this pretty lady/fellow but discovered I missed getting it with wings open.  Is this a common buckeye?  Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Leslie F.

American Lady

Hi Leslie,
This is not a Buckeye.  The two spots on the hind wings are distinguishing features of the American Lady.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly near garden
Geographic location of the bug:  Hershey pa
Date: 08/24/2019
Time: 09:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this pretty butterfly near my garden. Just wondering what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Sue Katerman

Hackberry Emperor

Hi Sue,
This is a Hackberry Emperor, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Deciduous woodlands with hostplant, Hackberry (
Celtis).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth? in Michigam
Geographic location of the bug:  Ypsilanti, MI 48198
Date: 08/19/2019
Time: 05:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, looking for help with identification.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank You!!! JO

Questionmark

Dear JO,
This is not a Moth.  It is a newly eclosed butterfly, and that is its chrysalis in the background.  The common name for this butterfly is the Questionmark, a name that refers to the silver ?-shaped mark on the lower wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly or moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Tucson, AZ
Date: 08/09/2019
Time: 03:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I saw this butterfly or moth in an orange tree in my friends backyard in Tucson yesterday 8/8/19 around 5pm.
Sent it out to family, but no one knows what it is so far.
My friend fears it could hurt the tree.
If you are able to identify it I’d appreciate knowing what it is and if it takes up residence, could it cause harm and if so, how to encourage gently, to find another home.
Thank you for your service.
All the best,
How you want your letter signed:  Patrick

Hackberry Emperor

Dear Patrick,
Though your images lack critical sharpness, we are relative certain this butterfly is a Hackberry Emperor,
Asterocampa celtis, based on this BugGuide image.  We are intrigued with your friend’s irrational fear that a butterfly might pose a threat to the orange tree.  Butterflies generally feed on nectar.  Only in the caterpillar stage when most species feed on leaves would a butterfly pose anything resembling a threat to a tree, and then only if the caterpillars are very plentiful.  Is there a hackberry tree nearby?  Because the caterpillars feed on the leaves of hackberry, BugGuide notes of the habitat preference:  “Varied, but always near Hackberry trees.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination