Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this caterpillar?
Geographic location of the bug:  Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Date: 06/10/2018
Time: 08:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this caterpillar climbing on my front door yesterday. (picture 1)  Today I caught him j’ing (picture 2) He has now turned into a chrysalis.   (picture 3)  There is a second one of the same sort at the bottom of my door.  He is green with a dark head and has barbed setae or spikes.   I would like to know what kind of caterpillar he is and what he will become.  I hope you can help me.  Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Sherrie

Compton Tortoiseshell Caterpillar

Dear Sherrie,
How lucky are you???? We have identified your caterpillar as a Compton Tortoiseshell Caterpillar,
Nymphalis l-album, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  The caterpillar and chrysalis are described on BugGuide,:  “Larva: body speckled and spotted white on pale green, yellow and brown, or blackish, with several rows of branched, usually black spines; head also bears many short spines, with one pair larger and branched near the tip. This is the only Nymphalis species with the pair of branched head horns. Polygonia larvae are similar, though usually with different markings.  Pupae: similar to other Nymphalis and to Aglais species, with two points on head end and two rows of conical projections mostly arranged along the dorsum of abdomen + thorax; plus, one prominent point on the mid-dorsum and more along the sides of the thorax.”  According to BugGuide, the range is:  “southeastern Alaska and across Canada south of the tundra, south in the west to Montana and Wyoming, south in the east to North Carolina and Missouri known to wander; has been recorded as far south as California and Florida, and as far north as Baker Lake, north of treeline in Nunavut.”   The chrysalis of the Compton Tortoiseshell is pictured on the John Fowler website.  If your luck continues and you are able to witness the emergence of the adult Compton Tortoiseshell, we would love to have you send us the images.

Pre-Pupal Compton Tortoiseshell Caterpillar

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much!  I was curious to see what kind of caterpillar it was.  The caterpillar crawled up my front door and decided that was the place to stay.  Ot was interesting to see him in the j.  An hour and a half later he was a chrysalis.  Only assuming it was that long because that is when I came back from shopping.  I now have another one below my front door, so I have the opportunity to witness two emerge.  I hope they do it while I am watching.  Do you know how long they will stay in the chrysalis before they emerge?
Thank you again,
Sherrie

Hi again Sherrie,
The actual eclosion date, the day the adult emerges from the chrysalis, may vary depending upon temperature and other weather conditions, but according to BBC:  “The chrysalis stage varies between species but is usually around two weeks, whilst the caterpillar inside is undergoes metamorphosis into a butterfly. In order to emerge, they need to be out of direct sunlight, at around 25 degrees and in relatively high humidity.”  According to Woodland Trust:  “Conversion to a butterfly takes place inside the chrysalis – this process can take several weeks.”  According to Sciencing:  “Most butterflies take about 10 to 14 days to emerge from their chrysalises.”  Many chrysalides change color just prior to pupation, so that might be a hint that eclosion is near.

Chrysalis of a Compton Tortoiseshell

Update:  June 23, 2018
Hi Daniel,
I ended up having 5 Compton Tortoiseshell caterpillars turn into chrysalis around the front of the house.  You were right their chrysalis do change color prior to eclosion.  I went to get groceries in the morning and noticed that their cocoons had changes color.  I came back and I noticed that one had emerged.  I was gone only 30 minutes.  Sad that I did not get to see the eclosion, just missed it, but happy to see the butterfly resting and finishing his wing development.  Beautiful.  I have included a close up of my newly emerged Compton Tortoiseshell butterfly.  I believe 4 out of the 5 survived and think something happened to the one that cocooned on my front door.  Again thank you for your help identifying my caterpillars.

Eclosion of a Compton Tortoiseshell

Thanks for the update Sherrie.  We really appreciate the images of the adult to add to your previous posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern CA
Date: 05/18/2018
Time: 02:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman: 
This one decided to crawl up our wall in the backyard and change to this. What type or moth or butterfly is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Karen

Mourning Cloak

Dear Karen,
This is a newly emerged Mourning Cloak Butterfly.  The caterpillars can be quite numerous on elm and willow trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Taiwan
Date: 05/11/2018
Time: 04:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I was wondering if you could help me identify this butterfly.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks! Libbi

Ceylon Blue Glassy Tiger

Dear Libbi,
When we checked our emailed identification requests, we found 16 requests from you.  We are impressed with your enthusiasm, but that is nearly a week’s worth of postings for us so we will slowly answer as many of your requests as possible, but we also have additional requests from other readers.  Your butterfly is in the Milkweed Butterfly subfamily Danainae as indicated in this Butterflies of Taiwan page and Taiwan News has an unidentified image of numerous individuals.  It might be a Blue Tiger,
Tirumala limniace limniace, which is pictured on My Butterfly Collection.  According to Encyclopedia of Life, the range is “South Asia and Southeast Asia. Also found in numbers in Queensland (at least as far south as Mackay, but also recorded in Brisbane) Australia.”  An even closer visual match is the Ceylon Blue Glassy Tiger, Ideopsis similis, which is pictured on FlickR and is also found in Taiwan according to this FlickR posting.  According to the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department Hong Kong site, it is found in Taiwan and is called the Blue Glassy Tiger.  According to Encyclopedia of Life:  “The Ceylon Blue Glassy Tiger (Ideopsis similis) is a butterfly found in Asia, including India and Taiwan.”  Our money is on the latter of these similar, related species.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help Save the Butterfly
Location:  UK
Date:  January 31, 2018
Hey there!
I thought I’d pop over an email after reading an article on your site about butterflies: https://www.whatsthatbug.com/category/caterpillars-and-pupa/moth-caterpillars/bagworm/
After building a wonderful butterfly garden with my son last summer, I recently blogged a massive 3000 word guide on how we can stop their numbers declining.
Hopefully it generates a bit of awareness, and teaches people how to help if they fly into your garden!
Feel free to check it out here: https://diygarden.co.uk/wildlife/ultimate-guide-to-butterflies/
If you think it’s useful, please do link to it from you post. 76% of our butterfly species have declined over the past 40 years, so anything that helps spread the word about protecting these little chaps would be massively appreciated.
In return, I’ll happily share your article with my 7,000+ followers on social media!
Thanks so much for your help, and have a great day 🙂
Clive

Fritillaries

Dear Dave,
Thanks for your public awareness campaign and your active attempts in your own yard to create a butterfly garden, both of which earn you the honor of having this posting tagged with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Are you able to tell us which Fritillary species is represented in your image?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly seen today
Geographic location of the bug:  San Francisco Bay Area nature preserve
Date: 02/01/2018
Time: 08:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this beauty today on an unusually warm February day.  ID help would be much appreciated. Thanks!!
How you want your letter signed:  David A

Mourning Cloak

Dear David,
Because they hibernate, Mourning Cloaks are often the first butterflies seen flying in the spring.  It is not uncommon to see a Mourning Cloak flying with snow still on the ground if it is a warm sunny day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Probably Opsiphanes invirae
Geographic location of the bug:  Amazon rainforest in Peru
Date: 11/27/2017
Time: 02:01 PM EDT
Hi again,
This time I come with a probably identified species and just need to confirm it. Or not. 😉
I think it’s Opsiphanes invirae, and you?
It was in august 2009.
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Ferran Lizana

Brush-Footed Butterfly

Hi Ferran,
Most images of
Opsiphanes invirae that are posted online of living specimens show the ventral wing surfaces, like the images on Learn About Butterflies, and the markings on the ventral surface of your individual are barely visible, but they also appear much less ornate.  You may be correct, but we cannot state that for certain.  This image from FlickR appears very close.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination