Currently viewing the category: "Brush Footed Butterflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and blue butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Lower Michigan
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 10:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is a very friendly butterfly. We are camping mid August northern lower Michigan, in a small clearing in the middle of 100 acres of mixed forest. Poplar, birch, maple, pine and cedar among other underbrush species.
How you want your letter signed:  Prettpuddles

Red Spotted Purple

Dear Prettpuddles,
This gorgeous butterfly is a Red Spotted Purple.  Thanks for providing a list of plants in the area.  Poplar and birch are both caterpillar food plants for the Red Spotted Purple, a list that includes “A variety of deciduous trees: willows and poplars (Willow family), cherries, apples and pears (Rose family), birches (Birch family), oaks and beeches (Beech family), Basswood (Linden family) and others. Also recorded from currant and blueberry bushes” according to BugGuide.

Red Spotted Purple

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is it a leaf or a rectangle with legs?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwestern PA
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 11:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this on one of our Oak trees a couple of years ago and was never able to identify it.  Having come across your site, I hope you can achieve  what I haven’t.
How you want your letter signed:  Valerie

Questionmark

Hi Valerie,
Alas, your sharpest image is cropped so tightly that it has cut off the “stem” of the leaf which adds to the camouflage effect of this Questionmark butterfly, so we have also posted a blurrier image that includes the “stem.”  The Questionmark gets its name because of the silvery marking on the hind wings that resembles a grammatical interrogation symbol.  We suspect your individual is a male, because according to Butterflies and Moths of North America:  “Males find females by perching on leaves or tree trunks in the afternoon, flying to chase other insects and even birds.”

Questionmark

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red spotted purple butterflies
Geographic location of the bug:  Shohola Lake, PA
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 03:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These butterflies were alighting on one spot of gravel road by Shohola Lake.  It looks to be coyote scat (hair & bone fragments, pawprints seen in mud nearby).
They allowed me to approach slowly and I was lucky to get these shots.  They are truly gorgeous.
How you want your letter signed:  Paula K

Red Spotted Purple

Dear Paula,
Thanks so much for sending in your wonderful images of Red Spotted Purples “puddling” on coyote scat.  We have decided to make your submission our Bug of the Month for August 2018.  Though butterflies are generally thought of as pollinators that visit flowers, they will often visit more unsavory substances, including puddles of urine, scat, putrefying flesh, rotting fruit and mud puddles to ingest salts and minerals found there.

Red Spotted Purples

Dear Daniel,
I’m honored to have my photos chosen as Bug of the Month!  And now I know about “puddling.”
Some years back I send you photos of mating buck moths from Shohola Lake, PA.  It seems a great place to find interesting insects. And as I wrote back then, your site is a natural treasure!

Thanks for your kind words Paula.  We located your image of mating Buck Moths in our archives.  It is hard to believe that was 11 years ago and we are still going strong.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly vs Wasp vs ???
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Florida
Date: 07/26/2018
Time: 11:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this butterfly on a shrub near home and cannot figure out the name.  Have only seen once but am curious has different colors (off white, brown and gold) than what I usually see.
How you want your letter signed:  Elaine

White Peacock

Dear Elaine,
This pretty butterfly, which we identified on BugGuide, is a White Peacock,
Anartia jatrophae, and according to BugGuide:  “Resident from Argentina north through Central America, Mexico, and the West Indies to South Texas and southern Florida. Migrates and temporarily colonizes to central Texas and coastal South Carolina. A rare wanderer to North Carolina, Missouri, Nebraska, and Kansas.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gorgeous Red Spotted Purple Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  High Springs, Fl.
Date: 07/22/2018
Time: 10:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi big team.  When I lived in Orlando I was a little too far south to see these beauties and I told my husband that it was my dream to one day see a red spotted purple.  Since we moved to north central Florida I now see them occasionally and they are quite photogenic.  We bought a wild cherry tree and even raised a couple of caterpillars into adulthood.  Here’s a photo of my latest sighting.  Thank you for your time and efforts so that nature lovers like myself can enjoy this site.
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth (a.k.a . Butterfly Girl)

Red Spotted Purple

Dear Elizabeth,
The Red Spotted Purple is most definitely one of the most beautiful North American butterflies.  Providing habitat and larval foods is a very good strategy for attracting butterflies, and we are happy to hear your wild cherry tree is luring Red Spotted Purples for you.  Because of your habitat creating efforts, we are tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

I am honored.  I really enjoy every effort to help nature thrive. Thank you.
Elizabeth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa rica
Date: 07/14/2018
Time: 07:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can’t believe I’ve lived here for years and this is the first time seeing this butterfly.
How you want your letter signed:  Jori

Glossy Daggerwing

Dear Jori,
We can’t believe you saw such a beautiful butterfly, yet the image you attached is very low resolution.  We quickly identified Iole’s Daggerwing,
Marpesia iole, thanks to Getty Images., and upon searching for a second reference, we found a Costa Rican FlickR posting identified as the Glossy Daggerwing, Marpesia furcula iole.  The common name Sunset Daggerwing is used on iNaturalist and the range map includes many Costa Rican sightings.  Butterflies of America uses the common name Glossy Daggerwing to identify Marpesia furcula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination