Currently viewing the category: "Butterflies and Skippers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern India
Date: 11/11/2017
Time: 08:36 AM EDT
Hi:) I saw this in our garden by the beach ( south india) . we have never seen this in all the years we have been visiting the beach! Am hoping you can help us spot which one this is..thank u Mr.Bugman:)
How you want your letter signed:  Atreyu Samuel

Great Eggfly

Dear Atreyu,
We wish you had sent a higher resolution image.  We feel confident that this is a male Giant Eggfly,
Hypolimnas bolina, based on images posted to Butterflies of India.  According to Learn About Butterflies:  “The popular name ‘Eggfly’ refers to the extraordinary parental behaviour of several members of the genus including antilope, anomala and bolina, which have a unique way of safeguarding their offspring. Prior to laying any eggs they they inspect various leaves to ensure that there are no ants present. The eggs of antilope and anomala are laid in large batches on the upper surface of a leaf, while those of bolina are usually laid in very small batches on the under surface. After ovipositing the females then stand guard over their eggs, forming a protective umbrella to shield them from parasitoid wasps. They remain in this position until all the eggs have hatched and the caterpillars have dispersed, by which time the protective female has usually died in situ.”

Thank you Daniel so much for taking the time to reply to me. I really do appreciate it. I looked up the links you sent too. I shared it with my grandfather too, who is a bug enthusiast too.
I know ,I wish I could have taken more pictures…but it flew away:(
Thanks again and have a great week ahead!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Athens Texas
Date: 09/22/2017
Time: 09:25 PM EDT
I am interested to know the identification of a butterfly.
How you want your letter signed:  Janice

Spicebush Swallowtail

Dear Janice,
The green spots on the lower wings indicate this is a male Spicebush Swallowtail like the one in this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  lane county oregon
Date: 09/20/2017
Time: 07:44 PM EDT
Rocky cliff face by a large reservoir in full sun April 28
How you want your letter signed:  Dave Stone

Probably Silvery Blue

Dear Dave,
This looks to us like a Silvery Blue,
Glaucopsyche lygdamus, a species that is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Ellensburg, Washington
Date: 09/13/2017
Time: 11:34 AM EDT
Hi,
Found this at work and wondered what kind of butterfly or moth this might be.
How you want your letter signed:  Anna

Fritillary

Hi Anna,
This is a Fritillary Butterfly, but we are not certain which species.  The Washington Butterflies page pictures several similar looking species.

Hi!
Thank you! I think I figured it out from the page you mentioned! I have attached the corresponding screen shots! (Ed. Note:  screen shot is Coronis Fritillary) You guys are the best!!!

Thank you so much!
Anna L Kelly
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nymphalid Butterfly Mystery
Geographic location of the bug:  Beijing, China
August 29, 2017
Greetings Mr Bugman,
I came across this butterfly in a park in Beijing. I am having trouble identifying it, but to me it looks like a member of the Nymphalidae family. I thought it belonged to the genus Vanessa, but now I’m having some doubts. I will be grateful if you can help me identify this butterfly! Thank you very much!
How you want your letter signed:  Jonathan

Emperor Butterfly

Dear Jonathan,
We did not have any luck identifying your Brush Footed Butterfly, but we do agree it is in the family Nymphalidae.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck and write in to us with an identification.

Karl Identifies Emperor Butterfly
Nymphalid Butterfly Mystery, Beijing, China – August 29, 2017
Hello Daniel and Jonathan:
This is an Emperor butterfly in the genus Apatura. A number of species are native to China, all somewhat similar and diverse. The closest I can find is Apatyra ilia, which ranges all through Europe, Russia and northern Asia to Japan. There are a lot of images online, but you could check out this site (click on the thumbnails at the bottom of the page). There are a few species that I could not find illustrations for so there could be something closer. Regards. Karl

Thanks so much Karl.  We did try unsuccessfully to search the same genus as the Hackberry Emperor, the North American butterfly that most closely resembled this individual in our opinion.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Milbert’s Tortoiseshell
Geographic location of the bug:  Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
Date: 09/04/2017
Time: 03:13 AM EDT
From my research I gather this is a common butterfly, but I though you might be interested in a photo of the undersides of its wings. Almost looks prehistoric.
How you want your letter signed:  Jeanne

MIlbert’s Tortoiseshell

Dear Jeanne,
Your images are quite beautiful.  The Milbert’s Tortoiseshell is not considered a rare species, but we have not received an image since 2011.  Furthermore, we love getting submissions from Alaska.  The Milbert’s Tortoiseshell is considered one of the Anglewing Butterflies, a group that has brown, mottled markings on the underwings that help to camouflage the brightly colored butterfly when it alights and folds its wings near dried leaves and on tree trunks.

Milbert’s Tortoiseshell

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination