Currently viewing the category: "Butterflies and Skippers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly/Moth
Location: Indiana
January 17, 2017 7:36 pm
Found this butterfly/moth unable to fly. I tried to offer it some sugar water and fruit, but it didn’t live long after I found it.
Signature: Eliza

Deformed Tiger Swallowtail

Dear Eliza,
This is a Tiger Swallowtail, and for some reason its wings failed to expand after emerging from the Chrysalis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth?
Location: Poland
January 5, 2017 8:01 pm
Saw this in my kitchen this evening. It’s January in Maine. Found it to be a bit odd to be out this time of year. Any idea what it is? It thought Cabbage moth, but it has grey swirls, not a spot on the wing.
Signature: Jim

Cabbage White

Dear Jim,
This is not a moth, it is a butterfly.  Though the white spot on the forewing is not visible in your image, we are pretty confident this is a male Cabbage White, a species introduced to North America from Europe over 100 years ago.  See this BugGuide image for comparison. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly in Baja California, Mexico.
Location: Baja California, Mexico, southeast coast.
January 2, 2017 10:10 pm
I just submitted a butterfly about 20 minutes before this one. It was the wrong picture. This is the butterfly that my brother took a picture of in Baja California, Mexico, southeast coast, on January 1st. We researched it for a while but could not identify it. Wondering if it is immature.
Sorry for the wrong picture last time.
Signature: Dan in Nevada

Brushfooted Butterfly

Blackened Bluewing Butterfly

Dear Dan,
The best we can provide at this time is a family identification.  This is a Brushfooted Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae, and we could not find it listed on the Butterflies and Moths of North America site, which leads us to believe it is probably a mainland species that has strayed to the coast of Baja.  We suspect one of our readers will provide us with a species name and a link very soon.

Update:  January 4, 2017
We received a comment that this is a Blackened Bluewing,
Myscelia cyananthe, a species that appears to have much variation.  This individual on iNaturalist looks similar, but images on Butterflies of America and BugGuide look different.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow butterfly
Location: Ontario
November 26, 2016 9:16 am
Hi,
We found both of these (same butterfly) in the house, it’s white yellow with a few spots. Can you tell me what it is?
Thanks
Signature: Marie-Eve

Cabbage Whites

Cabbage Whites

Dear Marie-Eve,
These pretty little butterflies are Cabbage Whites, a European species thought to have been introduced into North America in the 19th Century.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced accidentally near Montreal in the 1860s, this species has become an important pest. Bacterial and viral diseases now provide some biological control.”  Caterpillars feed on cabbage and many other plants in the same family.

Cabbage Whites

Cabbage White

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: From Bangladesh with Bugs
Location: Dhaka, Bangladesh
November 18, 2016 9:04 am
Hello there.
We are two ecologists from Bangladesh who have started a small initiative (voluntarily)- that is to identify different species which live in our capital city Dhaka (urban biodiversity) using facebook group. We call it “Life in the midst of a concrete jungle”. The idea is that members will submit some photos and we will try to id them or find people who may help us. Sometimes, especially with arthropods its very difficult. Thus we are asking for your help. The quality of some of the photos may be quite bad for which it may be quite difficult. So even genus level would be quite good. Thank you in advance.
Regards,
Signature: Regards, Sate Ahmad & Mofiz Rahman

Common Evening Brown

Common Evening Brown

Dear Sate & Mofiz,
Your project sounds marvelous.  Both of your butterflies are in the family Nymphalidae, the Brush-Footed Butterflies, and they are characterized by having their first pair of legs atrophied and useless for walking, so they appear to have only four legs.  We started our search on the Butterflies of Bangladesh website, and we clicked through all the members of the family Nymphalidae before coming to the conclusion that at least one of your butterflies is a Common Evening Brown,
Melanitis leda.  According to the Butterflies of Bangladesh:  “Status: Very common. Habit and Habitat: Found in all types of habitat from grass land, cultivated land, bushes, homestead gardens, plain land forest to hill forests. In the day time it is hide with in dry leaves, which is difficult to identify. Become active before evening. Often seen come home attracted by light. Fond of rotten fruit and tree exudates.”  As you can see from the images on the Butterflies of Bangladesh site, this is a highly variable species.  We tried to find other examples online that more closely resembled the two images you submitted.  SambuiButterflies has an image with color and markings nearly identical to the image you provided of the Common Evening Brown resting on a leaf, a the site states:  “Not uncommon species with an enormous variety of underside patterns.”  Project Noah has an image that resembles the markings on the individual resting on the stucco wall.  We believe your moth is in the family Lasiocampidae.

Common Evening Brown

Common Evening Brown

Dear Mr. Marlos,
Thank you so much for this! We really appreciate it.
Regards
Sate & Mofiz

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Urban Oasis for Butterflies
Location: Harker Heights, Texas
November 15, 2016 9:00 pm
Hello again!
Bad news: I had to have dental surgery. 🙁
Good news: My very-excellent-surgeon has built a new office building, complete with wildlife gardens that he and his wife planted. 🙂
Clouds of butterflies are enjoying their gardens. Eighty-three degrees today, with not a cloud in the skies.
I saw monarchs, queens (I think? some mating), American snouts, giant swallowtails, sulphurs, skippers, whites, emperors, maybe sleepy oranges, tiny blues… all so beautiful.
Hoping you’re both having a great week.
Signature: Ellen

Queens

Queens

Dear Ellen,
We are sorry to hear about your surgery, and we think it is amazing that you took your camera with you to the dentist.  We love your images of Queens, a Monarch and a Giant Swallowtail.

Monarch

Monarch

Thank you! I had to return to the dental surgeon’s office a second day, oh joy, and took my camera then. The surgeon and staff had invited me into the employees’ courtyard to take photos because I admired the gardens through the picture windows when I saw them on the first day. So very kind of them!

Butterflies

Butterflies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination