Currently viewing the category: "Weevils"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please identify this green bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Gun Flint Trail in Northern Minnesota
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 03:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was standing on a dock by a lake for just a few minutes and after I got back in the car I felt something crawling in my hair. I found this green bug. He crawled but I never saw him fly so I am not sure if he could or not. I took this picture of it before letting it go back outside.
How you want your letter signed:  Jayne Pietsch

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Dear Jayne,
As you can see from this BugGuide image, you encountered a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe (widespread there), adventive in NA, established in the northeast” and it feed on “primarily Yellow Birch.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Well-camouflaged beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Burns, TN 37029 (Montgomery Bell State Park)
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 12:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi–
I saw this bug on July 23rd of this year and was impressed by its effective camouflage on the decaying bridge rail. It looks somewhat like a Southwestern Ironclad Beetle, but Tennessee is well out of that beetle’s range. Any idea what else it could be?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in Tennessee

Avocado Weevil

Dear Curious in Tennessee,
We agree that your beetle resembles the Ironclad Beetle found from Texas westward, and we thought it resembled a Weevil, so we searched through Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans and we quickly located the Avocado Weevil,
Heilipus apiatus.  The book states:  “Adults are found year-round, but reach peak activity in summer, found on sassafras (Sassafras) and under pine (Pinus) bark.  Adults and larvae are serious pests of avocados (Persea); adults eat young fruits, while larvae bore and develop in base of trunk.  Virginia to Florida west to Tennessee.”  There are images on Forestry Images and on BugGuide.

Perfect! Many thanks for your quick reply. I’m going share your reply with my curious Facebook friends and encourage donations to WTB.
Best,
Maria
(aka Curious in Tennessee)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  weevils in the rainforest
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Celeste de Upala near Rincon de la Vieja, Guanacaste,CR
Date: 06/12/2018
Time: 10:16 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help me to identify these weevils, they were very interesting in texture and I can’t find them in INBIO,http://coleoptera-neotropical.org/paginas/2_PAISES/C-Rica/Curculionoidea/Curculionidae-CRica.html, or anything else
thank you in advance
How you want your letter signed:  Weevils from Rio Celeste de Upala

Mating Weevils

Like you, we have not had any luck determining a species identity for these mating Weevils.  We did locate an image at the very bottom of the Homestead Brooklyn blog page devoted to Tapanti National Park that is unidentified and another similar looking individual from Selva Verde, Costa Rica that is unidentified on Alamy.  The Costa Rica Research page of the Microbiology at Occidental College site also has a similar looking unidentified Weevil on it.  Finally, we located your image on Jungle Dragon.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

Mating Weevils

Thank you for your help!
It is always very tricky to identify CR insects.  There are no books and no good web sites, only those meant for biological warfare identify ‘plagas’ or pests..
With best wishes
Annette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and white bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern England
Date: 06/10/2018
Time: 03:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was seen in a garden center and it looks like it’s mating
How you want your letter signed:  Rick Powell

Mating Figwort Weevils

Dear Rick,
These are mating Figwort Weevils,
Cionus scrophulariae, which we identified on Bug Blog and the verified its identity on UK Beetle Recording.  According to Nature Spot:  “Fairly frequent and widespread in Britain with fewer records from the north” and the habitat is “Around the foodplants Figwort and Mullein.”

Mating Figwort Weevils

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weevil ID assistance
Geographic location of the bug:  Mindanao, Philippines
Date: 05/02/2018
Time: 02:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Maam/Sir, good day!
I am Maria Tanola, a Biology student of University of Southeastern Philippines. As part of our curriculum, I was provided with an unidentified weevil species for me to work with. I have been working on this case study for months now, however, I came up with Otiorhynchus singularis (italicized) and Otiorhynchus sulcatus (italicized) as an initial identification. I believe that this unidentified species is just between the two. Hence, I am writing to humbly request your service and expertise to confirm or correct my initial identification for the abovementioned weevil species.
I am looking forward for your urgent response as this is a timely matter.
Sincerely,
Maria
How you want your letter signed:  Weevil

Weevil

Dear Maria,
Your photomicroscopy images of a Weevil are quite detailed, but alas, we do not have the necessary skills to answer your very detailed question.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist you by submitting comments.

Weevil

Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  is this a type of darkling beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Buffalo New York
Date: 01/29/2018
Time: 07:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I have been trying to identify this Beetle on your site and the closest I can come is that it is a darkling beetle. This one was alive, two others that I found in my apartment this week were already dead. Beatles are not poisonous are they? Thanks for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  V

Weevil

Dear V,
We believe this is a Weevil, and based on the image posted to the Northeastern Integrated Pest Management Program site, it resembles the Annual Bluegrass Weevil,
Listronotus maculicollis, and when we researched the species on BugGuide, we found that it is a relatively large genus represented on BugGuide and the tribe to which it belongs has two genera, and many members look similar, so we feel confident this is a Weevil, and it might be a member of the tribe Listroderini, but we are uncertain of the species.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for your quick identification! I now know how to research what to do about them. Have a great night.
Best,
Venessa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination