Currently viewing the category: "Weevils"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug in the trunk
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Ana, CA
Date: 08/23/2019
Time: 11:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was hanging out inside my trunk. I used a twig to detach it, but it was holding on with super strength.
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Michika

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Mike,
This is an invasive Diaprepes Root Weevil,
Diaprepes abbreviatus, and according to the Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program:  “The diaprepes root weevil damages both the leaves and the roots of plants. The adult weevils damage leaves by chewing semi-circular areas out of the leaf margin. There may also be frass or weevil droppings near the areas that have been fed upon. The grub-like larva feeds on the roots of a plant, weakening or killing a plant.”  According to the Center for Invasive Species Research:  “This pest has a very wide host range, attacking more than 270 species of plants in 59 plant families.  In Florida citrus groves, Diaprepes root damage allows, Phytophthora, a very serious and often lethal plant pathogen to invade roots further hastening the decline of trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Costa Rica Trip
Geographic location of the bug:  Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica
Date: 06/18/2019
Time: 08:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this dead in the pool on our trip to Costa Rica. I did put it poolside as sometimes a “drowned” insect can come back…but with all the birds and lizards, I’m sure the insect ended up a snack.
Bonus image is a cute little velvet ant from San Jose, Costa Rica
How you want your letter signed:  Traveling guy

Bottlebrush Weevil

Dear Traveling guy,
This is a Bottlebrush Weevil,
Rhinostomus barbirostris.  According to iNaturalist, it is also called a Bearded Weevil.

Bottlebrush Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug found at Joshua Tree Nat Park
Geographic location of the bug:  Joshua Tree National Park
Date: 03/19/2019
Time: 12:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I found this little guy/gal on March 17, 2019 at Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California. Do you know what it is? Thank you, Deb
How you want your letter signed:  deb

Weevil

Dear Deb,
This is some species of Weevil, but we do not recognize it.  Can you please provide an approximate size and any other helpful information.  Was it found on a plant?  What type of plant?  Often, knowing the food preferences is a big assistance with identifications.

Weevil

Hello Daniel,
Thank you for replying.
Ah-ha! I thought it might be some sort of a weevil! J
I am sorry, I thought I sent you the photo of it with my finger in the photo so you could see its size in relationship to my finger.
Attached is the photo of it with my thumb in the photo. It is about the size of my thumb nail.
It was not found on a plant.
I found it March 17, 2019, on the roadway, under my solar panels in La Quinta, CA behind the Torre Nissan dealership (address: 2069 79125, CA-111, La Quinta, CA 92253)
I don’t know if this is relevant or not to its origin:

  • Just prior to finding it, I was out camping at Joshua Tree National Park in California from March 7, 2019 – March 16, 2019.
  • I stayed at Belle campground in the park.
  • The park was in full bloom.
  • When leaving the park on March 16, 2019, I had vehicle problems and was towed to Torre Nissan dealership (address: 2069 79125, CA-111, La Quinta, CA 92253)
  • While waiting for my truck to be repaired, I parked my travel trailer behind the Nissan dealership.
  • I put out my solar panels on the roadway so I would have electricity while I waited.
  • The next day, on March 17, 2019, my truck repairs were done and I went to pack up my solar panels and this little guy was on the ground under my panels.
  • I can’t be sure that he stowed away in my solar panels or that I carried him from Joshua Tree National Park to La Quinta, CA.
  • All I can say is that it was on the roadway, under my solar panels, in La Quinta, CA behind the Torre Nissan dealership (address: 2069 79125, CA-111, La Quinta, CA 92253)

Thank you for your help.
I posted it on my Facebook page and everyone was interested in knowing what this strange creature was.
I did a little research on the internet and I thought it might be a weevil of some sort.
Deb

Unknown Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Puerto Vallarta Jalisco mx
Date: 03/04/2019
Time: 07:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just curious for ID of this long neck bug.
How you want your letter signed:  Robert

Weevil:  Brentus anchorago

Dear Robert,
This is a Weevil, and we are confident the species is
Brentus anchorago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Livingston, Guatemala
Date: 12/21/2018
Time: 03:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Flew around the boat about 50 metres offshore…landed…left.
How you want your letter signed:  By Feather Quill (cause it’s classy)

South American Palm Weevil

Dear Classy Reader who writes with a Quill Pen,
This is a Weevil, a type of Beetle in the family Curculionidae, according to BugGuide:  “Arguably, the largest animal family with more than 50,000 species in ~4600 genera worldwide.”  Your individual is quite large for a Weevil, and we thought it would be easy to identify, however, the best we could do in a short amount of time is to find a matching image of an unidentified individual on the Highlights Along the Way blog.

South American Palm Weevil

We did additional research that included lightening a cropped version of one of your images that now reveals the details on the elytra, and we now believe this is a South American Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus palmarum, a species that is also reported from Central America and is pictured on Insect Designs.  There is a UC Riverside pdf on this species that shows the horrific damage it can cause to palm trees.

Elytra of South American Palm Weevil

Thank you for your reply. In the meantime I found out what species it is. Someone from iNaturalist who is also from Serbia said that there is actually only one species in Serbia which is Pentodon idiota.
Regards,
Mihajlo

Hi again Mihajlo,
Thanks so much for providing this update.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black striped beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  North San Diego County, CA
Date: 11/05/2018
Time: 03:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was sitting on a stucco wall, then moved to the pavement. Any idea what he/she is?  He/she was about an inch long.
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah L

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Sarah,
Thanks for resending your images.  We are currently undergoing some technical difficulties.  This is a Diaprepes Root Weevil and according to BugGuide:  “Native to the Caribbean, adventive and established in so. US: so. & central FL (1964), so. TX (Cameron & Hidalgo Cos 2000, Corpus Christi 2005, Houston 2009;), so. CA (2005), LA (2008); further north in greenhouses.”  BugGuide also notes:  “highly polyphagous; larvae feed on roots, adults on foliage of citrus trees (esp. oranges in TX) and almost 300 other plant species” and “Major pest of citrus crops.”

Thanks so much, Daniel! I’d never seen anything looking like that before here in Southern California. (And I’m a native!) I guess I’ll kill any others I find since I do have citrus trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination