Currently viewing the category: "Water Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of beetle is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tri-state area: MI, IN, OH
Date: 03/27/2019
Time: 07:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this insect dying on my deck (though the dog may have put it there). I’ve never seen one like it, much less at the end of March when very little is moving here yet. I assume it’s a beetle of some kind, but Google isn’t much help.
Thanks for answering my curiosity if you have the time! 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Curious Gardener

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Dear Curious Gardener,
This is a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the family Dytiscidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  You may read about Predaceous Diving Beetles on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Wilmington, NC
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 01:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this in my ditch after a bunch of rainfall. We have had standing water for 2 weeks.  It has 6 legs near its head.
How you want your letter signed:  Wendy Pendill

Water Tiger

Dear Wendy,
This looks to us like a Water Tiger, the larva of a Giant Water Scavenger Beetle, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae often predatory.”   Here is a nice BugGuide posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange(r) thing(s)
Geographic location of the bug:  Burgundy france
Date: 06/08/2018
Time: 01:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug had large pincers at the front, legs on his front half and moved like someone dancing the worm. It was about an inch long and very aggressive. If provoked it would curl up back on itself.
How you want your letter signed:  C. McCarthy

Water Tiger

Dear C. McCarthy
Was it found near or in water?  It looks to us like an aquatic beetle larva, commonly called a Water Tiger.

Hi Daniel,
Yes, it was near a small pond. Thanks for the quick positive identification, it helped solve a little debate with the family 🙂
Chris

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug I.D. please
Geographic location of the bug:  Curtis, Washington
Date: 12/03/2017
Time: 10:41 PM EDT
This beetle/bug landed on our porch tonight just at dusk.  I took a couple of photos and it flew off, straight up for at least 50 feet.  It is about 1.5 inches long.  Does anyone know what type of beetle it is? I live in Western Washington State and this photo was taken today, Dec.3rd
How you want your letter signed:  Sparty

Boreal Diving Beetle

Dear Sparty,
After you went through the trouble to create a composite view of this Predaceous Diving Beetle, we cropped it back into two distinct images.  We believe your individual, because of your location and the grooved elytra or wing covers, that this is a Boreal Diving Beetle,
Dytiscus alaskanus.  According to BugGuide, its range is:  “Transcontinental in Canada and Alaska, also present in parts of n. US as far south as Colorado” and “Overwinter as adults in permanent waters.”

Boreal Diving Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Skimming around on the edge of my pond
Geographic location of the bug:  Tampa, Fl.
Date: 11/29/2017
Time: 03:11 PM EDT
Found these guys zooming around our pond. Tried to get closer for a shot but they zip off.
How you want your letter signed:  Curiously

Whirligig Beetles

These are Whirligig Beetles in the family Gyrinidae.  Of the genus DineutusBugGuide states: “Found on the surface of streams/rivers, ponds, lakes (can form rafts of immense numbers on lakes).” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Crazy looking flying something
Geographic location of the bug:  Bellingham washington
Date: 10/24/2017
Time: 12:33 PM EDT
Good day,
I was outside just as it was getting dark and I heard a weird bug flying around. Well it was a big something and then I notice a few more over by the house. It’s fall time here and nights get down to the 40’s.
I am sending a phone I took please feel free to use it.
How you want your letter signed:  TJA

Predaceous Diving Beetles

Dear TJA,
These are Predaceous Diving Beetles in the family Dytiscidae, but it is going to take someone with more expertise in the family to provide you with a species identification.  Though they are primarily aquatic, as you observed, they are capable of flight.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults with long hairs on hind tibiae and other modifications for swimming; move their hind legs together like oars, like Backswimmers do.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination