Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hairy, flying Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Michigan, USA
Date: 05/05/2019
Time: 10:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  this bug was loud as it buzzed by my head. Landed in mulch and burrowed in. I uncovered it to take pics – then it flew away. I regret, i was not able to get a pic while it was in flight.
It is about the size of a large bumble bee. Hairy body and legs beneath an oval shell. Six legs. Flecks of orange and brown on a shell with slight ivory stripes? Red dot above head. Front end and head are Black.
Many thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Ab

Bumblebee Flower Beetle

Dear Ab,
We identified your Bumblebee Flower Beetle,
Euphoria inda, in Beetles of North America by Arthur V. Evans where we learned “Adults often fly close to the ground, especially over piles of grass, edges of haystacks, compost piles, manure, and other plant debris.  They drink sap from the wounds on tree trunks and exposed roots, or feed on various flowers and ripe fruits.  According to BugGuide where it is called the Bumble Flower Beetle:  “Adults emerge in the late summer, overwinter, and then become active in the early spring, thus the bimodal curve in activity.”

Bumblebee Flower Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this??
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern california
Date: 04/29/2019
Time: 09:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I keep finding these in my soil when I am planting. They are usually a couple inches under the soil. Lived here 23 yrs and never saw them. This spring I’ve already found about 40. Should I be worried??
How you want your letter signed:  Worried gardener

Scarab Beetle Grub

Dear Worried gardener,
Though we cannot provide you with a definitive species, this is definitely the grub of a Scarab Beetle.  Many species of June Beetles have grubs that feed on the roots of grasses. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yet another Goldsmith “Bug” !
Geographic location of the bug:  Gloucester, Va
Date: 04/26/2019
Time: 03:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I wrote you back in 2015 when I found my 1st Goldsmith beetle. I have since found at least 1 or 2 each year in the same location… My garage!  Of course they are always moved to safety in the backyard, just as this one that I found today has been.  Just thought I’d share another picture of this glorious find!
How you want your letter signed:  Holly G

Goldsmith Beetle

Dear Holly G,
How wonderful to hear about your yearly Goldsmith Beetle sightings, though we have not been able to locate your 2015 request in our archives.  Because of your “catch and release” policy, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Goldsmith Beetle

Wonderful! Thank you so much!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Georgia, USA
Date: 04/22/2019
Time: 12:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! My name is Jessi and I’m doing a project in my photography course on bugs and I’m having trouble identifying this beetle, maybe you can help me? I found it in the morning at the beginning of april this year. Thank you!!
How you want your letter signed:  Jessica Yeszkonis

Unknown Scarab Beetle

Dear Jessi,
Since this is a photography course and not a biology course, perhaps you do not need species specificity.  This is a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae, but we cannot provide a species name at this time.  You can try browsing BugGuide for some possibilities.

Scarab Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Italian Insect Question
Geographic location of the bug:  Albenga, Italy (Liguria)
Date: 04/15/2019
Time: 10:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I now live in Italy and am having a difficult time finding a good resource to answer insect questions.
Today (April 15), I stumbled upon this curious critter chowing down or sleeping in thistle. I even tried to lift her body a little to get a better photo, but she was really locked into that place. Looking closely, I see hairs all over her body including a thicker patch on the underside. Is this some kind of hairy beetle? Yelp!
Thanks in advance for your wisdom. I would love to know a good go-to place to answer my insect questions. I’m seeing some beautiful beings here I’d like to identify.
How you want your letter signed:  Kenda

White-Spotted Rose Beetle

Dear Kenda,
This is indeed a hairy Beetle.  We are relatively certain it is a White-Spotted Rose Beetle, which we identified on RawBirds.com where it states:  “The White Spotted Rose Beetle
(Oxythyrea funesta) is plant eating (phytophagous) beetle in the family Cetonidaewhich is in the genus Oxythyrea. It is also known as The Mediterranean Spotted Chafer. Over wintering larvae, which feed on plant roots, emerge as beetles in late Spring. They feed on the flowers of a wide variety of plants up until early Autumn.”  This image on Insecta.Pro nicely illustrates the hair that covers the body.

White-Spotted Rose Beetle

Thank you very much Daniel! I really appreciate your knowledge and assistance! Do you recommend I use the Rawbirds.com site as my go-to site despite the fact they don’t specifically focus on Italy or is there a more Italy-specific site I can rely on?
Grazie mille,
Kenda

Hi Kenda,
Unfortunately, we have no recommendation for a good site for the average person to use to identify Italian insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle id needed
Geographic location of the bug:  Kitchen Creek Falls Trail, Cleveland Nat’l Forest,CA
Date: 03/20/2019
Time: 01:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  is this another Shining Leaf Chafer: Paracotalpa puncticollis ?
How you want your letter signed:  Terri V

Little Bear Scarab, we believe

Dear Terri,
We believe you have the genus correct, but we are not certain of the species, though because of its dark coloration, we are leaning toward a different Little Bear Scarab,
Paracotalpa ursina based on this BugGuide image from San Diego.  The posting includes a comment stating:  “Paracotalpa ursina, dark form. Very common in that area on Chamise this time of year.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination