Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle eating my grape leaves
Geographic location of the bug:  SC Kentucky
Date: 07/15/2019
Time: 05:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These beetles showed up almost over night and are eating all the leaves of what I think are grapes.
How you want your letter signed:  Brad Beach

Japanese Beetles feeding on grape leaves

Dear Brad,
Because they will eat the blossoms and leaves of so many prized garden plants including roses, blackberries and peaches as well as your grape vines, Japanese Beetles are among the most reviled, introduced species that affect home gardeners.  According to Featured Creatures:  “
More than 300 species of plants are known to be host to Japanese beetle.”  Your array of images makes for a perfect Japanese Beetle posting, including the image of the mating pair and the documentation of the damage to leaves, which Pearl calls “lace doilies.”

Mating Japanese Beetles

“Lace Doilies”:  Grape leaves eaten by Japanese Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Michigan
Date: 07/11/2019
Time: 05:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was wondering what kind of beetle this is? Have Japanese beetles also.
How you want your letter signed:  Kristine Degrace

Oriental Beetle

Dear Kristine,
In addition to Japanese Beetles, you also have Oriental Beetles,
Exomala orientalis, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “native to E. Asia, adventive in NA (*NS-GA to ON-WI-*MO), and spreading.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identification of beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Gujarat, india
Date: 06/30/2019
Time: 05:40 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Studying entomology
How you want your letter signed:  Ekta

Scarab Beetle:  Protaetia aurichalcea

Dear Ekta,
We believe we have correctly identified this Scarab Beetle as
Protaetia aurichalcea thanks to images on PXHere.  It is also pictured on India Biodiversity Portal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Grapevine Beetle ?
Geographic location of the bug:  NE Minnesota
Date: 07/08/2019
Time: 06:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wondering if this might be a grapevine beetle variation?
How you want your letter signed:  Bob

Maculate Flower Scarab

Dear Bob,
While this is not a Grapevine Beetle, this Flower Scarab is in the same family.  We believe we have correctly identified it as a Maculate Flower Scarab,
Gnorimella maculosa, thanks to Arthur V. Evans book Beetles of Eastern North America.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults found on a variety of flowering shrubs and trees, esp. Dogwood, wild rose, other Rosaceae (such as Rubus), tulip-tree (Liriodendron). The beetles presumably take nectar and/or pollen” and “rarely collected…”  We believe this is a new species for our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Seattle
Date: 07/03/2019
Time: 11:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This beetle has been making itself at home on my porchlight for a few days, ignoring spider nests near it. It’s about 2 inches long. Is it native to the NW?
How you want your letter signed:  Shannon

Ten Lined June Beetle

Dear Shannon,
This Ten Lined June Beetle is native to much of western North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs in my garden .potatoes?
Geographic location of the bug:  Wirtz Virginia
Date: 07/01/2019
Time: 11:13 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please help identify what this bug is? They come out when the day starts to heat up and I have been seeing some of them on my potato plants. I will upload 2 pictures
How you want your letter signed:  Lyn

Green June Beetles

Dear Lyn,
These are Green June Beetles and one appears to be laying eggs.  We do not think they are harming your potatoes.  According to BugGuide food preferences are:  “
Adults: Pollen; ripening fruits, especially peaches; and the fruit and leaves of many shrubs. Larvae: roots of many plants including: grasses, alfalfa, vegetables, tobacco, and ornamental plants.”  Adults seem to prefer sugary foods like sap and ripe fruit, and larvae are considered pests that eat the roots of laws grasses.  BugGuide also notes:  “The adults can often be seen in numbers flying just inches over turf.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination