Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Just finished looking at your page of beetles and think I have found mine. Found this specimen on my patio in Charleston, West Virginia, in July 2000. I am into the hobby of scrapbooking pictures and was including this one in my “Flora nd Fauna” album. Hope you enjoy.
S. Humphrey

Dear Sue,
Thank you for the awesome photos. We are sorry that in the interest of space, we could not include your artwork as presented, but we have included several of the better images. They are among the best photos of Dynastes tityus we have received. Your male specimen has impressive horns. I believe this enormous beetle intimidates photographers into making out of focus images.

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unknown Beetle
Dear Bugman,
Today I found this exquisite beetle in my back yard, unfortunately something else ha d found him first. : ( I was wondering if you would be able to tell me what kind of beetle he is as no-one I know has seen one like him before. I’ve included a couple of photographs below but I couldn’t find a way to make them any clearer with my camera. I hope they are okay. Thanks,
JP

Hi JP,
Though you did not indicate where you are located, since the Fiddler Beetle, Eupoecila australasiae, is an Australian species, we are deducing you are somewhere down under. Fiddler Beetles can have bright green markings or golden yellow markings. These scarab beetles feed on nectar, often from eucalyptus trees, and the beetle grubs feed on rotting wood.

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Hercules Beetle/Rhinoceros Beetle
(9/1/2003)  What’s this Beetle
My husband found this on one of our tomato plants this weekend. I have been searching the web trying to identify it but haven’t had any luck. We are located in Claremore, Oklahoma.
Thanks for your help
Teresa

Rhinoceros Beetle

Rhinoceros Beetle

Dear Teresa,
You have taken a beautiful photograph of a male Hercules Beetle, Dynastes tityus. We have only received photos of dead ones in the past which can be viewed on our beetle page. The female does not have horns. Sometimes they are called Unicorn Beetles or Rhinoceros Beetles depending upon the author, but our latest sources credit the common name to be Hercules, though the scientific name remains the same. A larger species is found in the West, Dynastes granti. Adults are reported to feed off the sap of trees , especially from the Ash family, and to eat figs, while the grubs eat leaf litter and rotten wood. Some great photos of mating couples of D. granti can be found on this site:
http://beetlegate.hyperlink.cz/beetles-sides/Dynastes_granti.htm
These are reportedly the most massive beetles in North America, though some Stag Beetles may be in contention for the record. Here is a photo of Dynastes tityus on a postage stamp issued in the U.S. in 1999.

U.S. Postage Stamp

U.S. Postage Stamp

Thank you so much for your response.  My husband ended up moving him the next day to a vacant field across the road because he found him on the ground in front of my barn and was afraid my horses would step on him and crush him. I hope he has a very long and productive life. I have never in my life seen a Beetle quite like him.
Thanks again
Teresa
I think you forgot to include the web address. My husband would really like
to see the picture of the postage stamp. Thanks again.
Teresa

U.S.  Postage Stamps

U.S. Postage Stamps


http://shop.usps.com/cgi-bin/vsbv/postal_store_non_ssl/browse_content/
pressRelease.jsp?CURSOR=116&BV_UseBVCookie=yes
>

Here is the entire sheet.

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I live in near central Oklahoma near the SW side of OKC. We have lateral lines (picture, if you will, 4 human fingers) that extend out of our septic tank. These lateral lines disseminate throughout the ground. Which means we have four long lines of well fertilized grass. This month, those lines were extremely tall and thick. In them and flying over them were these humongous flying critters. They resembled the size of a bumblebee. They became very active when I came near the lines with the riding lawnmower. Because I couldn’t get close enough to identify them (I’m allergic to bees), I can give you a general description:
They are very “heavy” looking. The backs of them sort of had a darkblack/green sheen to them and the bottom sort of had the appearance of black and yellow although I cannot confirm this. I thought maybe they were bumblebees but I had not ever seen the dark green on a bumblebee before. Of course, I’ve only seen one bumblebee in my entire life.
There were at one time, over a hundred of these buggers flying lazily around over the grass. They concentrated in that area only. The rest of the yard was free from these insects. I didn’t know if they had built themselves a home in the grass or they were attracted to them. They did become a little more aggressive in their flying when I came near them.
However, once the tall grass was mowed down, they were gone. Have any idea what they might be?
April Harrington

Dear April,
Green June Beetles are large and green with yellow undersides. They are known to be extremely plentiful at times, especially where there is horse manure present. I would guess that your septic tank attracted them, and the eggs were laid in the rich soil. When they emerged, they did so in vast numbers. They are harmless, though somewhat frightening.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beetle in Georgia
My wife came across a dead beetle of some sort. It is light green in color with mottled black spots on the wings. It is about 2″ long and has pincers that open top to bottom, not side to side. I have attached a picture for your review. Thanks for any help you can give us in this identification.
Dave B.
Columbus, Ga

Dear Dave,
I’m sure I answered your wife’s letter, though now can’t seem to find any record of it. She sent three photos of different views. It is a Unicorn Beetle, Dynastes tityus, a member of the scarab family prized by collectors. They are harmless.

Daniel,
Thanks for the quick response! Once you had been able to identify it, I was able to find additional pictures online. As an aside, my wife hasn’t sent any pictures in…so there are a couple of us who recently came across a beautiful specimen.
Thanks again!
Dave

We at What’s That Bug appologize to Dave and Lori because we confused their photograph with the following photograph which arrived in our offices two days before. They are remarkably similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

My wife came across a dead beetle of some sort. It is light green in color with mottled black spots on the wings. It is about 2″ long and has pincers that open top to bottom, not side to side. I have attached a picture for your review. Thanks for any help you can give us in this identification.
Dave B.
Columbus, Ga

Dear Dave,
I’m sure I answered your wife’s letter, though now can’t seem to find any record of it. She sent three photos of different views. It is a Unicorn Beetle, Dynastes tityus, a member of the scarab family prized by collectors. They are harmless.

Daniel,
Thanks for the quick response! Once you had been able to identify it, I was able
to find additional pictures online. As an aside, my wife hasn’t sent any pictures in…so there are a couple of us who recently came across a beautiful specimen.
Thanks again!
Dave

We at What’s That Bug appologize to Dave and Lori because we confused their photograph with the following photograph which arrived in our offices two days before. They are remarkably similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination