Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cape Town, South Africa
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 09:19 AM EDT
Saw this yesterday in our garden just chilling in the sun. Never seen anything like this before. After some research almost looks like an Elepant Weevil however it isn’t natuve to South Africa. Can you confirm or help identify please?
How you want your letter signed:  Michelle

Weevil

Dear Michelle,
This is definitely a Weevil or Snout Beetle in the family Curculionidae, and though we could not locate a similar looking individual on iSpot, we do have an unidentified Weevil from South Africa that looks very similar in our archives.

Weevil

Many thanks Daniel for the prompt response.
I will continue to search and will update you if we find anything new
regards
Michelle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Lampedusa, Italy
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 08:14 AM EDT
I’m currently staying on the island of Lampedusa and seeing some unfamiliar bugs. This was has just appeared on my balcony – I thought it some kind of bee at first but on closer inspection looks more like a furry beetle.
Also, am I better off leaving it or relocating it to an area with shrubs etc?
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Bumblebee Scarab

Dear Mike,
We are nearly certain that this is a Bumblebee Scarab in the family Glaphyridae.  Here is a Project Noah image of a member of the family and PICSSR has a nice image by YM Zhang that looks very similar to your individual.  Forum Entomologi Italiani has numberous images of members of this family, including this image of
Pygopleurus apicalis.  If you send your images to them and you get a response, please let us know.  According to The Scarabs of the Levant:  “Except for a few species, life histories of the glaphyrids are poorly documented. Adults are often brightly colored, densely setose, active diurnally, and strong fliers. Many species have colored setal bands on the abdomen and resemble various Hymenoptera (bumble bees and metallic bees). They are frequenting flowers (often red Ranuncolacee and Tulipa) and foliage.”

Bumblebee Scarab

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Todos Santos,  Baja California Sur
Date: 10/19/2017
Time: 10:45 PM EDT
Saw this one my front step and removed it to where it climbed a cardon cactus.
Wondering if you could tell me what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Karin

Elephant Beetle

Dear Karin,
We are not used to seeing Rhinoceros Beetles in the subfamily Dynastinae that are so hairy, but we located this BugGuide image of an Elephant Beetle that looks quite similar to your individual.  According to BugGuide:  “7 spp. of
Megasoma occur in the southwestern United States and Northern Mexico, only one of which occurs in Texas.”  We are confident the genus Megasoma is correct, but we cannot say for certain which species you encountered.  Here is a FlickR image of Megasoma theristes.

Elephant Beetle

Thank you for your prompt reply. Having looked at  FlickR image of Megasoma theristes,  
I am quite confident that it is very close to this one, especially since the location this one was photographed in is very close to Todos Santos, BCS, Mexico.
Karin
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Odd ladybug?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Texas – near Sanger
Date: 10/12/2017
Time: 02:56 PM EDT
My husband found this on our porch. I can’t find photos of a ladybug with those fuzzy things on its antenna. Thanks so much!
How you want your letter signed:  Nikie Cotter

Earth Boring Scarab Beetle

Dear Nikie,
This is not a Lady Beetle.  It is an Earth Boring Scarab Beetle in the family Geotrupidae, possibly in the genus
Bolbocerosoma based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Can you identify this beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central FL
Date: 10/10/2017
Time: 01:05 PM EDT
I found this bug coming out of my bathroom wall. Obviously now I know I have a rotten place near my shower. Can you tell me anything about this beetle and if I may have more where he came from?
How you want your letter signed:  Laura

Triceratops Beetle

Dear Laura,
After some searching on BugGuide, we believe we have correctly identified your Rhinoceros Beetle as
Phileurus truncatus, the Triceratops Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults come to lights. Larvae in rotten logs, esp. oaks. Adults can live up to two years in captivity.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Woodlands. Adults have been reported causing cabin fires by coming down chimneys, presumably attracted to fireplace smoke and spreading embers.”  According to Arthur V. Evans’ site Beetles of Eastern North America:  “The larvae probably feed on decomposing wood and its associate fungi, while the adults are known to prey on insects and are attracted to lights at night.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sylmar, California
Date: 10/02/2017
Time: 10:15 PM EDT
What kind of moth is this? I really want to know. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Anywhere

Lined June Beetle

Dear Anywhere,
This is not a moth.  It is a Lined June Beetle in the genus
Polyphylla, most likely the Ten Lined June Beetle, a common species found during the summer in Southern California.  This is late in the season for a sighting.  BugGuide does include September sightings in both Arizona and California, but there are no reported October sightings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination