Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Subject: Large Spinder
Location: Alvin, Texas
March 23, 2017 8:40 pm
We found this large spider on the front porch eating dinner. Then shortly found what we belive to be the father carrying the eggs on his back. Not sure what it is… if you could please help us identify them that would be cool.
Gulf Coast region
March – early spring
Warm outside
Signature: Robin Kralovetz

Female Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Robin,
The second Spider is a female Wolf Spider and she is carrying Spiderlings, not eggs.  Thanks so much for including the penny for scale as it provides a sense of the difference between the sizes of these two spiders.  The Spider with its prey is a much larger individual.  The carapace looks to us to resemble that of a Fishing Spider (see this BugGuide image) in the genus
Dolomedes rather than a Wolf Spider and Fishing Spiders are larger.  Wolf Spiders in the family Lycosidae and Fishing Spiders in the family Pisauridae are both hunting spiders that do not build webs to snare prey.  We may be wrong, bug we believe the larger spider is a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes.  The prey appears to be a Scarab Beetle.

Fishing Spider eats Scarab Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sedona mystery bug
Location: Sedona arizona
March 5, 2017 8:13 pm
Hello!
Just curious as to if you know what bug this is. He was seen crawling along the red rocks of cathedral rock all by himself.
Thanks,
Signature: Jaycee

Punctate Little Bear

Dear Jaycee,
This pretty Shining Leaf Chafer is commonly called the Punctate Little Bear,
Paracotalpa puncticollis, based on the Texas Beetle Information site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Kirstenbosch Bug
Location: Kirstenbosch National Botanic Gardens
February 26, 2017 10:17 am
I write a wildlife blog with photos I’ve taken from my travels. I want to properly identify these mating bugs so I can present correct information on their breeding habits, lifestyle, etc. This photo was taken at Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens in Cape Town, SA.
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Christian

Mating Small Flower Chafers

Do you have an image that does not have the flower petals obscuring the beetles?

Unfortunately, they were in the flowers for awhile. I have this above shot of them as well. Sadly, I don’t own a macro lens and wasn’t able to get extremely close to them because of lens focus constraints. My husband also brought up looking up known pollinators for this flower, so I may try that tactic as well.
Let me know if this helps!
Christian

Mating Small Flower Chafers

Dear Christian,
Thanks for sending a second view.  These are Scarab Beetles, and we suspect they are Fruit and Flower Chafers in the Subfamily Cetoniinae or Shining Leaf Chafers in the Subfamily Rutelinae.  Representing the Cetoniinae, they might be the Small fruit|flower chafer,
Leucocelis adspersa subsp. adspersa, which is pictured on iSpot in a single posting only.  There is a better image on the Flower Beetles site with the image here.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Photographs of
Location: Ancud, Isla de Chiloé, Los Lagos, Chile
February 4, 2017 12:04 pm
Hi there! I just wanted to know if I could share some of my photography of some beautiful insects which I have been lucky enough to capture. Anyhow, I am sending a few shots because there is the option to do so. Thanks and regards!
Signature: Misterknapp

Green Scarab Beetle: Brachysternus prasinus

Dear Misterknapp,
We believe we have correctly identified this beautiful green Scarab Beetle as
Brachysternus prasinus thanks to this FlickR posting and we verified that identification on Coleoptera Neotropical and on Forum Entomologi Italiani as well as on Barry Fotopage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I believe this may be a Giant Christmas Beetle?
Location: Cheltenham, Melbourne, Australia.
February 2, 2017 5:55 pm
G’day BUGMAN!!
Here is my photo of what I now believe is a Giant Christmas Beetle, as per our previous discussion & my wrongly identifying him as a Goldsmith Beetle.
For anyone else who maybe reading, this little guy (although quite big really) was buzzing around the car wash while I was washing my car on Nov 28 2016. He landed in a huge pile of suds in the corner of my wash bay. As I was rinsing my car at the time, I thought it might be a good idea to put the nozzle on as gentle as possible & wash some suds away & rinse him off. He wasn’t looking too good after his Sud pile dive, so I gently picked him up & moved him to a safe place & dry land 🙂 I would’ve taken him home to keep an eye on him, but I thought he’d been through enough stress for one night & freedom was probably more comforting than being carried around & stuck in a box. Plus I wasn’t sure what they eat.
Thank you for the link of where to post him for you Bugman & thank you for being BUGMAN!!
Have a fabulous day!
Signature: Kindest regards, manda.

Christmas Beetle

Dear Manda,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Christmas Beetle in the genus
Anoplognathus.  According to the Australian Museum:  “There are 36 species in the genus with all but one unique (endemic) to Australia and 21 species found in New South Wales. At least 10 species occur in the Sydney region – more if the Blue Mountains are included. Because they are such a feature of the eastern Australian experience some common species have been given English names, such as the Washerwoman, Anoplognathus porosus, and (rarer) King Beetle, Anoplognathus viridiaeneus (see photos, right). Distinguishing some species can be tricky, but it helps to examine the hairs on their ‘bums’ (posterior). (This is something of an in-joke among entomologists but it actually works for this group!)”  Based on the images included on the Australian Museum Christmas Beetle Project page, the markings on the elytra of your individual look most like theWasherwoman.

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Subject: Can you please help.
Location: Canberra Australia
January 31, 2017 2:09 am
Hello thank you for taking the time to help me out I am wondering if you can help me identify this bug? I’m in Canberra Australia and right now it’s summer thank you
Signature: Andy

Fiddler Beetle

Dear Andy,
Normally, we do not like to repeat our Bug of the Month designations, but submissions in January and February are at their lowest, and we just realized it is the Ten Year Anniversary of the Fiddler Beetle,
Eupoecila australasiae, from Australia being designated as the Bug of the Month on our site in February 2007.  According to the Australian Museum:  “Female Fiddler Beetles lay their eggs in rotting logs or in the damp soil under logs. The grubs feed on rotting timber and build cocoons of soil and debris in which they pupate.”  According to Museums Victoria:  “The adult beetles emerge in early summer. They are strong fliers and fly between eucalypt and other trees to feed on nectar. They are found in all states except for Western Australia and are harmless to humans.”  According to Climate Watch:  “It buzzes loudly while flying.”  The markings on the Fiddler Beetle can be green or yellow.

Fiddler Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination