Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Tomball Texas
Date: 09/27/2019
Time: 07:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just curious what kind of beetle it is. They are beautiful. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Brianne

Green June Beetle

Dear Brianne,
This is one of the Green June Beetles in the genus
Cotinis, but we are not certain of the species.  Texas is the western edge of the reported range of the Green June Beetle, Cotinis nitida, according to BugGuide data, and Texas is the eastern edge of the reported range of the Green Fig Beetle or Figeater, Cotinis mutabilis, according to BugGuide data.  To further complicate matters, we have learned that Tomball, Texas is just north of Houston, which opens up the possibility that this might be the South Texas Coastal Cotinis, Cotinis boylei, which is profiled on Texas Entomology, though we believe that to be the least likely of the three possible species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A June Bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Moorestown NJ, southern NJ
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 04:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was on the front steps during the afternoon. When I nudged it aside it hissed. It has large fuzzy antenna and yellow speckles on a black body. It is about an inch long.
How you want your letter signed:  Annette

Variegated June Beetle

Dear Annette,
Variegated June Beetles can produce a hissing sound by rubbing parts of their body together, an act known as stridulation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle with earslike antennas
Geographic location of the bug:  Carpathian Mountains, Romania
Date: 07/21/2019
Time: 03:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  The beetle makes a screeching sound and has a strong grip. Was attracted by light
How you want your letter signed:  Raz

Pine Chafer

Dear Raz,
The sounds this Pine Chafer makes by rubbing together parts of its body is called stridulation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetles on squash and tomatoes
Geographic location of the bug:  Williamsburg, MA
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 09:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi these beetles appeared overnight in my vegetable garden in Western Massachusetts, particularly on my tomatoes and squash. I’ve never seen them before and haven’t found them on the internet. Any ideas what they are and how I can get rid of them? Thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  Laura Garcia

Oriental Beetle

Dear Laura,
This sure looks like the invasive, exotic Oriental Beetle,
Exomala orientalis, to us.  We do not provide extermination advice, but the CABI Invasive Species Compendium has some information you might find helpful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cedar beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Barrie Ontario Canada
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 10:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wanting to know what this cool looking, moose antler, beetle is.
How you want your letter signed:  Stacey

June Beetle

Dear Stacey,
Though it looks similar, this is not a Cedar Beetle.  It is a Lined June Beetle, probably a Variegated June Beetle,
Polyphylla variolosa, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Eggs are laid on soil near host plants. Larvae hatch, burrow down and feed on roots of shrubs, trees, require 2-3 years to reach maturity. Pupation is in underground chambers. Adults come to lights.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle eating my grape leaves
Geographic location of the bug:  SC Kentucky
Date: 07/15/2019
Time: 05:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These beetles showed up almost over night and are eating all the leaves of what I think are grapes.
How you want your letter signed:  Brad Beach

Japanese Beetles feeding on grape leaves

Dear Brad,
Because they will eat the blossoms and leaves of so many prized garden plants including roses, blackberries and peaches as well as your grape vines, Japanese Beetles are among the most reviled, introduced species that affect home gardeners.  According to Featured Creatures:  “
More than 300 species of plants are known to be host to Japanese beetle.”  Your array of images makes for a perfect Japanese Beetle posting, including the image of the mating pair and the documentation of the damage to leaves, which Pearl calls “lace doilies.”

Mating Japanese Beetles

“Lace Doilies”:  Grape leaves eaten by Japanese Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination