Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  We found a bug in the screen door and don’t know what it is
Geographic location of the bug:  Rapid city South Dakota usa, around 9:30 am during summer
Date: 08/10/2018
Time: 12:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Pleaseeee help me I really want to know what this is! Anything you can do to help
How you want your letter signed:  I don’t care, just please help

Earth Boring Scarab Beetle

This is an Earth Boring Scarab Beetle in the family Geotrupidae, and we have identified it as a member of the genus Bolbocerosoma thanks to BugGuide, but we cannot provide a species identification at this time. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  San Antonio, TX
Date: 08/07/2018
Time: 11:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this dirt egg and picked it up and felt something moving inside .. What is it? It was under some Walnut slabs of wood and leaves I was cleaning up..
How you want your letter signed:  Bugman?

Ox Beetle Pupa

This is the pupa of a horned Scarab Beetle, and we believe it looks identical to this Ox Beetle pupa in the genus Strategus that is pictured on BugGuide.  The “dirt egg” is the pupal chamber.

Ox Beetle Pupa

Many thanks as I put the pics on Facebook as a challenge to identify…

Ox Beetle Pupal Chamber

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fig beetle or Green June Beetle!
Geographic location of the bug:  Fresno, CA
Date: 08/05/2018
Time: 01:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
My husband and I are at odds about this bug. He (the bug) was a pretty friendly guy who flew into several patrons hair at our local bar. Can you tell us what he is? We spotted him approximately mid-July.
How you want your letter signed:  Megan

Figeater

Hi Megan,
Common names for the same insect can vary from location to location, and that gets even more complicated because insects do not respect international borders, with or without walls, and many times the national language changes across the border.  To make things even more complicated, sometimes the same common name is used to describe more than one insect.  That is why the scientific community uses the universal binomial system to identify creatures, but even that gets complicated because sometimes more than one scientific name is used to describe the same insect, but eventually one of those names supersedes the other.  What’s That Bug? has always considered itself a pop culture insect site, so we frequently use common names in an effort to make us more friendly to the web browsing public which might find more scientific (and more reputable) sites off-putting because they are so scientific.  The genus
Cotinis is called, according to BugGuide, the Green June Beetles, so any member of the genus can be called by that common name.  A common species found from Texas east, Cotinis nitida, is commonly called a Fig-Eater or Green June Beetle, according to BugGuide, and a common western species, that is found in California, is Cotinis mutabilis, and according to BugGuide, it is commonly called the Green Fig Beetle, the Green Fruit Beetle or the Figeater Beetle.  Your species is the latter, so you may use any of the common names that specifically apply to the species, or the more general name Green June Beetle that applies to the entire genus.  That is a very long-winded explanation that distills down to the answer that both names are correct for your species, though here at What’s That Bug?, we like to use Figeater for the western species, so you both are correct.

Figeater

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of Beetle is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Creswell, MC
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 03:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what this is and if I have anything to worry about? Rather large and we have had alot of rain this week. Any info would be appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Michelle

Triceratops Beetle

Dear Michelle,
We are speculating that you are in Creswell, North Carolina, and if that is wrong, please clarify where MC is located.  This is a Triceratops Beetle,
Phileurus truncatus, and it poses no threat to you or your home.   According to BugGuide:  “Adults will take fruit and meat in captivity; may feed on other insects” and “Adults come to lights. Larvae in rotten logs, esp. oaks. Adults can live up to two years in captivity. Have structures for sound production (stridulation) and stridulate softly when handled (P. Coin, 11.vii.2007).  Larvae and adults are also ‘carnivorous’ and will – if not preferentially – feed on grubs & pupae of other scarabs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big weird-looking bug
Geographic location of the bug:  United States East Tennessee
Date: 08/01/2018
Time: 02:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought this to be a female rhinoceros beetle but I’m not very sure.
How you want your letter signed:  However you want to sign it

Female Eastern Hercules Beetle

This is indeed a female Eastern Hercules Beetle, and we have examples of dark individuals here and here in our own archives.  BugGuide also has images of dark individuals, and according to BugGuide:  “Huge size, greenish elytra with variable amounts of dark spots. Some are nearly black.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Bangalore ,india
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 01:25 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman,
I found this gorgeous fellow on my office floor. Would love to know more about him .
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Shweta

Flower Chafer: Protaetia aurichalcea

Dear Shweta,
This Scarab Beetle is one of the Fruit and Flower Chafers in the subfamily Cetoniinae, and we are confident we have identified it as Protaetia aurichalcea thanks to images on BioLib and  pxhere.  According to Biodiversity India:  “Flower chafers are a group of scarab beetles, comprising the subfamily Cetoniinae. Many species are diurnal and visit flowers for pollen and nectar, or to browse on the petals. Some species also feed on fruit. The group is also called fruit and flower chafers, flower beetles and flower scarabs. There are around 4,000 species, many of them still undescribed.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination