Currently viewing the category: "Scarab Beetles"
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Subject:  Identification Request
Location:  Reitvlei Nature Reserve, Johannesburg, South Africa
January 15, 2017
Hello Daniel,
I trust this note finds you well.
I need some help, again. Ref subj.! and attached.
I took this recently at the Reitvlei Nature Reserve near Jhb, not the best of photos, but will suffice.
I went back there last Saturday but they were ALL gone.
I thought some Scarab beetle of some description, ( They seemed to be fighting over
mating or territorial rights), but the big green ones
fly around sounding like bumble bees, which they are not.
I understand you are busy , but please let me know when you can.
The tip wilters are slowly growing into fully fledged ones.
I’ll send a pic when I can
Thanks again.
Gary

Giant Emerald Green Fruit Chafers and another Scarab species

Dear Gary,
The green Scarabs appear to be Giant Emerald Green Fruit Chafers,
Dicronorrhina derbyana subsp. derbyana, and the smaller brown Scarabs are definitely a different species, possibly the Zig Zag Fruit Chafers, Anisorrhina flavomaculata, which are pictured on iSpot.  In the future, please submit images using our standard form which can be accessed by clicking the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.

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Subject: Scarab beetle South Africa
Location: South Africa Lowveld
January 16, 2017 11:02 am
Hi. Can you identify this South Africa species? First time I have seen one. I live in the Lowveld in South Africa
Signature: Francois Lloyd

Giant Emerald Fruit Chafer

Dear Francois,
We identified your Scarab Beetle as a Giant Emerald Fruit Chafer, Dicronorrhina derbyana subsp. derbyana, thanks to images posted to iSpot.  According to iNaturalist:  “These attractive beetles are mainly present in Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Namibia, Zimbabwe and South Africa.”

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Subject: Beautiful Beatle from South Africa
Location: White River, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa
January 11, 2017 7:34 am
Hi there!
I came accross a beautiful bug in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa in the Lowveld. It is quite large and has a velvety feel over the wings with three orange and three white spots on each wing. It also has a snout that protrudes from its face. I found it close to the Lichi tree at my office in December which was bearing fruit. Do you maybe from the photograph attached know what type of beetle this is?
Signature: Regards, Pava

Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer

Dear Pava,
We confirmed the identification of this Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer,
Mecynorrhina passerinii, thanks to this image posted to iSpot.  According to iNaturalist:  “These beetles feed on sap of the Bridelia micrantha” and “This species can be found in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania.”  The “horn” on your individual indicates it is a male.  We have an image of a female Orange Spotted Fruit Chafer in our archives.

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Subject: Stink bug from South Africa?
Location: KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
January 10, 2017 10:03 am
Hi there! This chappy was found on the Indian ocean coast of South Africa – do you know if this is a type of stink bug? Thank you for all the wonderful work you do!
Signature: Cat from South Africa

Zig-Zag Fruit Chafer

Dear Cat,
This is NOT a Stink Bug.  It is a Scarab Beetle, and more specifically, we identified it as a Zig-Zag Fruit Chafer,
Anisorrhina flavomaculata, thanks to BioDiversity Explorer.  The species is also well represented on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scarab rhino squeaker mystery
Location: Townsville Australia
January 9, 2017 6:46 pm
Dear bugman,
We are in northern Queensland Au (nr Townsville) and found this beautiful beetle we can’t find with online searching. It is light brown, body is a little less than 2cm long and it has a very fancy rhino like head. It squeaks like an old wind up toy I think when it feels threatened and tries to dig / nibble quickly through anything.
Signature: Holly and Jake

Earth Boring Dung Beetle

Dear Holly and Jake,
We found some really close images of Earth Boring Dung Beetles in the family Geotrupidae from Australia, but alas, those pages seem to no longer be active, yet the images still exist in the search engines.  This Csiro Entomology page is the best we are able to provide, and it states:  “Members of this family are closely related to scarab beetles but can be distinguished from the later as they have one extra segment (11 in total) on their antennae, and the last 3 segments form a distinctive circular club. They are very stoutly built beetles and range in size from 8-30 millimetres in length. Most adults are reddish-brown to brown in colour, although a few may be black. The head and pronotum of male geotrupids is often adorned with prominent horns and as such members of this species are often called rhinoceros beetles. ”  

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Subject: Rhino Beetle
Location: Backyard, Krugersdorp, Gauteng, South Africa
December 17, 2016 6:57 am
I rescued this beetle from the swimming pool. Then we had a macro photo sesh while his wings dried. I placed him on a Marigold for visual contrast. Every time he tried to fly he crashed into an adjacent flower. Then he climbed down the plant and burrowed into the potting soil. What kind of Rhino beetle is he/she?
Signature: Stacey, www.TheArtistAnastasia.com

Fork Horned Rhinoceros Beetle

Fork Horned Rhinoceros Beetle

Dear Stacey,
Upon doing some research, we strongly suspect, thanks to images on iSpot, that this is a Fork Horned Rhinoceros Beetle,
Cyphonistes vallatus.  The species is also pictured on Encyclopedia of Life.

Fork Horned Rhinoceros Beetle

Fork Horned Rhinoceros Beetle

Fork Horned Rhinoceros Beetle

Fork Horned Rhinoceros Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination