Currently viewing the category: "Rove Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gnarly bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Kent, Great Britain
Date: 09/30/2017
Time: 05:37 PM EDT
Hi,
Found this bug in my bathroom a few days ago, is roughly 2-2.5inches long. Found a second, smaller one in kids bedroom this evening.
Brick built house, roughly 7years old. Just coming into autumn here in UK and weather has been approx. 15-20C the past week.
Hope that helps
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks  Ken

Devil’s Coach Horse

Dear Ken,
This is a predatory Rove Beetle that is commonly called a Devil’s Coach Horse.  According to Nature Spot:  “This beetle is found in damp conditions in most natural environments including: woodland, hedgerows, parks and gardens, where it relies on decaying natural matter.”  According to the Royal Horticultural Society:  “Two beetle families are largely ground dwelling and predatory and should be considered  gardener’s friends: ground beetles (Carabidae) and rove beetles (Staphylindae). …  The matt black devil’s coach horse (
Ocypus olens) is Britain’s largest rove beetle and is often found in gardens under logs or pots.”  Thank you for providing images of both the threat posture and the more relaxed position.  When threatened, the Devil’s Coach Horse will curve its abdomen over its head like a scorpion, but instead of stinging, it releases a foul odor.

Devil’s Coach Horse

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Boulder Colorado
August 6, 2017 1:56 pm
It does not have pinchers. Not an earwig and the legs are not long enough to be a nymph assassin bug. It was outside and not a threat to me but I’m just really curious what it is.
Signature: Michelle

Rove Beetle

Dear Michelle,
WE believe, based on this BugGuide image, that your Rove Beetle is
Platydracus immaculatusBugGuide states its habitat is “open habitats, esp. stony areas with sandy soil” and that it is “now infrequently collected over much of its range.”  This Rove Beetle poses no threat to you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Boston, MA
July 12, 2017 12:23 pm
Dear bugman,
We found this insect in Boston, Massachusetts. Any ideas on what it could be? He likes to hang out and rub his backside against the container. Its hard to see, but he has white/gray stripes (2 bands). His wings are yellowish and translucent.
Thank you,
Signature: Curious jr entomologist

Hairy Rove Beetle

Dear Curious Jr Entomologist,
We just posted another image of a Hairy Rove Beetle a few hours ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big flying unknown insect
Location: SE WISCONSIN
July 11, 2017 7:53 pm
I just moved into a new home this month. Today, I have seen 4 (possibly 5, might have seen the same one more than once) of these bugs. I have never seen this kind before and have had no luck with Google. All the ones I’ve seen are rather large, about a quarter size or more. I’m worried there’s some kind of nest or something since I’ve seen so many in one day. Also worries if they sting or anything, as I have 4 small children in the home. I am located in southeast wisconsin, in a rural area with farm fields all around us. Please solve this mystery for me!
Signature: KP

Hairy Rove Beetle

Dear KP,
We identified your Hairy Rove Beetle,
Creophilus maxillosus, thanks to Arthur V. Evans’ excellent book Beetles of Eastern North America where it states:  “Adults appear in late spring, again in late summer;  feed on maggots at carcasses in open, wooded, and coastal habitats;  not uncommon in urban and suburban habitats.”  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  According to BugGuide:  “food maggots and adult flies, also other arthropods” and the habitat is “grassy and open forested habitats, lake/ocean shorelines; on carrion (typically, larger carcasses), rarely on dung, compost, or at lights.”  If you are finding them indoors, perhaps there is a dead animal in immediate vicinity of the house.  From the descriptions, we would go on the record that this is a beneficial predator that helps to control populations of flies.  Rove beetles are not venomous, but Evans’ book does state:  “Produce an irritating defensive chemical at the tip of the abdomen.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Classic bug under a log
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
May 10, 2017 3:03 pm
Hello bugman, me an my girlfriend were out on an adventure flipping rocks and logs when we came across this little guy. I’ve been flipping rocks for many years now and don’t recall ever seeing this type of insect. When it moved it had its rear end in the air.
Signature: Kevin & Amber

Rove Beetle

Dear Kevin & Amber
This is a magnificent Rove Beetle.  We started by searching through Arthur V. Evans excellent book Beetles of North America where we identified this Rove Beetle as
Platydracus maculosus, a species that unfortunately has no common name.  Evans writes:  “the largest rove beetle in North America. … Adults active spring and summer, attracted to carrion, decaying fungi, and dung.”  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Loch lomond
April 3, 2017 1:23 pm
I saw this wee guy while walking up Ben Lomond.what is it?
Signature: Bug

Rove Beetle

Dear Bug,
This colorful Rove Beetle is
Staphylinus caesareus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination