Currently viewing the category: "Fungus Beetles and Pleasing Fungus Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s This Coleopteran?
Location: Chalalán Ecolodge, Madidi National Park, Aten Canton, Apolo Municipality, Franz Tamayo Province, La Paz Department, Bolivia
January 25, 2017 4:03 pm
These are two different individuals that I believe to be from the same family, if not genus. If possible, I would love to know what family that is. One is purple and black, and the other is white and black, and their elytra come to an arch or point in the center of their body. These were found and taken at Chalalán Ecolodge, Madidi National Park, Aten Canton, Apolo Municipality, Franz Tamayo Province, La Paz Department, Bolivia. This is a NT0166 Southwest Amazon Moist Forest WWF Ecoregion.
Signature: Thank you so much WTB

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Your purple beetle is a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the family Erotylidae, and this individual from Columbia in our archives shares characteristics with your individuals, so we are in agreement that both beetles are in the same family.  This image on Getty Images is only identified to the family level.  We located this cyan-blue individual on Project Noah that is identified as Cypherotylus cf. dromedarius, with the species name being a reference to the camel-like hump.  Insetologia, our sister site in Brazil has this wonderful posting. 

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: larvae
Location: NE Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia
November 20, 2016 11:17 am
Dear Bugman,
Can you help me identify these larvae? I found them under a decaying mushroom. The mushroom looked similar to a reishi mushroom. I found them on September 21, ’16,not far from my vegetable garden. The mushrooms were growing around the roots of a decaying maple tree trunk. There were other mushrooms just like this. Good bug, or not so for my garden? I left them for the birds to eat, also they were really cool looking.
Thanks for any help with this.
Signature: Best, Marie Cooney

Pleasing Fungus Beetle Larvae

Pleasing Fungus Beetle Larvae

Dear Marie,
Because you found them in association with a “decaying mushroom,” we took the chance that these might be Pleasing Fungus Beetle larvae, and our hunch proved correct based on this BugGuide image of
Megalodacne fasciata.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on bracket fungi. Adults overwinter under bark, often in groups.”  In our opinion, this is a benign or beneficial species in the garden.

YAY! Thank you so much for identifying, it was driving me crazy!
Best,
Marie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oak Tree Beetle
Location: Foothills east of Sacramento, Ca
August 1, 2016 7:11 am
I live in Northern California in the Sierra foothills. We recently had a large, established oak tree die. I noticed a couple nodes at the base that I was able to break off. I found an infestation of black and orange beetles. Trying to figure what they are, if they killed the tree or if they just move in after the tree is dead/dying. And what to do to make sure they don’t spread to our other trees.
Signature: Thank you, Ian

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Pleasing Fungus Beetles

Dear Ian,
These are Pleasing Fungus Beetles, probably
Megalodacne fasciata, and they are not responsible for the death of your oak tree, however, their presence is tied to the health of the tree.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae and adults feed on the fruiting bodies of fungi growing in decaying wood.”  So, as the tree began to die, it was invaded by the fungus and the fungus attracted the Pleasing Fungus Beetles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Classy black beetle with orange dot. Not a lady bug.
Location: Troy, VA
July 30, 2016 12:45 pm
I saw this beetle last night and I think he is terribly elegant. I’m very curious as to what it is, I can’t find beetles like it with one orange dot. He does, alas, seem to be missing at least one leg.
thank you
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Polyphore Fungus Beetle:  Penthe obliquata

Polyphore Fungus Beetle: Penthe obliquata

Dear Grace,
This is a Polyphore Fungus Beetle in the family Tetratomidae,
Penthe obliquata, and we identified it in Arthur E. Evans wonderful book “Beetles of Eastern North America”.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cockroach or beetle?
Location: Columbus, OH
July 21, 2016 4:19 am
Found this guy stuck on its back in my kitchen. I live in an old home (1920) in an urban neighborhood. I helped him out and got him on his feet but would like to know what exactly I helped. Is it a cockroach or a beetle?
Signature: Apprehensive helper

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Dear Apprehensive helper,
This is a Pleasing Fungus Beetle in the genus
Megalodacne which we identified on BugGuide where it states:  “Larvae feed on bracket fungi. Adults overwinter under bark, often in groups.”  Perhaps there is a large tree with mushrooms growing on it near your kitchen and this individual accidentally found its way indoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Beetle
Location: Cheyenne cannon, Colorado Springs , Co
June 14, 2016 10:10 am
Hi Mr. BugMan,
I found this wonderfully beautiful beetle out on a nature hike with my children. Let me rephrase we found about 50 of them on a pine log. I would love to know what specimen it is and if it is native to Colorado .
Signature: Stephanie Clements

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Dear Stephanie,
This Pleasing Fungus Beetle was likely emerging from the log after feeding  on fungus growing on the pine log as larvae.  According to The Firefly Forest:  “Pleasing Fungus Beetles (
Gibbifer californicus) are blue, fungus-loving beetles found in parts of Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Arizona, and Mexico. Here in Arizona, they are fairly common in moist riparian woodlands with large trees. Adult Pleasing Fungus Beetles emerge in the summertime and are most numerous during the summer monsoon rains.”  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on nectar, pollen, and some fungi. Larvae feed on wood-destroying fungi.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination