Currently viewing the category: "Pantry Beetles, Grain Weevils, Spider Beetles, Meal Worms and Carpet Beetles"
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Subject: Long pillbug with segmented thorax in my makeup!
Location: Az
February 21, 2016 1:46 am
I found this bug in my makeup in mid February, (and promptly threw out said makeup by the way). I’ve seen them before, usually when deep cleaning the grime out of the bottom of drawers (you know how hair and dust collects in the corners of bathroom drawers, and food in kitchen drawers?)It was about the size of a pantry bug, less than the size of a peppercorn, and just hanging out in my purple eye shadow, no waste/feces around it, in fact, it was sitting more on the exposed metal part of my makeup than in the powder. It looked fuzzy just along the sides and out was hard to tell if it had six or eight legs, but appeared more centipede like. It didn’t seem to do well in water (I freaked out a little when I saw it and flicked it into my just used sink. But it didn’t go down the drain once wet; I figured it was dead (it wasn’t moving), so I snapped a few pics and would come back to check later, leaving it so I could try and look it up). I came back a few hours later to find that it had crawled away and my search on the Internet turned up nothing. And so I found you, the bugman!
Signature: Grossed out but curious

Carpet Beetle Larva

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Grossed out but curious,
This is a Carpet Beetle Larva, a common household pest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug
Location: New Brunswick
February 3, 2016 12:06 pm
Hi I have these little bugs infesting my apartment. They are in my pantry, my floor, my closet, and around my cats food. I’m so annoyed by them and want to get rid of them.
Signature: Helppp please

Possibly Sawtooth Grain Beetles

Possibly Sawtooth Grain Beetles

These sure look like Sawtooth Grain Beetles, Oryzaephilus surinamensis, to us, though there is not enough detail to be certain.  They might also be the closely related Merchant Grain Beetle, Oryzaephilus mercator, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults and larvae feed primarily on cereal products, particularly oatmeal, bran, shelled sunflower seeds, rolled oats, and brown rice; usually associated with oilseeds and less with cereal grains and in most regions damages processed cereals, especially those with high oil content; also feeds on seed-borne fungi”  You may compare your image to the images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Ontario, Canada
January 22, 2016 6:57 am
So i was in my closet looking for a shirt to wear and i seen this bug, if you could tell me what it is, it would be really helpful. The bug was about 1cm long.
Signature: Please help

Larder Beetle

Larder Beetle

This is a Larder Beetle, a common household pest.  According to the Penn State Department of Entomology site:  “The larder beetle is a commercial pest as well as a household pest. This is a cosmopolitan species which was historically a pest of cured meats in Europe, the United States, and Canada. The use of refrigeration, the purchase of meats in small quantities, and the lack of home curing of meats, have decreased the economic importance of this insect. However, these beetles are still common in homes, museums, mills, livestock facilities, and any place that contains a suitable food source. Typically, these would include any animal by-product such as dried dog food, furs, hides, and feathers. Also, many pantry items can become infested. Another potential food source are dead insects in attic and wall voids that become trapped when they seek an overwintering site. In the fall insects such as flies, bugs, beetles and wasps, accumulate in attics and similar spaces in the home. Many of the hibernating insects die, attracting larder beetles which lay eggs on dead insects. The larvae of the larder beetle then feed on the dead insects.”  The site also states:  “Major injury occurs from larval feeding and the boring of the larvae before pupation. Larder beetles will attack stored ham, bacon, other meats, cheeses, tobacco, dried fish, dried museum specimens, and pet foods, for example. The larvae will bore into any commodity containing meat products; they have also been known to bore into structural timbers. Tests have shown that they can bore into lead with ease and tin with some difficulty. The boring is for the purpose of providing a protected place for pupation, not for feeding.”  Your synthetic clothing is not in danger of being damaged by Larder Beetles, but your feather boas, mink coats and leather goods may all be damaged.  If you have a big bargain bag of dog food in the home, you should check it as a site of infestation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A bug came out of my nose!!!
Location: Southern California
December 18, 2015 9:39 am
I blew my nose and this little tiny bug ant size probably smaller came out of my nose! Its winter time and its crazy cold in southern Cali nothing normal about this cold weather in 2015 . I have a window open next to my bed but there is a screen. This happened when I woke up.
Signature: Bugs in my nose

Carpet Beetle Larva, perhaps

Carpet Beetle Larva, perhaps

This looks to us like a Carpet Beetle Larva from the genus Anthrenus, though it seems to be lacking hair.  That may be the result of being blown out of your nose.  Though Carpet Beetle Larvae are a common household pest, we cannot fathom why it was in your nose.  Perhaps you just inhaled it while sleeping.  Carpet Beetle Larvae are often found in beds.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle in warehouse
Location: Huntington Beach CA
December 7, 2015 6:47 am
We are a non-profit pet food bank that has recently been infested with beetles. These black/ iridescent green beetle seem to get into the pet food. They crawl and fly. We would like to know what they are, and how to get them out into the outside. They are not grain beetles like we have seen before. Our food is too precious for the animal rescues to have to throw it away. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanx!
Signature: Renee, The Pet Food Bank

Pantry Pest

Red Legged Ham Beetle

Dear Renee,
There is not much detail in your submitted image, but we can tell you that there are numerous beetles in different families, including Dermestidae, Ptinidae, Tenebrionidae and Curculionidae that will infest stored foods.  See the Penn State University Department of Entomology site for some typical culprits.  We are not familiar with a black/iridescent green pantry pest, but with global travel and trade, many heretofore unknown creatures are establishing themselves in new locations.  Once the adult stages make themselves known, the best route to eliminating an infestation is to remove all stored pantry products that might be infested.  Eggs and larvae often go unnoticed, and it is not until the adults leave the food source that the infestation is discovered, and by that time it might be too late.

Update:  December 10, 2015
Daniel,
here is a better photo of the culprit. I appreciate the any info you have. They seem to like the pet food, cardboard, and wood pallets…guess they are not picky! We must be a buffet for them!
I did contact Penn state, they referred UC Davis, and they never responded. Then we contacted UC Riverside, and no response either.
Thanx for all your help.

Unknown Pantry Pest

Red Legged Ham Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found a bunch of these together
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
November 6, 2015 6:30 pm
We found these bugs crawling on the floor of our son’s room. Many of them were dead, but there were plenty of live ones, too. They were mostly located in about a 2 square foot area.
Thank you,
Signature: Tom

Carpet Beetle Larvae

Carpet Beetle Larvae

Dear Tom,
You are being troubled by Variegated Carpet Beetle Larvae,
Anthrenus verbasci.   According to BugGuide, they feed on a:  “wide variety of materials of animal origin (wool, fur, skins…); stored food materials and products (biscuits, cakes, seeds, wheat, maize, oats, rice, cayenne pepper, cacao, and dried cheese); …  RemarksThe most abundant species in buildings; arguably, world’s most important pest of insect collections. Adults from indoor populations have a negative attraction to light, but near the end of their oviposition period they become attracted to light. Adults from outdoor populations show attraction to light. Adults are active fliers and often fly high above the ground. They enter houses through open windows, around eaves, soffits, and attic vents, and often lay eggs in the dead insects collecting in light fixtures.”  The large quantity of individuals in a confined location indicates there is a plentiful food supply.  Perhaps more vacuuming will help.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination