Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Amazing. I have searched the web for a few days, identify a bug sites, all kinds of crazy stuff. Nothing. No where. I email you and you instantly know what it is. I attached the pictures of the one specimin I photographed closely. I googled up a bunch of photos. But the photos I have seen of live ones and what not, if there are no very close relatives, that is it.
You said they are European imports. So they are already across the United States? They are in Salt Lake City anyway. A little more reading on them, they say they raise up like a scorpion when scared, release a stinky smell from their abdomen (true) does not sting but can give a painful bite. We are not gardeners, we live in brand new apartments, and we are finding them in our house. Should something be done? Or should we just scoop them up and let them outside? Thanks again on identifying it, with such a vague description really. Best site 🙂
google.com search identify a font.
The site, identifies fonts, asks one question at a time, and identifies the font, to 2 or three fonts out of like 10,000 fonts. A bug site like that, would be amazing. I’m not much of a bug expert, but if you wanted any design help for such a site, let me know.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dear What’s that Bug,
I live in Chicago in a two-flat. My husband and I are moving in two weeks and I’m worried because we have noticed some new bugs appearing in our bathroom. We have lived here for a year and have never seen these bugs prior to last week. Now they are showing up every other night in our bathtub, five at a time. They are little tiny black bugs (about 1/4") and they don’t move. I thought they were dead, but upon further inspection I realized that they were just still & when prodded they moved their legs a little. They didn’t look like roaches, but I can’t help but panic. The only other bugs we’ve ever seen here are silverfish. Could they be baby silverfish?? So far I’ve found about 20 of them over the past week, mostly in the bathtub, though one was in the sink, five on the floor and one made it to the kitchen floor (near the sink). Any words of advice? Anything we can do to keep them from coming with us when we move in 2 weeks?
Thanks, C&J

Dear C&J,
Sounds like pantry beetles which seem to be very plentiful everywhere right now. clean out the pantry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Thank God for your site! We just finished our basement and the other morning my 2 1/2 year old daughter came running up the basement stairs shouting about a BIG bug. I thought it was going to be an ant, but it was a Stag Beetle even larger than the one in the photo sent to you by Lynn in Massachusetts. Ours was nearly three inches long and it was dark brown. I am writing because of your comment about the beetle enjoying rotting wood. Do you think this means I have rotting wood in my house or did this really scary creature get lost?
Much appreciated!
Kim

Dear Kim,
It could be rotting wood, in which case you should think of the Stag Beetle as an early alert. It is also
reputed that the beetles, which can fly, are attracted to lights, in which case your visit could be benign.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

We have Hundreds maybe Thousands on the ground and
all over our house. Please help us as my 6 and 4 year olds are scared and me too!
aceman

We were unable to anwer this reader who should be somewhat afraid of Blister Beetles which can cause a skin reaction.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi,
I found a beetle while hiking the woods in Plymouth Massachusetts. It looks like a big japanese beetle with what looks like a shield or hood behind its head, and has a horn like a rhino. It’s about 3/4 long. It was found near scrub oaks and fields. It’s dead probably from the cold. Any idea what it might be?
Thanks
Ken

Dear Ken,
You made a good call all around. Not only does your beetle look like a rhinoceros, it is named for one. The rhinoceros beetle, Xyloryctes jamaicensis, and its relatives the ox beetle and the unicorn beetle, are all horned members of the scarab beetle family which includes dung beetles, june beetles and japanese beetles. Check out this website for more information: http://insects.tamu.edu/images/insects/fieldguide

Dear Mr. Bug Man,
These live in my compost pile. They seem to be good for the decomposition, because they eat the contents of the pile and excrete them in a much-broken-down-form. But: what the hell? Big as my pinkie. Jerusalem Cricket?
Thanks,
Sean Dungan


Dear Sean,
Despite the suspiciously similar appearance to the killer "graboids" from the movie Tremors, your grub is just a grub, in this case the larval form of the Green Fruit Beetle (Cotinus mutabilis). Any observant insect watcher in Southern California, Arizona or Mexico has surely seen these enormous metalic green scarabs which take flight in August and September, buzzing noisily and circling clumsily in their search for fruit, namely figs, peaches, apricot
s, nectarines, grapes and cactus fruit which is the wild host plant. Originally native to Arizona and New Mexico, the beetle has moved west and is now relatively common in the Los Angeles Basin. Eggs are laid in compost piles, and the grubs, which can reach 2 inches in length, are sometimes called "crawly-backs" because of their method of locomotion, which involves undulating the body and pushing against the substratum with short stout bristles on the back of the thorax. The grubs feed on decaying vegetation, and are beneficial to the compost pile.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello: What’s this beetle??!! It was found in western Colorado near Grand
Junction. It’s about 45 mm long, dark brown, long antenna, see
pictures….. Thank you!

They are beautiful photographs of a California Prionus. See following letter for more details.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination