Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Midlothian, Virginia, USA
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 11:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what this bug is ? It is about 1.5” long, black.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Dennis Shand

Tile Horned Prionus

Dear Dennis,
This is an impressive Tile Horned Prionus,
Prionus imbricornis, and according to BugGuide:  “Huge longhorn, dark brown and shining. Antennae have 18-20 overlapping segments (male).  Female has 16-18 serrated segments. Other eastern Prionus have 12-13 antennal segments.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please identify this green bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Gun Flint Trail in Northern Minnesota
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 03:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was standing on a dock by a lake for just a few minutes and after I got back in the car I felt something crawling in my hair. I found this green bug. He crawled but I never saw him fly so I am not sure if he could or not. I took this picture of it before letting it go back outside.
How you want your letter signed:  Jayne Pietsch

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Dear Jayne,
As you can see from this BugGuide image, you encountered a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe (widespread there), adventive in NA, established in the northeast” and it feed on “primarily Yellow Birch.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please help me with identification of this beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
Date: 08/14/2018
Time: 01:16 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify the yellow beetle. Is it a blister beetle if so the species please
How you want your letter signed:  Shakeela

Blister Beetle

Dear Shakeela,
While we concur that this is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, we cannot provide a more specific identification at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Well-camouflaged beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Burns, TN 37029 (Montgomery Bell State Park)
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 12:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi–
I saw this bug on July 23rd of this year and was impressed by its effective camouflage on the decaying bridge rail. It looks somewhat like a Southwestern Ironclad Beetle, but Tennessee is well out of that beetle’s range. Any idea what else it could be?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in Tennessee

Avocado Weevil

Dear Curious in Tennessee,
We agree that your beetle resembles the Ironclad Beetle found from Texas westward, and we thought it resembled a Weevil, so we searched through Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans and we quickly located the Avocado Weevil,
Heilipus apiatus.  The book states:  “Adults are found year-round, but reach peak activity in summer, found on sassafras (Sassafras) and under pine (Pinus) bark.  Adults and larvae are serious pests of avocados (Persea); adults eat young fruits, while larvae bore and develop in base of trunk.  Virginia to Florida west to Tennessee.”  There are images on Forestry Images and on BugGuide.

Perfect! Many thanks for your quick reply. I’m going share your reply with my curious Facebook friends and encourage donations to WTB.
Best,
Maria
(aka Curious in Tennessee)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large flying beetle Spain
Geographic location of the bug:  Granada province, Andalucia,  southern Spain
Date: 08/11/2018
Time: 04:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Struggling to identify this large, flying beetle in southern Spain. Predominanlty black but with distinctive mottle-like markings. This one is about an inch but I’ve seen ones maybe 2 inches at their largest. They seem to like our cherry tree saplings if that’s helpful. When you approach they crawl round the other side of the branch – making photo-taking difficult (!) and if that doesn’t work they drop off the tree into the leaf litter. They appear around July/August time.  Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  Tom, Spain

Capnodis tenebrionis

Dear Tom,
This is a Metallic Borer Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and we have identified it as
 Capnodis tenebrionis thanks to this image on FlickR.  According to Koppert Biological Systems:  “Capnodis tenebrionis is one of the most important pests in cultivated stone fruit (f.e. cherries, apricots and almonds) and in some cases seed fruit (apples and pears). … Both adult beetles and larvae damage plants. Adults feed on twigs and young branches mainly causing problems in tree nurseries and young plants. The greatest damage is caused by the larvae. Immediately after hatching they penetrate into the roots of the trees and feed on the cortex. They form long sinuous galleries full of sawdust. Young trees die as a result of this damage. A few larvae can also cause the death of an adult tree in 1 or 2 years.”  A suggestion for the organic control of Capnodis tenebrionis is also provided on that site.  Good luck saving your cherry trees.

Hi there Daniel,
Thank you very much for the speedy response and identification. Looks like my cherry trees are in for it.
Have you got a paypal account for donations? – Signing up for patreon.com and going through the options is quite time-consuming.
I’d just like to make a quick donation in gratitude for the response.
Thanks, Tom

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this Texas bug
Geographic location of the bug:  South Central Texas
Date: 08/11/2018
Time: 12:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Would you please identify this bug
How you want your letter signed:  Bug

Eyed Elater

Dear Bug,
No other North American beetle looks quite like the distinctive Eyed Elater.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination