Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Blister Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Potholes State Park, Grant County, WA
Date: 09/06/2018
Time: 09:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Spotted several unusual beetles on vegetation in the process of conducting a cultural resource technical visit.  While not an entymologist, some google research suggests that the beetles are Lytta magister (also known as the desert blister beetle or master blister beetle). If so, they seem a little out of their defined range and season; as they are reportedly out in the spring. I see that someone in WA came across one in 2011 http://myhorseforum.com/threads/blister-beetles.152491/page-2
Invasive species? Climate change?
How you want your letter signed:  Mr.? not sure what is meant by this question

Lytta vulnerata mating

Dear Mr,
We would have also concluded that these appear to be Master Blister Beetles, but additional research on BugGuide led to images of the closely related
Lytta vulnerata which is reported from Washington.  We cannot distinguish any appreciable differences in their appearance, so we are basing the identification solely on the reported range of the species.  That research also led us to a sighting on our own site that should also be corrected.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  jewel beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  San Jose del Cabo, BCS, Mexico
Date: 09/06/2018
Time: 05:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please identify this beetle? It’s about 1.5 inches long
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Hubbard

Ruby Click Beetle

Dear Mike,
While this is NOT a Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, it is a beetle with a jewel mentioned in its common name.  It is a Ruby Click Beetle,
Chalcolepidius rubripennis.  The Ruby Click Beetle is well represented on iNaturalist

Ruby Click Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help with Bug ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Vila Velha, Brazil
Your letter to the bugman:  I am six years old and living in Brazil for a year.  I rescued this interesting bug from a swimming pool and want to know what it is.  My dad is helping me type this message.  Thank you for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  From Nadia F.

Darkling Beetle

Dear Nadia,
This is a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae.  Because of your kind act of rescuing this Darkling Beetle from a swimming pool, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  yellow black bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Indianapolis
Date: 09/03/2018
Time: 10:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug on a love-lies bleeding plant. he was waiting for the breeze to come and when it did he flew away.
see on you tube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBS0IEzvVpc
How you want your letter signed:  yellow black bug

Locust Borer

The Locust Borer is a common beetle found where the larval food plant, black locust, is found.  Adult Locust Borers are excellent Yellowjacket mimics, and they are often found on autumn flowers, especially goldenrod.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth- western australia
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 02:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Bug was found in lawn when removing african beetles.
Is over 6mm in length.
Wondering what the beetle is and if it is destructive to plants or harmful to pets
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Daniel Jones

Devil’s Coach Horse

Dear Daniel,
Because of its red head, this is an amazing looking Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, and we identified it as
Creophilus erythrocephalus, commonly called a Devil’s Coach Horse, thanks to images on Wild South Australia.  According to Museums Victoria:  “Devil’s Coach Horses eat maggots (fly larvae) and are usually found living in rotting animal carcasses.”  While that might seem unsavory, we would consider them beneficial as they help to control Fly populations.  The species is also pictured on Atlas of Living Australia.  The common name Devil’s Coach Horse is also used with a European species of Rove Beetle that has naturalized in North America.  This Devil’s Coach Horse does not look like it died of natural causes, so we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Devil’s Coach Horse

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and yellow bug
Geographic location of the bug:  NE Oklahoma
Date: 08/31/2018
Time: 08:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey bugman-
Tgaese are invading myhome. They are everywhere – walls, ceilings counter tops and even floor.  It hasn’t bitten or stung any one. . . Yet.
How you want your letter signed:  Cyndiluwho

Striped Blister Beetle

Dear Cyndiluwho,
This is a Striped Blister Beetle,
Epicauta vittata, and according to BugGuide: “Feeds on variety of plants, especially Solanaceae (e.g., potatoes, tomatoes), also soybeans, other crops. Pigweed, Amaranthus species, not a crop plant, is also fed upon extensively.” This is an outdoor species that occasionally enters homes accidentally, so we don’t know why you are finding so many indoors.  According to Featured Creatures:  “The adults are most active during the morning and late afternoon, seeking shelter from the sun at mid-day. In particularly hot, arid climates they remain inactive during the day, confining their activity to the evening hours.”  That site also notes:  “Striped blister beetle is one of the most damaging of the blister beetles to vegetable crops in areas where it occurs. This is due to its feeding preferences, which include several common crops and greater preference for foliage than some other species; its propensity to feed on fruits of solanaceous plants; its relatively large size and voracious appetite; its strong tendency to aggregate into large mating and feeding swarms; and its high degree of dispersiveness, which can result in sudden appearance of large swarms of beetles. … The damage caused by Epicauta spp. blister beetles is offset, at least during periods of relatively low beetle density, by the predatory behavior of blister beetle larvae. Epicauta spp. larvae feed on the eggs of grasshoppers, including many crop-damaging Melanoplus spp. During periods of grasshopper abundance the number of blister beetles tends to increase substantially.”  Blister Beetles should be handled with caution since some species are capable of secreting a compound, cantharidin, that is known to cause blistering in sensitive individuals.  We have selected your submission as our Bug of the Month for September 2018.

Striped Blister Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination