Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetles Matting
Geographic location of the bug:peter Laugheed Park, Alberta, Canada
Date: 08/11/2019
Time: 12:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found these bettles matting on Foxtail Barley along lake shore. Currious as to what they are.
How you want your letter signed:  Larry Halverson

Mating Red Turnip Beetles

Dear Larry,
Because we quickly recognized these as Leaf Beetles in the family Chrysomelidae, we were able to identify them as mating Red Turnip Beetles,
Entomoscelis americana, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “occasional pest of canola, rapeseed and mustard in the northern Great Plains; may also damage other crucifer crops (turnips, cabbage). Larvae and adults feed on plants at night.”

Mating Red Turnip Beetles

Thanks for your quick responce. Very interesting – Will let my son-in-law (a canola farmer) know about these as he saw them too although his farm is hunders of miles away
larry
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant something in garage
Geographic location of the bug:  North East Utah
Date: 08/08/2019
Time: 11:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this thing in my garage. We have an inground pool and do leave outdoor lights on at night.
Should I be scared or should I fryM up?
How you want your letter signed:  Bug Master

Male Root Borer

Dear Bug Master,
This is a Root Borer in the genus
Prionus, and we strongly suspect it is a California Root Borer, Prionus californicus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Despite its name, the California Root Borer’s range includes much of western North America.  We would not rule out that it might be Prionus heroicus, which is also reported from Utah on BugGuide.  Either way, those impressive antennae indicate this is a male Root Borer.  Root Borers have powerful mandibles, so they should be handled with caution, but they are not considered dangerous.  Many species are attracted to lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Avon, NY
Date: 08/10/2019
Time: 01:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found it at night on our patio. About 2.5 inches long. Wings covered with brown somewhat  translucent hard shells. Moving vigorously around,  non aggressive. We moved it carefully to nearby meadow. What is this bug? Many thanks to whomever can give us a clue.
How you want your letter signed:  Nature lover.

Brown Prionid

Dear Nature Lover,
Orthosoma brunneum which is pictured on BugGuide is commonly called a Brown Prionid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Winnipeg mb Canada
Date: 08/07/2019
Time: 06:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I took this photo June 24,2019, there is a interpretative centre where I took the pic with research material and I looked online and cannot identify it, The closest I found was a Festive Tiger Beetle but no where close enough. I spoke to an entomologist still no luck.   Any assistance will be appreciated. Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Steve Baxter

Nuttall’s Blister Beetle

Dear Steve,
Your images are positively gorgeous, and they beautifully represent this Nuttall’s Blister Beetle,
Lytta nuttalli, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on legumes” and the flower in your image does look to us like a legume.  Blister Beetles in the family Meloidae should be handled with caution as many species can exude hemolymph containing the blistering compound cantharidin.  The infamous aphrodesiac Spanish Fly is produced by crushing the bodies of a Spanish Blister Beetle.

Nuttall’s Blister Beetle

Thank you for the information. I have recently retired and bought a new camera and a macro lens and discovered  there really are a lot of interesting insects. I am enclosing a couple interesting photos, 1 a great picture of a Monarch butterfly, and the second which I didn’t notice the ladybug is chowing down the aphids on the plant. Thanks again for your assistance.
Steve
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Frost Mountain, Kittitas County,WA
Date: 08/01/2019
Time: 02:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My wife photographed this beetle while we were camped at Frost Mountain, WA, 7/29/19. It’s back appears to be a leaf, but it looks like it’s actually a part of it’s body. What is it and is the “leaf” a real leaf that the beetle attached to itself or is it something the beetle was born with?
How you want your letter signed:  Kevin Rust

Flower Longhorn: Pachyta armata

Dear Kevin,
This is a beautiful Beetle, and it is all Beetle with no leaf.  We started by searching for Flower Longhorns in the subfamily Lepturinae, but without much luck.  Then we found a thumbnail on Hiveminer that led us to this FlickR posting of
Pachyta armataBugGuide has many images, but not much information.  iNaturalist also has images, and not much information, but sightings apparently peak in July/August.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown bee
Geographic location of the bug:  Vancouver island B.C.
Date: 07/30/2019
Time: 06:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This noisy bee landed on the end of a log and eventually crawled underneath.
How you want your letter signed:  Richard

Lion Beetle

Dear Richard,
Though this looks very much like a Bee, it is not.  One can’t even begin to contemplate the complexity of the transformational events that caused this Lion Beetle,
Ulochaetes leoninus, to mimic the appearance and behavior of a stinging insect for protection from predators and other threats that have learned to avoid aposomatic or warning colors and markings after having first been stung.  The first time we received an identification request for a Lion Beetle, we were quite confused ourselves.

Lion Beetle

Hello Daniel,
thanks so much for the identification.  We did our best with images but no luck.  We were beekeepers for a few years and were puzzled by this critter. The loin like tuft of fuzz like a bumblebee on a body most resembling a queen honey bee was a strange sight.  I’m grateful to have had a chance to see one fly and land close enough to take a couple of photos.
Cheers,
RIchard

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination