Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Minnesota
Date: 06/08/2018
Time: 09:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what these are and why they are borrowing into the ground at my oak tree? There’s a bunch of them!
How you want your letter signed:  Brian

Stag Beetles Emerging after Metamorphosis

Dear Brian,
We wish you had more clarity in your amazing image of what we believe to be Stag Beetles emerging from the ground after metamorphosis, because we would like to be able to see details in the antennae.  We suspect your Stag Beetles are Lucanus placidus based on an image on The University of Minnesota Yard and Garden News page where it states:  “People have been finding stag beetles in their yards and gardens recently, sometimes in large numbers. Also known as pinching bugs, these beetles typically measure a little more than one inch in size and are reddish brown to dark brown in color. Stag beetles resemble June beetles but have more prominent heads. The mandibles (jaws) of both sexes are also large and conspicuous, especially those of males. Stag beetles have short antennae with conspicuous asymmetrical plates (lobes) at the end of them which they are not able to close together. One of the most common species in Minnesota is Lucanus placidusAll stag beetle larvae feed in dead or decaying wood, such as logs and stumps. Most adults emerge in May or June and feed on sap that exudes from plants. Stag beetles are active at night and are often attracted to lights. They can fly into a yard, land on the ground and remain there until the following morning. Some people have observed stag beetles emerging from the ground. This indicates that there are some old roots or other buried decaying wood where the larvae were feeding and developing.  Although a lot of stag beetles in a yard is annoying, they are harmless to people and property. Do not spray stag beetles, their control isn’t necessary. Just ignore them until they go away on their own.”  Elsewhere on the University of Minnesota site it states:  “Beneficial as a recycler of decaying wood; does not harm people or damage turf or trees.”  

Stag Beetles

Thank you for your response! I appreciate it. 
Brian Norby
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Ellivott, Colorado
Date: 06/08/2018
Time: 08:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would like to know what these beetles are eating up my garden
How you want your letter signed:  Lisa Rascon

Spotted Blister Beetle

Dear Lisa,
We are quite confident that we have identified your Blister Beetle as a Spotted Blister Beetle,
Epicauta maculata, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  The larvae of Spotted Blister Beetles feed on Grasshopper eggs, but adults are plant feeders as you have experienced.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is it some kind of Long horned beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Puerto Rico
Date: 05/31/2018
Time: 08:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What bug is this?? I’m a NYS resident but my mother sent me these pics from bro home in Puerto Rico.
How you want your letter signed:  Santos Collazo

Mango Stem Borer

Dear Santos,
The Mango Stem Borer is an Asian species that has recently been introduced to Puerto Rico.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston, Texas
Date: 05/31/2018
Time: 03:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this guy in my kitchen late at night and I can’t find it on google. It’s driving me INSANE please help!
How you want your letter signed:  Tiffany

Longicorn:  Enaphalodes taeniatus

Dear Tiffany,
We are still working on a species identity for you, but we can tell you this is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and it reminds us of a Flat-Faced Longhorn in the subfamily Lamiinae, which is well represented on BugGuide.  The piebald pattern on your beetle is quite distinctive.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide some assistance.

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash with a link to BugGuide, we agree that this is an Oak Borer, Enaphalodes taeniatus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Ruidoso, NM
Date: 05/31/2018
Time: 05:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Spotted this huge bug at a garden center. It was just hanging out in the porch column. What is it??
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy

Ponderous Borer

Hi,
After a bit of research, I’m thinking that it may be a Ponderosa Pine Borer Beetle. We live in a Ponderosa/Pinon/Juniper forest. What do you think?
Thanks,
Cindy Adams

Dear Cindy,
We agree that this does appear to be a Ponderous Borer which is pictured on BugGuide, but we would not entirely rule out that it might be a different species of Prionid from the subfamily Prioninae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Garden bug
Geographic location of the bug:  United Kingdom (burton on trent)
Date: 05/30/2018
Time: 04:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify this bug as it is troubling my children
How you want your letter signed:  Joe smith

Cockchafer

Dear Joe,
This Cockchafer is a relatively common Scarab Beetle found in the UK and other parts of Europe. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination