Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Beetle with bushy looking legs: definitely can fly.
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern CA – Sunnyvale.
Date: 08/21/2018
Time: 09:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was hanging out in my compost bin with friends.  My guess is that they were grubs and just emerged.  Are they Japanese Beetles?
Thx
How you want your letter signed:  Chuck

Figeater with Phoretic Mites

Dear Chuck,
Your beetle is a Figeater, a Green June Beetle that is quite common in California.  The larvae, known as Crawlybacks, are often found in compost piles.  The “bushy looking legs” you mentioned are of great interest to us.  They look like phoretic Mites that often use large beetles like Sexton Beetles as transportation from location to location.  We have an image in our archives of some eastern Green June Beetles with phoretic Mites.

Thanks Daniel,
I can grab one of the beetles for you?  I closed the lid and they are still there.  I usually turn the pile over quite often but have been away for travel: when I opened the lid, those guys were hanging out.
Thanks again.
Chuck

Thanks for the offer Chuck, but we have plenty of Figeaters in Southern California.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please help identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Newport Oregon USA
Date: 08/19/2018
Time: 01:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Its hard to see in the picture, but its head is fuzzy and its antennae appear to be segmented.  I searched tirelessly on the internet to indentify this guy but couldnt figure out if its a cockroach, beetle, or wasp.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you for your help, Ayla.

Lion Beetle

Dear Ayla,
The Lion Beetle,
Ulochaetes leoninus, looks much more like a bee than it resembles other members of the Long Horned Borer Beetle family Cerambycidae.

Lion Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Small black beetles  with jewel colors of blue and violet
Geographic location of the bug:  Little Belt mountains Montana
Date: 08/20/2018
Time: 11:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen these in the months of June and July on blooming mountain lupines in the Little Belt and the Castle Mountains. I would like to know what kind of beetle these are?
How you want your letter signed:  David C Powers

Leaf Beetles, we believe

Dear David,
The image of a solitary beetle on a blossom is definitely a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  The other image showing an aggregation of Beetles appears to be a different species.  Can you clarify any information on these two images, especially the group of beetles.  Were they found aggregating as the image depicts?  Here is a BugGuide image of 
Linsleya sphaericollis that resembles the Blister Beetle in your image of a solitary individual, but again, we cannot verify the species.

Leaf Beetles

Hi, thank you for the quick response.  The aggregation of beetles I thought was the same, as the solitary beetle. But on closer inspection, I see differences in body shape. The plant is not mountain lupine. I realized I had grabbed two images taken at different places. The group is later in the summer.  Each beetle isn’t very big. Maybe 3/8 to 1/2 inch. I am looking at the plant they are eating it isn’t milkweed or dogbane.  Here are more photos. They are part of the group. I isolated out a few of the beetles. They are mostly in focus. The photo was taken in July or August in Montana in the mountains.
Cheers

David

Leaf Beetles

Dear David,
Your newly submitted images appear to be the same beetles that were in your original aggregation image, and we believe they are Leaf Beetles, possibly Flea Beetles from the genus
Altica like the ones in this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Small black beetles  with jewel colors of blue and violet
Geographic location of the bug:  Little Belt mountains Montana
Date: 08/20/2018
Time: 11:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen these in the months of June and July on blooming mountain lupines in the Little Belt and the Castle Mountains. I would like to know what kind of beetle these are?
How you want your letter signed:  David C Powers

Blister Beetle

Dear David,
The image of a solitary beetle on a blossom is definitely a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  The other image showing an aggregation of Beetles appears to be a different species.  Can you clarify any information on these two images, especially the group of beetles.  Were they found aggregating as the image depicts?  Here is a BugGuide image of 
Linsleya sphaericollis that resembles the Blister Beetle in your image of a solitary individual, but again, we cannot verify the species.

Aggregation of Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey, USA
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 09:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just something ive never seen before
How you want your letter signed:  Brian

Locust Borer

Dear Brian,
This striking Locust Borer is an excellent Yellowjacket mimic.  According to BugGuide:  “Considered a serious pest of Black Locust; previously weakened or damaged trees are often killed by the larvae. Previously confined to the native range of Black Locust in the northeast, it has spread with the trees throughout the US and parts of Canada. Black Locust is used for reclamation and similar projects where trees are likely to be stressed and thus more vulnerable to damage.”  Adult Locust Borers are often found feeding on Goldenrod.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Midlothian, Virginia, USA
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 11:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what this bug is ? It is about 1.5” long, black.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Dennis Shand

Tile Horned Prionus

Dear Dennis,
This is an impressive Tile Horned Prionus,
Prionus imbricornis, and according to BugGuide:  “Huge longhorn, dark brown and shining. Antennae have 18-20 overlapping segments (male).  Female has 16-18 serrated segments. Other eastern Prionus have 12-13 antennal segments.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination