Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange Flyer Dances into my Curiosity
Geographic location of the bug:  Gloucester, Va
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 07:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This odd creature flew into my phone, bounced off & landed in front of me. It then proceeds to waggle it’s purplish wings & tasseled abdomen at me before retracting it’s wings (somewhere!) Only to produce them once again & promptly take off. It’s a hot and steamy August here in Virginia. I’ve been a keen observer of nature all of my life & can honestly say, this one has stumped me completely. Hope you guys can help me out!
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks a bunch! Holly G

Rove Beetle

Dear Holly,
You have good reason for being stumped.  This is a Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, and many members of the family look very different from the “typical” beetle.  Unfortunately, BugGuide is currently experiencing technical difficulty and we cannot search for the species, but luckily, we were able to identify it as 
Platydracus maculosus in Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans where it states it is:  “the largest rove beetle in North America.”  The image with its abdomen curled up is a typical threat posture for many Rove Beetles.

Rove Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what’s this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  West Coast South Africa
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 09:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So I found this insect outside my home, I’ve never seen anything like it. I hope you can let me know what type of insect it is so I can do more research about it. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  L.S.

Brush Jewel Beetle

Dear L.S.,
This is a Jewel Beetle in the genus
Julodis, and we believe it is the Brush Jewel Beetle, Julodis hirsuta subsp. hirsuta.  The species is pictured on iNaturalist, but there is no information about the beetle.  Many species in the genus are pictured on Virtual Beetle, and we would not entirely rule out that your individual might be Julodis cirrosa or Julodis mira syn. sulcicollis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  probably cicadomorpha
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix, Arizona.
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 07:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug in the evening on a dead tree while grilling, it was origanoly above the stick but when I moved my camera closer to it it moved below. The next day I looked on the tree and I did not find it on the branch that it was sitting on before or any of those around it. I searched for it on google for at least an hour but found nothing quite like it.
How you want your letter signed:  christopher walker

Jewel Beetle: Acmaeodera gibbula

Dear Christopher,
This is a Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and upon researching its identity, we found this similar looking individual identified as 
Acmaeodera rubronotata on Texas A&M Agrilife Extension, but the red markings are different as are the white spotting pattern.  We suspected the genus was correct, but not the species.  We browsed BugGuide, but we still could not identify the species and we were daunted by the information “144 spp. in 2 subgenera in our area.”  We believe we correctly identified your beetle as Acmaeodera gibbula thanks to Arizona Naturalists.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae mostly host on various legumes.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Brown and orange beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Pearland tx
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 09:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this cool bug on the window but can’t figure out what it is. Can you help?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Sarah

Longjawed Longhorn

Dear Sarah,
This beautiful beetle is a Longjawed Longhorn,
Trachyderes mandibularis, and according to BugGuide:  “Hosts: Citrus, Parkinsonia, Salix, Celtis (Hovore et al. 1987).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetles Matting
Geographic location of the bug:peter Laugheed Park, Alberta, Canada
Date: 08/11/2019
Time: 12:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found these bettles matting on Foxtail Barley along lake shore. Currious as to what they are.
How you want your letter signed:  Larry Halverson

Mating Red Turnip Beetles

Dear Larry,
Because we quickly recognized these as Leaf Beetles in the family Chrysomelidae, we were able to identify them as mating Red Turnip Beetles,
Entomoscelis americana, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “occasional pest of canola, rapeseed and mustard in the northern Great Plains; may also damage other crucifer crops (turnips, cabbage). Larvae and adults feed on plants at night.”

Mating Red Turnip Beetles

Thanks for your quick responce. Very interesting – Will let my son-in-law (a canola farmer) know about these as he saw them too although his farm is hunders of miles away
larry
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant something in garage
Geographic location of the bug:  North East Utah
Date: 08/08/2019
Time: 11:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this thing in my garage. We have an inground pool and do leave outdoor lights on at night.
Should I be scared or should I fryM up?
How you want your letter signed:  Bug Master

Male Root Borer

Dear Bug Master,
This is a Root Borer in the genus
Prionus, and we strongly suspect it is a California Root Borer, Prionus californicus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Despite its name, the California Root Borer’s range includes much of western North America.  We would not rule out that it might be Prionus heroicus, which is also reported from Utah on BugGuide.  Either way, those impressive antennae indicate this is a male Root Borer.  Root Borers have powerful mandibles, so they should be handled with caution, but they are not considered dangerous.  Many species are attracted to lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination