Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looking to identify beetle
Location: Alongside Canyon in Spring Valley -San Diego California
February 5, 2014 9:47 pm
Hello and thank you in advance for your assistance in identifying this beetle.
Found in seasoned Eucalyptus logs that we were cutting for firewood. A dozen or so Beetles and larva.
Signature: Linda Diaz De Leon

Eucalyptus Borer

Eucalyptus Borer

Hi Linda,
Both the adult beetle and the larva are Eucalyptus Borers in the genus
Phoracantha.  There are two similar looking species, and we are unable to tell one from the other.  Eucalyptus Borers are native to Australia, but they have been introduced to North America and they are relatively common in California due to the ubiquity of the Eucalyptus host trees.  In an effort to keep populations of Eucalyptus Borers from spreading, people should not transport firewood far from the source of the growing trees.  You can find an image of the larva on Forestry Images.

Larva of a Eucalyptus Borer

Larva of a Eucalyptus Borer

Thank you very much for your time expertise.
Linda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification of red insect
Location: Alabama
February 6, 2014 1:42 pm
Neighbor found this insect on her patio. What looks like honeycomb is actually a doormat. To me, it looks like a Lepidoptera (moth) but I can’t see enough of the head to make out the antenna form. Also can’t see the wings on the metathorax. I would appreciate any help or suggestions that you can give me. In the meantime, I will continue to research the internet. Thank you.
Signature: Don

Net Winged Beetle

Net Winged Beetle

Thank you for your prompt response. I continued looking and I now believe that it is a Net Winged beetle. If I had been able to see the head, the antennae would have pointed me to the Coleoptera rather than the Lepidoptera.
“Net-winged beetles (family Lycidae), any of some 2,800 species of soft-bodied, brightly coloured, predominately tropical beetles (insect order Coleoptera) whose wing covers, or elytra, are broader at the tip than at the base and are characterized by a raised network of lines, or veins. The adults feed either on plant juices or on other insects and can easily be seen as they fly slowly between plants or crawl on flowers . The bold colouring of orange and black or blue probably warns predators of their acidic, burning taste. Larvae feed on wet rotting wood and are often found in high numbers.”
Don

Hi Don,
We apologize for the delay.  For some reason, there was a glitch in our email delivery and submissions were being delayed several days.  We agree that this is a Net Winged Beetle in the genus
Dictyoptera, and it is most likely the Golden Net Wing, Dictyoptera aurora.  Of the four species listed on BugGuide, only two are reported from Alabama, including the Golden Net Winged Beetle.  The other, Dictyoptera munda, is represented by a single mounted specimen on BugGuide, but the thorax lacks the dark markings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles on Loofah flowers
Location: Kedah, Malaysia
February 5, 2014 2:49 am
I found these two insects on yellow loofah flowers. I am not sure if the two are related (e.g. male/female). Both are small, body is about 1 cm long.
The brown and orange one have leaf-footed like feature.
Weather : Hot and humid
Climate : Tropical
Signature: Cohlinn

Weevil and Immature Citron Bug

Gold Dust Weevil and Immature Citron Bug

Hi again Cohlinn,
The yellow insect with what we believe is an immature Citron Bug is a Weevil, one of a group of beetles in the superfamily Curculionoidea.  At first we did have not had any luck identifying the species despite locating two matching images online.  There is an unidentified Weevil posted to The Flying Kiwi’s Cambodian Bugs page (scroll down to see it), and another image of an individual taken in Malaysia posted to FlickR.  Another unidentified individual is pictured on Interesting PHotos.  We then located some images on Project Noah that are identified as Gold Dust Weevils,
Hypomeces squamosus.  An individual from China is pictured on SinoBug.  Finally, a mating pair is pictured on PBase.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Salt Marsh Beetle
Location: San Diego County (San Elijo Lagoon)
February 4, 2014 6:04 pm
Dear Bugman,
I was exploring a spartina dominated salt marsh in southern California and found this little guy tucked within rolled up leaves of dead spartina plants. I was hoping you could help provide me some information on these guys.
Thank you!
Sincerely,
Signature: Shelby Rinehart

Ground Beetle

Beetle

Hi Shelby,
Your photos are quite excellent.  Thanks for showing so many views.  This looks like a Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae to us.  We will check with Eric Eaton so see if he agrees before we pursue trying to identify the species.  How large was this individual?

Beetle

Beetle

I don’t have the specimen in front of me, but if I recall it was less than 5mm in length.

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
This looks more like something in the Anthicidae (Antlike Flower Beetles) to me.  Nice series of images considering how small the subject is.
Eric

Ed. Note:  See BugGuide for more information on Antlike Flower Beetles.

Beetle

Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: aussietrev tiny longicorn
Location: Queensland, Australia
February 3, 2014 9:17 pm
Hi guys,
Just came across this tiny guy, around 5/16″, while taking photos of a strange object (that I will send in another enquiry) on my cucumber vine. This guy was perched on a passionfruit leaf and it seems he might have been looking for a girlfriend. I think it is probably the Small Acacia Longicorn or a close relative, this guy seems to have much hairier antennae than those pictured on Brisbane Insects site.
http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_longicorns/SmallAcaciaLongicorn.htm
Signature: aussietrev

Longicorn

Small Acacia Longicorn

Hi Trevor,
The markings on the elytra or wing covers of your individual are not as pronounced as either of the Small Acacia Longicorn species in the genus
Ancita in the tribe Ancitini that are pictured on the Brisbane Insect Website.  We wonder if you have yet a different species in the same genus, or perhaps in an entirely different genus.  It has long been the bane of the taxonomist that there is so much variation within some species that it is quite common to have different individuals from different locations identified as different species.  Sadly, we do not have the entomological skills necessary to make an exact species identification here.  According to BushCraftOz there is  “some variation.”  There are also some photos on Insects of Tasmania.

Small Acacia Longicorn

Small Acacia Longicorn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue Bug
Location: Not sure
January 30, 2014 1:13 am
Hi there,
We import a dry dog food from Midwest US and with the last few containers we had a blue bug in the container. The container is transported via the Panama Canal from Pennsylvania – we wonder if it could have some from there.
I am sorry but my photos are not that good.. but here we go..
Image 1: dead, but you can see the legs
Image 2: dead, but you can get an idea of the size
Image 3: there are about 5-6 live ones in the bag with the dog food
Your help will be much appreciated
Signature: Not sure

Red Legged Ham Beetle

Red Legged Ham Beetle

Our Robo-response
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Red Legged Ham Beetle

Red Legged Ham Beetle

Hi there,
How will I know if you don’t have time to reply?
Thanks,
Malene

Red Legged Ham Beetles in Dog Food!!!

Red Legged Ham Beetles in Dog Food!!!

Dear Malene,
Thank you for your patience.  It appears you have an infestation of Red Legged Ham Beetles,
Necrobius rufipes.  Even though the photo is blurry, the red legs are very obvious in your second image.  According to Forensics Topics, a high profile occupation thanks to all the crime scene investigation shows on television:  “This beetle is small in size with a bluish/green metallic body. Notice the red leggs-hence [sic] the name. This beetle shows up during dryer stages of decomposition.”  We suspect that there are also larvae in the dog food.  According to BugGuide:  “found on dried fish, skins and bones of dead animals, and other carrion; also found on museum specimens” and “Eggs are laid on the food material; larvae pass through three or four instars; the last instar spins a cocoon in which pupation occurs; life-cycle takes 6 weeks or longer depending on food type and physical conditions. Under optimum conditions, the rate of population increase is about 25 times per month. The adults fly actively and can thus easily disperse to new sources of food.”

Thank you so much Daniel. Much appreciated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination