Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug in the trunk
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Ana, CA
Date: 08/23/2019
Time: 11:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was hanging out inside my trunk. I used a twig to detach it, but it was holding on with super strength.
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Michika

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Mike,
This is an invasive Diaprepes Root Weevil,
Diaprepes abbreviatus, and according to the Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program:  “The diaprepes root weevil damages both the leaves and the roots of plants. The adult weevils damage leaves by chewing semi-circular areas out of the leaf margin. There may also be frass or weevil droppings near the areas that have been fed upon. The grub-like larva feeds on the roots of a plant, weakening or killing a plant.”  According to the Center for Invasive Species Research:  “This pest has a very wide host range, attacking more than 270 species of plants in 59 plant families.  In Florida citrus groves, Diaprepes root damage allows, Phytophthora, a very serious and often lethal plant pathogen to invade roots further hastening the decline of trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  who is he little monster
Geographic location of the bug:  Araraquara-São Paulo, Brazil
Date: 08/19/2019
Time: 09:51 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I would like to identify these beetles, they were very big sizes about 10+ centimeters. People here are afraid of them and call them “big cockroach”.
Nearby there are eucalyptus trees and lots of sugar cane.
I would like to know if they are rare, because these photos are from November 2018 and since then I have not seen any more here (the first beetle is slightly smaller than the second).
The first question is: are they dangerous?
What is his life time? what does he feed on? and how is his larval state?
How you want your letter signed:  Kainã

Root Borer

Dear Kainã,
This is one of the Root Borers in the subfamily Prioninae, and it looks similar to
Ctenoscelis ater which is pictured on Coleoptera Neotropical, but there is no information on the site regarding this beetle’s life cycle.  There is an image but no information on Prioninae of the World.  There is one sighting on iNaturalist.

Root Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma City, OK
Date: 08/19/2019
Time: 12:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this beetle? Found it in my house. Wondering if this is what killed one of my trees! Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Oklahoma Beetle

Ocellated Tiger Beetle

This harmless, predatory Tiger Beetle did not kill your tree.  We believe we have correctly identified it as an Ocellated Tiger Beetle thanks to this Gossamer Tapestry image and this BugGuide image.  We will be tagging this submission as Unnecessary Carnage in an effort to educate the public that every insect encountered is not a threat.

Cara on Facebook Asks:  Why do people kill first, then ask questions?!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big?
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey, USA
Date: 08/17/2019
Time: 03:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello daughter rescued this guy from our pool. He scurried away, was very fast. Looked to have front legs but back end more worm like
How you want your letter signed:  Cher Mom

Ground Beetle Larva

Dear Cher Mom,
Immature insects often present greater identification challenges than adult insects present.  We suspected this to be a Ground Beetle larva and we found supporting visual validation on Project Noah which has a similar looking image identified as a Pterostichini sp. and on BugGuide where a similar image is identified as a
Pasimachus species.   Ground Beetles are predators as larvae and adults and Caterpillars are often a preferred prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange Flyer Dances into my Curiosity
Geographic location of the bug:  Gloucester, Va
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 07:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This odd creature flew into my phone, bounced off & landed in front of me. It then proceeds to waggle it’s purplish wings & tasseled abdomen at me before retracting it’s wings (somewhere!) Only to produce them once again & promptly take off. It’s a hot and steamy August here in Virginia. I’ve been a keen observer of nature all of my life & can honestly say, this one has stumped me completely. Hope you guys can help me out!
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks a bunch! Holly G

Rove Beetle

Dear Holly,
You have good reason for being stumped.  This is a Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, and many members of the family look very different from the “typical” beetle.  Unfortunately, BugGuide is currently experiencing technical difficulty and we cannot search for the species, but luckily, we were able to identify it as 
Platydracus maculosus in Beetles of Eastern North America by Arthur V. Evans where it states it is:  “the largest rove beetle in North America.”  The image with its abdomen curled up is a typical threat posture for many Rove Beetles.

Rove Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what’s this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  West Coast South Africa
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 09:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So I found this insect outside my home, I’ve never seen anything like it. I hope you can let me know what type of insect it is so I can do more research about it. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  L.S.

Brush Jewel Beetle

Dear L.S.,
This is a Jewel Beetle in the genus
Julodis, and we believe it is the Brush Jewel Beetle, Julodis hirsuta subsp. hirsuta.  The species is pictured on iNaturalist, but there is no information about the beetle.  Many species in the genus are pictured on Virtual Beetle, and we would not entirely rule out that your individual might be Julodis cirrosa or Julodis mira syn. sulcicollis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination