Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: never seen it before..
Location: Bad Dürkheim, Rhineland Palatinate, Germany
March 9, 2014 3:40 pm
hey bugman!
I am from Germany, exactly from Rhineland Palatinate.
So I opend the trunk of my car yesterday and a huge bug just lay there.. It tried to cover up, I guess.
It was already dead when I found it.
I have never seen something like this! Really big and colour was golden and green, it also got huge eyes.
It would be awesome if you know what kind of bug it is!
thank you!
Sarah
Signature: Sarah

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Hi Sarah,
This is an aquatic beetle, most likely a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the family Dytiscidae.  Like many aquatic insects, Predaceous Diving Beetles are capable of flying from one body of water to another.  Your individual bears a resemblance to
Cybister laterimarginalis, a European species that is pictured on the Polish website Iconographia Coleopterorum Poloniae and on Wikimedia Commons

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Predaceous Diving Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle from Patagonian rain forest
Location: Cahuelmó, Parque Pumalín, Patagonia, Chile
March 8, 2014 3:06 pm
This very large beetle was found in temperate rain forest at Cahuelmó in the northern part of Parque Pumalín. Can you help putting a name on this species? We were told it’s supposed to be endangered, is that true?
Signature: Henriette

Chilean Stag Beetle

Chilean Stag Beetle

Dear Henriette,
We are so thrilled to have received your identification request and this excellent photo.  We couldn’t imagine it to be anything other than a major male Stag Beetle in the family Lucanidae.  We quickly located your Stag Beetle on Community Idea Stations where it is identified as
Chiasognathus granti Stephens, the Chilean Stag Beetle or Darwin’s Stag Beetle.  The site includes an NPR interview with Dr. Art Evans who states that this is the only species in the genus that stridulates, and that Charles Darwin, in the Descent of Man, described the male’s use of his impressive mandibles to fight other males and defend females.  The Generic Guide to New World Stag Beetles has a map with its very limited range in Patagonia.

Thank you very much for the identification! I saw the Darwin’s Stag Beetle on jan 10th this year, but unfortunately the ranger, who found the beetle, killed the bug to bring it home with him (he was a forestry student). I hope there are stille lots of them in the vast Patagonian rain forests…
Best regards,
Henriette
Mvh Henriette

Dear Henriette,
We don’t want to imagine the worst, but we hope the ranger isn’t using his job to deal in the global insect trade.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unsual Bug
Location: Coastal San Diego
March 8, 2014 9:33 am
Dear Mr. Bug Man,
What kind of bug is this? It was found meandering across my mattress at approximately 8am PST this morning. It is very small, perhaps 1/8″ of an inch. I told my girlfriend it came from her and I wanted her tested. We are now broken up. I need your help to get her back.
PS. I didn’t kill it even though I wanted to. It did no good. She’s still really mad at me.
Signature: BrokenupbyBug

Carpet Beetle blamed for relationship demise

Carpet Beetle blamed for relationship demise

Dear BrokenupbyBug,
We can understand your girlfriend’s reaction.  No girl wants to be told she has bugs.  This Varied Carpet Beetle is a common household pest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I know its not a ladybug, but what is it?
Location: Norman, OK
March 6, 2014 3:27 pm
hopefully you can figure this out, I’ve had troubles identifying it. thank you! it is much larger than a ladybug and doesn’t have the same type of head and the antennae don’t seem remotely familiar… spots AND stripes? or would they be more like squares? lol
Signature: Lox

Swamp Milkweed Beetle

Swamp Milkweed Beetle

Dear Lox,
This sure looks like a Swamp Milkweed Beetle,
Labidomera clivicollis.  The black spotting pattern of the Swamp Milkweed Beetle is highly variable, and some individuals have more black than others.  BugGuide notes:  “Part of the orange and black milkweed mimicry complex, which includes Monarch Butterfly, Red Milkweed Beetle, milkweed bugs, and at least one assassin bug.   Larvae and adults of this species cut several side-veins of a milkweed leaf prior to feeding, to reduce the sticky latex that would otherwise be produced at their feeding sites. “

Yay! thank you so much!! I do believe you are correct, I would’ve never figured it out, as I’m not exactly knowledgeable about insects. It does make sense tho, because there where it was heading was a bunch of milkweed all around some rosebushes! now I feel better lol!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny black bugs under bed
Location: Sydney, Australia
February 22, 2014 11:59 pm
We have found lots of tiny black bugs under our bed, they crawl around the floor and sometimes crawl into the crack between the floor and skirting board. They are about as big as ants. They sometimes crawl into the chipboard at the back of our bedside tables. They do not jump or bite us, only crawl. They look black but when you look closer they are dark brown.
Signature: Sarah

Powder Post Beetles

Powder Post Beetles

Dear Sarah,
We believe you have Powder Post Beetles in the subfamily Lyctinae.  According to BugGuide:  “powder-post beetles refer to the propensity of the larvae to reduce sapwood into a powdery frass.”
  BugGuide also notes several other items of interest, including the range of Powder Post Beetles being “worldwide (easily spread with commerce), more diverse in the tropics” and regarding food, that the “larva feeds mainly on the sapwood of hardwoods; species are polyphagous.”  Perhaps the most significant bit of information for you is that “The destructiveness of lyctid beetles to wood and wood products is second only to that of termites.”  If this is a new bed, it is possible that the wood was infested with Powder Post Beetle larvae which emerged in the new location.  Catseye Pest Control provides this information:  “Adult Powder Post Beetles range from a 1/8th of an inch to 1/4th of an inch in size and larvae are usually less than a 1/4th of an inch long. When fully matured, Powder Post Beetles slender and flattened in shape with short antennae and are reddish brown to black in color. The larvae, which are left behind in the cracks of the wood by the adults, are cream colored and slightly C-shaped.  The long, narrow, flat bodies of the mature adults allow them to easily bore into wood surfaces, the first place to look during powder post beetle control procedures. They prefer the sapwood of hardwoods, especially oak, hickory and ash and creates small, round holes. Common household places to find these holes are in hardwood floors, furniture, molding and fixtures. These pinhole openings are a tell tale sign of an infestation. Powder Post Beetles lay their eggs in cracks of wood and the larvae tunnel into the surface filling it with a very fine powder-like dust, hence the name Powder Post Beetles.”

Powder Post Beetles

Powder Post Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Prehistoric Snout Creature
Location: Guapimirim, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
March 2, 2014 9:23 am
Dear Bugman,
During our recent visit to the Atlantic Rainforests of Brazil we encountered many strange visitors in our poussada near the Serra dos Orgaos National Park in Teresopolis.
This particular one was allso known by our host Leandro, though not by name …
Roughly about 5 cm size. Not very agile and completely silent.
Signature: Lickafoot

Tropical Weevil

Tropical Weevil

Dear Lickafoot,
This beetle is classified as a Weevil, and it looks very similar to a Tropical Weevil,
Brentus anchorago, sometimes found in southern Florida that we have posted several times to our site.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “widespread in neotropics: Mexico, West Indies, South America. In North America, found only in southernmost Florida.”  There is a photo of Brentus anchorago on our sister site from Brazil, Insetologia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination