Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small brown white carpet bug
Location: Austin, TX
March 11, 2014 7:23 pm
We found lots these bugs on our rug next to kitchen tile. At first we thought it was mouse dropings but eventually we realize they were alive. I have provide two magnified pictures. One picture is the top view and the other is the bottom view. The top view of the bug appears to show wings ont he tail section, how I have not observed these bugs in flight. We live in Austin Texas and the weather was in the 20 deg F a few weeks ago. Please identify and recommend way to control.
Thank you.
Signature: Allen

Varied Carpet Beetle

Varied Carpet Beetle

Hi Allen,
This is a Varied Carpet Beetle, a common and cosmopolitan household pest.
  We get numerous identification requests daily for Varied Carpet Beetles, so we are posting your images in the hope that it will help some folks who are currently being troubled by Varied Carpet Beetles.

Varied Carpet Beetle

Varied Carpet Beetle

Thanks Daniel…
I appreciate your quick feedback.
–Allen

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Weevil From Malaysia
Location: Malaysia
March 13, 2014 8:20 am
Hi, this is a weird weevil that i found on the dead tree in my backyard. This weevil has a weird eyes. Can you ID it for me?
Signature: Lanzz

Weevil

Weevil

Hi Lanzz,
We found a matching image of your Weevil on Some Wonderful Weevils of Malaysia and on FlickR, but it is not identified.  At this time, we are unable to provide any conclusive identification.

Weevil

Weevil

Update:  January 25, 2016
We just received a comment that FlickR now has an update with the genus on the posting we cited.  Additionally, there are good images on PaDIL, an Australian Biosecurity and Biodiversity site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small beetle needs identifying
Location: Midlands, UK
March 13, 2014 5:24 am
Hi,
I founf several of these small beetles in a wheat field in the UK. They have light bodies, ridged/bumpy elytra and a dark head. I can’t seem to identify it though. Do you know what species it is?
Signature: H Watkins

Unknown Beetles

Possibly Water Scavenger Beetles

Dear H Watkins,
We don’t recognize your beetles, which means we must research.  Preparing questions and images for posting takes time, and our time this morning is running short, so we are posting your images and we hope to attempt an identification as well this morning, but we may not be able to provide you with a response immediately.

Unknown Beetles

Unknown Beetles

Eric Eaton provides a very interesting identification:  Water Scavenger Beetles
Daniel:
Two of us are thinking the beetles might be water scavenger beetles (family Hydrophilidae).  Not all of them are strictly aquatic as adults, and as Doug Yanega said:  Haven’t they had a lot of rain in the UK this year?  So, if the wheat fields were flooded, or even just “soggy,” it is a fair bet to say that is what the beetles are.
Eric

Another Update from Eric Eaton:  March 17, 2014
Ok, got a more specific reply from Michael Geiser:  “Yup, I would suspect Helophorus nubilus, a species with costate elytra, well-known from wheat fields in England (even reported as a “pest species”). But I’ll wait for Robert’s reply, as he’s the expert…”
So, yes, a water scavenger beetle!
Eric

Another Update from Eric Eaton:  March 22, 2014
Daniel:
Please meet Clive Turner, a coleopterist interested in the beetles, which turn out to be a different species (not Helophorus nubilus, but a different one).  I will let Clive fill you in…..
He is interested in obtaining the specimens if the person who wrote to WTB still has them.  Thanks!
Sincerely,
Eric

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Ladybug behavior (keeps walking in circles)
Location: Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico
March 11, 2014 4:45 pm
Hi Bugman,
A week ago from now, I found a ladybug in our backyard that could only walk in circles. It was in direct sunlight, just going round and round, so I decided to do something to prevent a likely death from dehydration, and brought it inside.
It’s been with me for the last 7 days, and I have been feeding it small insects when I can, and when I can’t, it seems to enjoy feeding on rice and sugar. I’ve also been keeping a wet Q-tip in its “cage”. But after 7 days, even when it seems to still be in good health, it is still going round and round, and hasn’t stopped.
Just yesterday, I noticed that it began to walk in straight segments for the first time, but each straight run would still always end up in turning back and completing a loop. It also will not fly, although sometimes it extends its wings a bit.
So, my question is not what kind of bug this is, but rather, why is it displaying such bizarre behavior. All of its legs are intact and move fluidly. Is it possible that it was just born crazy somehow? Was its nervous system damaged by a pesticide possibly? As far as I know, there are no pesticides in our backyard.
I found a video on youtube of another person who observed the exact same behavior:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiA1wZI1oSI
And here’s a video of my own ladybug the moment I found it:
http://www.2yr.net/VIDEO0089.mp4
This behavior is beyond my comprehension! It seems so purposeless and suicidal of it to behave like that…
Signature: Humberto

Ladybird Beetle

Ladybird Beetle

Dear Humberto,
We don’t know the answer to your question, but we will post your submission, feature it on our web page, and hope that someone writes in who can provide some information.  We pondered the possibility of some sort of parasite, and though we discovered there is a Wasp that parasitizes a Lady Beetle, turning it into a “zombie bodyguard”, the walking in circles behavior is not mentioned.  See Science Daily for an account of the wasp parasitization.

Update:  March 16, 2014
Hello,
Thank you so much for your kind response, Mr. Marlos! Here’s an update: The ladybug escaped a few days ago, but was recaptured about 12 hours later. I have recently discovered aphids in our rose plants, and brought a good few into the ladybug’s enclosure, where it has been feasting on them. It is still going in circles though. The first 4 days, the circles it was making were fairly uniform, but now they sometimes distend into straight segments. I have learned a lot about ladybugs just by observing this one. If she stops running in circles before her normal lifespan is over, I will be sure to let you know. I read the article you linked, which was fascinating, but I’m afraid I don’t know how to tell if this ladybug has ever been parasitized.
Thank you! I’m glad to hear I’ve reported on something that was unheard of (I wouldn’t want to send any trivial questions!).
Cheers!
-Humberto

Thanks for the update Humberto.  We look forward to any additional observations you might have.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar or bug?
Location: auckland- new zealand
March 9, 2014 6:57 pm
Hi There!
Just found a huge hoard of these new bugs on our zucchini plant leaves- only the leaves in the shade but covering the top and bottom of the leaves.
Its nearing the end of the summer here and the only other life to be found on the zucchini are bright yellow and black lady bugs.
the biggest of these bugs is about 1 cm long and the smallest is about 1 mm
Look forward to finding out what this is!!
Signature: Thanks

Fungus Eating Ladybird Larva

Fungus Eating Ladybird Larva

This is the larva of a beneficial Fungus Eating Ladybird Beetle, which will eventually transform into the “bright yellow and black Lady Bugs” you mentioned.  We quickly learned this information on the Aussie Organic Gardening page on powdery mildew on zucchini where the life stages of the Fungus Eating Ladybird are compared to the 26 Spot Ladybird which feeds on the leaves.  The Brisbane Insect website provided us with the scientific name Illeis galbula and the information:  “The Fungus-eating Ladybird larvae grow up to 8-10mm.  They are creamy white in colour with lines of black dots on their back. They are usually found feeding those black mold or fungus on leaves. The larvae runs very fast when disturbed. Larvae feed only on powdery mildew type of  fungus (Oidium sp., Erysiphales) which infecting various plants.”  We would love for you to send us photos of the adult Fungus Eating Ladybird as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Lisboa
March 10, 2014 8:08 am
Hello im from Lisboa, Portugal.
I found this Bug with more and less 3 cm. I know is a beetle but i dont now what specime it is ….sorry my english
Signature: Miguel Monteiro

Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil

Dear Miguel,
This is a Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, and it is an introduced species in Portugal where it is threatening the palm trees.  You can read more about the threat the Red Palm Weevil poses to palms in Portugal on Acción Ambiental.

Hello
I Aprecciate your answer.
Thank you very much
Kind regards
Miguel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination