Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Beetle
Location: Mansfield, Texas
May 2, 2015 4:48 pm
Can you help ID these guys? Two of the same beetle but different colors. One cream and the other orange. Pretty sure I brought them home on some Shasta Daisies I just bought. Are the y considered a pest or beneficial – Thanks so very much
Signature: Jeanine

Kern's Flower Scarabs

Kern’s Flower Scarabs

Dear Jeanine,
The two larger beetles in your image are variations in coloration of Kern’s Flower Scarabs or Plains Bumble Scarab,
Euphoria kernii, which we identified on BugGuide where you can also see these same color variations and where it is noted:  “This species is extremely variable in its color and pattern ranging from all black to nearly all yellow with all stages in between.”  We will also attempt to identify the smaller insect visible in your image.

Awesomeness! Thank you for the reply, I watched them through a macro lens for over an hour as they went from flower head to flower head. When one would go the other would follow. I have no idea what the little black and white stripped insect is either. Also the little brown dot to the left is also an insect, its head is down into the flower so you’re only seeing the bottom half. Further over onto the left petals I believe are a cluster of Thrips.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feather Horned Beetle
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
May 2, 2015 11:34 pm
My daughter found this beetle in our backyard. We did have a smaller beetle without the fancy antennae but by the time I got the camera the smaller beetle had disappeared.
We were able to identify it from your site and thought that you may be interested.
Signature: Chris McMillan

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Chris,
Your images of a Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, are an excellent addition to our archive.

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle?
Location: Western, NC United States
May 1, 2015 6:12 pm
Hello Bugman,
I found this guy in my cat’s bowl.
What is it?  I neglected  to mention  it is almost 2″ long.
Western, NC
May 2, 2015
Thanks so much,
I stopped killing spiders years ago because of you.
Signature: interested

Eyed Elater

Eyed Elater

Dear interested,
This magnificent beetle is an Eyed Elater,
Alaus oculatus, the largest North American Click Beetle.

Wow, thanks, that was fast.
My friend found one in her yard a few days ago. And we both wanted to know. We especially  wanted to know it it bites, felt pretty safe after seeing the picture of Jay holding one.
Thanks again,
you always come through.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp beetle in California?
Location: Petaluma, CA
May 1, 2015 3:13 pm
Founds this bug today,.
Petaluma, CA. Riparian / farm land
Hot and sunny.
Signature: Kati Jackson

Clytus planifrons

Clytus planifrons

Hi Kati,
Many species of Longhorned Borer Beetles from the family Cerambycidae are excellent wasp mimics, including members of the genus
Clytus.  We believe the individual represented in your images is Clytus planifrons based on its resemblance to individuals posted on BugGuide.  The species is found in California.  On the genus page, BugGuide states:  “C. arietis is called ‘wasp beetle’ in the U” which we suppose should have read “UK” because according to Nature Spot it is “Common and widespread in England and Wales, scarcer in Scotland.”  Had you not stated that your found your individual in California, we might have mistaken it for its Old World relative.

Clytus planifrons

Clytus planifrons

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs in Window
Location: Southwest Virginia
April 30, 2015 1:03 pm
I have these bugs around my kitchen window mostly, but they venture out sometimes. I clean them up 3 – 4 times a day. Every time I clean them, I get between 25 and 50 on my wet paper towel. They seem to have a relatively short life span. I would like to know what they are and if there is some type of natural deterrent .
Signature: Louis Goodbrod

Varied Carpet Beetle

Varied Carpet Beetle

Dear Louis,
You are being troubled by a common household pest, the Varied Carpet Beetle,
Anthrenus verbasci .  You may have encountered the larvae of the Varied Carpet Beetle as well.  The larvae will feed on a wide variety of organic materials in the home, and adult Carpet Beetles feed on pollen.  You are finding them in your windows because they are trying to get outside.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scarabs in Chicago?!
Location: Chicago, Illinois USA
April 26, 2015 7:28 pm
These grubs were inside of a dying silver maple. Found in the middle amongst wood pulp and poop. We live just north of the Windy City. I figured it was some kind of rhino or tricerotops beetle.
Signature: Jim Griesenauer

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Dear Jim,
We agree with your assessment that these Scarab Beetle Grubs are in the subfamily Dynastinae, the Rhinoceros Beetles.  In our opinion, they probably began feeding on the rotting portion of the dying tree because we do not believe that the grubs were responsible for the tree’s demise.  Thanks for including the images of the children because they provide a nice sense of scale for these large grubs.  We suspect that large Scarab grubs are considered edible by entomophages, so we will attempt to contact David Gracer (see Huffington Post Food Blog) for his opinion.

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs with Children for scale

Scarab Beetle Grubs with Children for scale

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination