Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bark-Gnawing Beetle?
Location: Delmar, MD
October 26, 2015 3:45 am
Could this be a Bark-Gnawing Beetle? Thanks…
Signature: G Robinson

Bark Gnawing Beetle

Bark Gnawing Beetle

Dear G,
You are absolutely correct that this is a Bark Gnawing Beetle in the genus
Temnoscheila as the images on BugGuide will verify.  BugGuide also notes:  “can inflict a painful bite if handled carelessly.” 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect on Apple Blossom
Location: Western Cape, South Africa
October 26, 2015 6:17 am
This insect has been spotted in Apple orchards during blossom period. Seems to spend quite a bit of time at the open flowers
Signature: Keith

Unknown Longicorn

Unknown Longicorn

Dear Keith,
This is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  We will attempt to determine the species for you when we have a moment.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: American Oil Beetle?
Location: Hamilton Ontario
October 24, 2015 9:41 pm
Hello Bugman,
I’ve got another find for you! I think this is an American Oil Beetle, but it seems a good deal larger than the description I read. This guy was hanging out inside our museum for a day or two before I rescued him. He looked dull black indoors but once I got him out in the sunshine I could see he had a beautiful greenish sheen on him. Didn’t know what his preferred host plant was, so I hope he found something to eat! (& a warm place to hide!)
Signature: Alison

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Alison,
We don’t mean to alarm you, but you should exercise caution when handling any of the Blister Beetles in the family Meloidae as members of the family secrete a compound called cantharidin that is known to cause blistering in human skin.  Regarding Oil Beetles in the genus
Meloe, according to the University of Connecticut Home & Garden Education Center page:  “The adults feed on grass and  several leafy weeds and flowers. ”  Though The Smaller Majority site has a fascinating overview of the life cycle of the Oil Beetle, nothing is mentioned about adult food preferences.

Yikes! Thanks for letting me know. I’m glad she was in a good enough mood that no one got hurt! Will exercise caution in the future when handling unknown insects. Thank you for your time!
Alison Innes

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Makaweli Poi, Hawaii
October 24, 2015 11:07 pm
Living in Hawaii.
This bug is seen on our Gliricidia since 15 Oct 2015.
Signature: Kavi

Kiawe Borers

Kiawe Borers

Dear Kavi,
Your name is remarkably similar to the name of your Longhorned Borer Beetles, commonly called the Kiawe Borer.  It is a non-native species that feeds on introduced, cultivated mesquite plant.  Since Gliricidia and Mesquite are in the same family, perhaps the Kiawe Borer has adapted to boring in the wood of the former.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cychrus?
Location: Studley, Virginia
October 24, 2015 2:50 pm
Hi Bugman! Seriously, I love this website!
I saw this beetle outside, and it immediately caught my eye, because it looked different than most black beetles I see.
I looked it up, and the closest I can find is that it looks like it might be in the genus Cychrus.
What do you guys think?
Love,
Signature: Allie

Small Snail Eating Beetle

Small Snail Eating Beetle

Dear Allie,
Thanks so much for your effervescent praise.  We believe you have correctly identified this Small Snail Eating Beetle to the Tribe level of Cychrini, but the genus
Cychrus, according to BugGuide, is found in the Pacific Northwest.  Based on this BugGuide image and others posted there, we believe your beetle is in the genus Sphaeroderus, and there are six species in the genus found in your area of the country, according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cerambycid I.D.
Location: Madera Canyon Road, Arizona
October 24, 2015 1:42 am
I found a number of these beautiful small cerambycids on Baccharis bushes on the side of the road going to Madera Canyon in Southern Arizona. Can you identify them for me? Thanks.
Signature: Bill King

Longhorn Beetles possibly mating

Longhorn Beetles possibly mating

Hi Bill,
Judging by the number of legs and antennae evident in your image, there appears to be another individual hidden, so you may have documented this lovely individual mating.  We found it pictured on FlickR and there it is identified as
Sphaenothecus bivittata.  According to Valerie’s Austin Bug Collection:  “The mate finding strategy of S. bivittata is rather flamboyant. Males position themselves on the highest tips of branches on flowering shrubs or small trees and keep lookout for females. Their long thin antennae wave in the wind. When females arrive, the males are quick to take action and they frequently mate while the females feed.”  According to BugGuide:  “Larval hosts: Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) and Roses (Rosa spp.)”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination