Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ground beetle
Location: Bomassa, Republic of Congo
November 11, 2015 11:56 pm
I live in northern Congo and regularly come across interesting insects, some of which are probably little known or unknown to science.
I try to identify many of the arthropods I see here via iNaturalist, but many can use a lot of extra help – always appreciated!
Feel free to contact me at: naftalihonig@gmail.com
Signature: Naftali

Unknown Ground Beetle

Craspedophorus Ground Beetle

Dear Naftali,
We agree that this is a Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae, but at this time we are unable to provide you with a more specific name.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment.

Via iNaturalist a good bet seems Craspedophorus sp.
There are many spp. though…

According to a published paper we found, that genus is from Australia and Asia, but in Google Books Taxonomy, Phylogeny, and Zoogeography of Beetles and Ants online, it indicates:  “The carabid genus Craspedophorus, with over a hunderd species distributed through tropical Africa, Madagascar, Asia, and Australia is notable partly because of its usual dorsal color pattern, which consists of four yellow or orange spots on a blackish elytral background.  The spots are normally at or near the lateral margins of the elytra, two on each elytron, and when they are extensive, the dark background has even been described as forming a cross.”  Colnect indicates one species is pictured on a stamp from Portuguese Guinea.  The first species pictured on Carabidae of the World , Craspedophorus abnormis, is reported from “Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Zambia,” but alas, there is no image.  We believe you have discovered the correct genus.

No way to undercover (or name?) the species? I am just near the trinational border Cameroon-Congo-CAR…on the Congo side.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: aussietrev Big Brown Beetle
Location: Nth Burnett region. Queensland
November 11, 2015 10:32 pm
Hi guys.
This big beetle got caught up in some hail netting after a storm and unfortunately the ants got to it before I found it. They had removed pretty well all its legs, antennae and had started on the body but it was still alive and trying to get free. I have no idea what group it might belong in, and I guess the missing bits are going to make it hard to ID but can you help?
P.S> Did you get the link I sent you to the review on Pacific Corrinnidae that I contributed to?
Signature: aussietrev

Prionid

Poinciana Longicorn

Hi Trevor,
This is a Prionid in the subfamily Prioninae of the family of Longicorns, Cerambycidae.  It looks like it might be
Agrianome spinicollis which is pictured on the Atlas of Living Australia where it is described as:  “Very large, elongate beetle with long antennae. Wing covers yellowish-brown. Thorax reddish-brown, edged with a row of pointed teeth. Head with a pair of stout jaws.”  Previous postings on our site indicate the common name Poinciana Longicorn.
We cannot recall posting a link.  Please resend the information so we can link to the review on Pacific Corrinnidae.

Thanks guys. That beetle must be quite the traveler as there are no Poinciana anywhere around here. Wonder if they use any other native as a host?
The link is to a pdf of a rather large work by Robert Raven from the University of Queensland reviewing Western Pacific Corrinidaes to which I contributed specimens and photographs. One of my pictures was used for the cover art so now you know someone that is a famous published nature photographer. 🙂 It won’t be much use to anyone except dedicated spider nuts as it is a very technical work rather than a general use type of thing.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z6zcivdts7x1r7m/Raven_2015_Corinnidae_Western%20Pacific.pdf?dl=0

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: USA Midwest
November 10, 2015 8:43 pm
My daughter (8yrs old) and I found this bug we live in the midwest near St Louis and the date is November 10th 2015 the weather has been in the mid sixties and we are just curious as to what this bug is? It is about one and a half inches long and about a half inch across any information would be appreciated.
Thanks
Signature: Darla

Big Headed Ground Beetle

Big Headed Ground Beetle

Dear Darla,
This interesting beetle is a Big Headed Ground Beetle,
Scarites subterraneus, and you can confirm our identification by matching your individual to this image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are generally found:  “Under stones, leaf litter, etc., in soil.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: some kind of beetle
Location: Laguna Paiva, Santa Fe, Argentina
November 10, 2015 2:20 am
Hi! i found this kind of beetle in my grandfather´s backyard, i was searching for like 2 hours now in bugGuide.net but i coldn’t find a perfect match yet, i think that it could be from the Meloidae or Oedemeridae families but i-m not sure… this photo was taken in Santa Fe, Argentina. thanks in advance!
Signature: Guille

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Guille,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and BugGuide will only be helpful with identifying North American species.  Your individual may be
Erythrochiton jucundum which we found on the Butterflies and Beetles of Argentina site as well as the Galeria de Especies Determinadas Cerambycinae site.  This is not an uncommon color pattern, and we would not rule out that it is a different species.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found a bunch of these together
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
November 6, 2015 6:30 pm
We found these bugs crawling on the floor of our son’s room. Many of them were dead, but there were plenty of live ones, too. They were mostly located in about a 2 square foot area.
Thank you,
Signature: Tom

Carpet Beetle Larvae

Carpet Beetle Larvae

Dear Tom,
You are being troubled by Variegated Carpet Beetle Larvae,
Anthrenus verbasci.   According to BugGuide, they feed on a:  “wide variety of materials of animal origin (wool, fur, skins…); stored food materials and products (biscuits, cakes, seeds, wheat, maize, oats, rice, cayenne pepper, cacao, and dried cheese); …  RemarksThe most abundant species in buildings; arguably, world’s most important pest of insect collections. Adults from indoor populations have a negative attraction to light, but near the end of their oviposition period they become attracted to light. Adults from outdoor populations show attraction to light. Adults are active fliers and often fly high above the ground. They enter houses through open windows, around eaves, soffits, and attic vents, and often lay eggs in the dead insects collecting in light fixtures.”  The large quantity of individuals in a confined location indicates there is a plentiful food supply.  Perhaps more vacuuming will help.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big beetle
Location: Baja California Sur
November 6, 2015 5:01 pm
Can you please tell me what this is? It landed in our backyard in San Jose del Cabo, Mexico.
Signature: Cheryl Connors

Click Beetle

Click Beetle

Dear Cheryl,
This is a Click Beetle in the family Elateridae, and it resembles
Ampedus sanguinipennis that is pictured on BugGuide.  We suspect it may be a member of the same genus.

Update:  Ruby Click Beetle
Thanks to a comment from coleopterist Dr. Arthur Evans, we now know that this is the Ruby Click Beetle,
Chalcolepidius rubripennis, a species depicted on Whole Sale Insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination