Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pleocoma blaisdelli -males
Location: Don Pedro Reservoir , Tuolomne County, California, US
November 5, 2015 10:53 am
I headed down to 49 and Don Pedro Reservoir 11/3/2015 ( during our first heavy soaker rains ) and set out a couple of my home made Plexiglas vein Black lite bucket traps just off a dirt road and waited . 56 degrees Rain. Finally the lord sent down more rain and at 5:00 am to 6:10 am a very nice series of males newly hatched , very sharp horned , and scratch free ! Very Shiny black elytra covers and golden brown Fur ! I believe these ” Rain Beetles ” to be males of ” Pleocoma blaisdelli Linsley 1938 ” , due to locality association , number of antennae segments, and Physical Description . The males lengths were exactly ( on metal calipers ) 20 mm to 28 mm long. 7 lamillie segments . I did not find or locate any females or their burrows .
… Gene St. Denis , Sierra Nevada Research , South Lake Tahoe , California
Signature: Gene St. Denis

Rain Beetles

Rain Beetles

Dear Gene,
We are positively thrilled to post your images of this Rain Beetle emergence.  From your information, it sounds like you went out on a Rain Beetle safari, and that you were quite successful.  The life history of Rain Beetles in the genus Pleocoma is quite fascinating, and we often marvel at the intricate complexity of the lives of certain insects, and we can’t help but to wonder how the immobility of the female Rain Beetle, who lives deep underground, enables the species to survive, but that also leads to the diversity in the genus and the location specificity of the different species.

Rain Beetles

Rain Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is it?
Location: Perth, Western Australia
November 1, 2015 9:17 pm
Hi! 🙂
My Son found this bug and I thought it had the cutest face! my first thought was a tick but on googling images of ticks I don’t think it is. can you please help identify it?
Signature: Belinda

Weevil

Weevil

Dear Belinda,
This is a Weevil, a member of the largest family of animals on earth.  You can find some examples of Australian Weevils on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colourful Bug
Location: Hornsby NSW
October 30, 2015 7:16 pm
I found this bug while pulling a weed out of a pot, at Hornsby NSW. I thought it might be a harlequin bug but the colour differs from the specimen shown on your website. Could you please identify the bug for me?
Signature: Mary

Fiddler Beetle

Fiddler Beetle

Dear Mary,
Each year as winter begins to descend on the northern hemisphere, we depend upon increased submissions from Australia and South Africa to supply us with daily posting material.  This gorgeous Scarab Beetle is called a Fiddler Beetle,
Eupoecila australasiae, because of the beautiful green pattern on its body.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Beautiful Creey Crawly
Location: Forest Lake, MN
November 1, 2015 8:33 pm
Hey, Dan! I hope this finds you and your family doing well!
I was at a friends house today and they were splitting old Red Oak for the winter. We came across this beauty, burrowed what looked like about 4 inches into the tree trunk. It’s about 2 inches long. I’m sorry I didn’t get a photo of it when it came out of the hole eventually. I thought I got enough photos but I guess not. Do you have any idea what it could be? I usually check your site before I ask, but I don’t know if it’s larvae, pupae, or what. We are all dying to find out! I feel bad that it’s probably now going to die, but perhaps an opossum with find a tasty meal.
Signature: carpwoman

Beetle Grub

Beetle Grub

Dear Carpwoman,
This is some species of Beetle Grub, and we followed up on our initial suspicion that this might be the larva of an Eyed Elater, and we believe we are correct.  Images on both BugGuide and Bug Eric confirm our suspicions.  According to Bug Eric:  “Larvae of all Alaus species live in decaying wood where they prey on the larvae and pupae of other kinds of beetles.  These ginat ‘wireworms’ have strong jaws and should be handled carefully, if at all.”  According to BugGuide:  ” larvae in decaying hardwood or pine wood, esp. in decaying roots.  Food Larvae feed on larvae and pupae of various insects, esp. beetles.”  The much more commonly encountered adult form of the Eyed Elater or Eyed Click Beetle is a large beetle with false eyespots.

Thank you for such a speedy response!  It’s nice to see this beautiful grub would have (hopefully still will) turned into such a cool beetle.
Joanne

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle ID
Location: Guatemala City
October 27, 2015 9:12 pm
Hello,
I found this beauty going up my bathroom wall tonight. A bit of research turned out the name polydrusus formosus.
Please confirm.
Thank you.
Signature: Jose

Leaf Beetle, we believe

Eumolpini Leaf Beetle

Dear Jose,
Despite the similarity in coloration, we do not believe this is a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus, nor any other species of Weevil.  In our opinion, the antennae look too different and we believe this is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  Compare the antennae on your individual to this image on BugGuide.  Look at the image of Colapsis sanjoseana on the Nash Turley website, but you have to scroll down, and upon cross checking that name, we found this FlickR image of an individual from Costa Rica.  The Early Birder website calls it the Eumolpini Leaf Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant’s
Location: Central North Island, New Zealand
October 26, 2015 8:20 pm
I found this in my garden today, its is about 4mm in body length and dark blue with these two yellow spots
Signature: Mike

Longhorn Beetle

Longhorn Beetle

Dear Mike,
Though it resembles an Ant, this is actually a Longhorn Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  Several years ago we posted an image of a mating pair that were identified as being in the genus
Zorion.  there are many nice images on the GrahamNZ website and there is also a nice image on FlickR

Thank you for the information.  I phoned someone who should have known and was told by him it was a flower bug
At least I know its basically harmless.  It will now go in the files with the spiney spiders found last year
Mike

Hi again Mike,
In defense of your source, we do have a comment on our previous posting indicating this is a Flower Longhorn, however our research, including a scholarly article on the Massey University of New Zealand site, has determined that it is in the subfamily Cerambycinae, not Lepturinae whose members are commonly called Flower Longhorns according to BugGuide.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination