Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Centepede/Millipede
Location: Jordan Lake/ Chapel Hill, NC
April 18, 2015 9:29 pm
Tonight I came across this photo from a couple of years ago. At the start of fall, I pulled a blanket out of a plastic storage container. When I opened it up this bug fell out. It was about 5 inches long. It’s beautiful but I didn’t dare touch it! I grabbed a container from the trash and scooped up the bug, took a quick pic and tossed it outside. I’ve been wondering what it was ever since!
Signature: Frightened of Beauty

Railroad Worm

Railroad Worm

Dear Frightened of Beauty,
This is a Railroad Worm, the larva of a Glowworm Beetle in the family Phengodidae and probably in the genus
Phengodes because of its similarity to this image posted on BugGuide.  As the name indicates, these larvae are bioluminescent, and had you had the opportunity to view this Railroad Worm in the dark, you would have been treated to a light show.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange beetle I can’t identify
Location: Missouri, United States
April 16, 2015 10:10 pm
I’ve searched and searched but I can’t seem to find a match to this beetle! I’m sure you all probably know what it is. I went out and captured one specifically for identification purposes for you, but I accidentally damaged part of the wings ;_; they’re very fast and I was using large tweezers to pick it up
Signature: Julian

False Bombardier Beetle

False Bombardier Beetle

Dear Julian,
Since this False Bombardier Beetle spends most of its life on the ground hunting for prey, the damaged elytra might not have a terribly detrimental effect on its survival.  You can read more about False Bombardier Beetles from the genus
 Galerita on BugGuide where it states:  “Adults eat other insects, especially caterpillars.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is that bug?
Location: Southern Ohio
April 17, 2015 5:52 pm
My daughter found a squished bug and wants to know what it’s called.
Thank you for your time
Signature: Leah’s Mom

Squished Tiger Beetle

Squished Tiger Beetle

Dear Leah’s Mom,
Leah found a Tiger Beetle, and in our opinion, living Tiger Beetles are much more beautiful than squished ones.  Many species of Tiger Beetles have beautiful metallic elytra.  Tiger Beetles are fast running predators that can also take to the air to avoid predators.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strangest bug I’ve ever seen
Location: Casablanca, Morocco
April 17, 2015 1:01 pm
Hi!
I was just wondering if anyone knew what this lovely looking insect was. It flew into my window then crawled up the wall.
Any help will be appreciated
Signature: Charlie

Devil's Coachhorse

Devil’s Coachhorse

Hi Charlie,
Though it does not look like a typical Beetle, this Rove Beetle in the genus
Ocypus is commonly called a Devil’s Coachhorse.  According to BugGuide, members of the genus are:  “native to the Old World (Eurasia & Africa), adventive in NA (2 spp. along the Pacific Coast + 2 in ne. US).”  The Devil’s Coachhorse is one of the few predators that will feed on snails, so they are welcome in our Los Angles garden where we occasionally encounter them.  TrekNature provides this information:  “Distribution: originally in great part of Europe and NW Africa, introduced to N America, Asia and Australia.” TrekNature also provides this interesting etomological information:  “English name: – devil’s coach-horse beetle comes from stories from the Middle Ages when this species has [b]een associated with Devil for the first time. Thanks to its black colouration, huge mandibles and night period of activity people believed that the Devil assumes the form of this beetle to eat sinners. Some other common names of this beetle are: Devil’s beast, Devil’s footman, Devil’s coachman and Devil’s steed.”  The Devil’s Coachhorse often strikes a threat posture when disturbed, and though it can release a foul odor (also associated with the devil), it is perfectly harmless to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: weird metallic beetle new mexico
Location: new mexico usa
April 16, 2015 12:23 pm
I been seeing these beetles all over my yard and in my tree wells
Signature: seraphim

Desert Spider Beetle

Desert Spider Beetle

Dear Seraphim,
Though it is commonly called a Desert Spider Beetle, this member of the genus
Cysteodemus is a Blister Beetle.  We believe it is most likely Cysteodemus wislizeni which is found in New Mexico and Texas according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle
Location: Pasadena MD
April 13, 2015 2:33 am
I found a species of beetle hiking across the kitchen counter and cannot identify. I walked it onto a paper towel and released outside but it did not seems to have the ability to fly.
Signature: Brian S

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Dear Brian,
We believe your Blister Beetle is
Lytta aenea, a species with no common name, based on this image posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination