Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
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Subject: What is this bug.
Location: Ontario, Canada
November 17, 2015 12:17 pm
We have found a couple of these in our house… wondering what it is
Signature: Krysten

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Dear Krysten,
We believe this is a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, but we are unable to find a visual match on BugGuide.  It somewhat resembles the Red Bellied Clerid,
Enoclerus nigripes rufiventris, pictured on Birding New Burnswick or Enoclerus sphegeus pictured on Bold Systems Taxonomy.  Heading back to BugGuide, we found the latter to be listed as the Red Bellied Clerid.  We will contact Eric Eaton to get his opinion.

Eric Eaton Confirms Checkered Beetle Identification
Hi, Daniel:
Yes, a checkered beetle in the genus Enoclerus.  Not sure of the species.  Jacques Rifkind is an expert on these but I forget how to get in touch with him.
Eric

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Subject: Beetle
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
November 18, 2015 6:36 am
This is a picture of a beetle we saw in Cape Town, South Africa. I searched for a picture to identify beetle but could not get one. I used to see the yellow and black one but never saw this one.
Signature: Pietman

White Spotted Fruit Chafer

White Spotted Fruit Chafer

Dear Pietman,
Commonly called a White Spotted Fruit Chafer,
Mausoleopsis amabilis, is a Scarab Beetle found in South Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Halloween Oil Beetle Orgy
Location: New Haven, CT
November 17, 2015 7:54 pm
This group of oil beetles was having a party in one corner of a lawn in a residential New Haven, Connecticut neighborhood on the morning of October 31. They were all within a one-foot square and there were none anywhere else around.
Thanks to all the hours I’ve spent on your site, I knew exactly what they were! I had never seen any in person before.
The cell phone photos came out pretty well so I thought I’d contribute them for your archives.
Signature: Tom

Mating Oil Beetles

Mating Oil Beetles

Dear Tom,
You images of mating Oil Beetles from the genus
Meloe are a wonderful addition to our archives. It would be curious to know what about the small area where you found them caused the Oil Beetles to congregate so amorously.  According to BugGuide:  “In males of some species mid-antennal segments are modified, and the c-shaped ‘kinks’ involving antennomeres V–VII are used to grasp female antennae during pre-mating displays.”  The individual featured alone in your one image has these modified antennae, hence is a male.

Male Oil Beetle

Male Oil Beetle

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Subject: Purple and Orange Scorpion-like Bug
Location: São Paulo / Brazil
November 15, 2015 6:03 pm
Found at the Pedra Grande State Park in the city of São Paulo, southeast Brazil in June 2014.
Signature: Guilherme Ramalho

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Guilherme,
Though we have not been successful at determining a species identity, we can tell you that this is a Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, and that it is the most brightly colored Rove Beetle we have ever seen, which makes it puzzling that we were not able to locate any matching images online.  We will contact Cesar Crash who edits our sister site in Brazil, Insetologia, to see if he can provide any additional information.  This pose is a typical threat position of Rove Beetles, and although they expel a foul odor, they are otherwise harmless.  The one exception to that are the Rove Beetles from the genus
Paederus, known as Creechie Bugs in Africa.  According to BugGuide:  “some species contain a toxic chemical (pederin) in their hemolymph which causes contact dermatitis in humans, usually as a result of slapping the beetle and crushing it against exposed skin. The affected area becomes red, swollen, and itchy, causing the skin to peel when scratched.”

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Cesar Crash writes back
Yes, I do! The beauty is in the genus Glenus, we have two on Insetologia:
http://www.insetologia.com.br/2014/11/besouro-estafilinideo-glenus-em-sao.html
http://www.insetologia.com.br/2015/10/besouro-estafilinideo-glenus-em-minas.html
and I guess G. biplagiatus http://www.me.esalq.usp.br/fotos/Coleoptera/Staphilinidae/1728.jpg
Best, Cesar

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ground beetle
Location: Bomassa, Republic of Congo
November 11, 2015 11:56 pm
I live in northern Congo and regularly come across interesting insects, some of which are probably little known or unknown to science.
I try to identify many of the arthropods I see here via iNaturalist, but many can use a lot of extra help – always appreciated!
Feel free to contact me at: naftalihonig@gmail.com
Signature: Naftali

Unknown Ground Beetle

Craspedophorus Ground Beetle

Dear Naftali,
We agree that this is a Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae, but at this time we are unable to provide you with a more specific name.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment.

Via iNaturalist a good bet seems Craspedophorus sp.
There are many spp. though…

According to a published paper we found, that genus is from Australia and Asia, but in Google Books Taxonomy, Phylogeny, and Zoogeography of Beetles and Ants online, it indicates:  “The carabid genus Craspedophorus, with over a hunderd species distributed through tropical Africa, Madagascar, Asia, and Australia is notable partly because of its usual dorsal color pattern, which consists of four yellow or orange spots on a blackish elytral background.  The spots are normally at or near the lateral margins of the elytra, two on each elytron, and when they are extensive, the dark background has even been described as forming a cross.”  Colnect indicates one species is pictured on a stamp from Portuguese Guinea.  The first species pictured on Carabidae of the World , Craspedophorus abnormis, is reported from “Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Zambia,” but alas, there is no image.  We believe you have discovered the correct genus.

No way to undercover (or name?) the species? I am just near the trinational border Cameroon-Congo-CAR…on the Congo side.

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Subject: aussietrev Big Brown Beetle
Location: Nth Burnett region. Queensland
November 11, 2015 10:32 pm
Hi guys.
This big beetle got caught up in some hail netting after a storm and unfortunately the ants got to it before I found it. They had removed pretty well all its legs, antennae and had started on the body but it was still alive and trying to get free. I have no idea what group it might belong in, and I guess the missing bits are going to make it hard to ID but can you help?
P.S> Did you get the link I sent you to the review on Pacific Corrinnidae that I contributed to?
Signature: aussietrev

Prionid

Poinciana Longicorn

Hi Trevor,
This is a Prionid in the subfamily Prioninae of the family of Longicorns, Cerambycidae.  It looks like it might be
Agrianome spinicollis which is pictured on the Atlas of Living Australia where it is described as:  “Very large, elongate beetle with long antennae. Wing covers yellowish-brown. Thorax reddish-brown, edged with a row of pointed teeth. Head with a pair of stout jaws.”  Previous postings on our site indicate the common name Poinciana Longicorn.
We cannot recall posting a link.  Please resend the information so we can link to the review on Pacific Corrinnidae.

Thanks guys. That beetle must be quite the traveler as there are no Poinciana anywhere around here. Wonder if they use any other native as a host?
The link is to a pdf of a rather large work by Robert Raven from the University of Queensland reviewing Western Pacific Corrinidaes to which I contributed specimens and photographs. One of my pictures was used for the cover art so now you know someone that is a famous published nature photographer. 🙂 It won’t be much use to anyone except dedicated spider nuts as it is a very technical work rather than a general use type of thing.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/z6zcivdts7x1r7m/Raven_2015_Corinnidae_Western%20Pacific.pdf?dl=0

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination