Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Beatle
Geographic location of the bug:  United states southern California, Rancho Cucamonga
Date: 06/10/2020
Time: 12:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
We came home to find this guy in our driveway. He wasabout 2 inches long with long antennae and a dark red/marrone/brown color. Do you know what kind of Beatle he is?
How you want your letter signe:  The Davies

California Prionus

Dear Davies,
June and July are the months we receive most North American Prionid sightings, a subfamily of especially large Long-Horned Borer Beetles.  This is a California Prionus or California Root Borer,
Prionus californicus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larva feed primarily on living deciduous trees (oaks, madrone, cottonwood) and are also recorded from roots of vines, grasses, and decomposing hardwoods and conifers. Will also attack fruit trees growing on light, well-drained soils (e.g. apple, cherry, peach).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug is this??
Geographic location of the bug:  North New Jersey
Date: 06/04/2020
Time: 06:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi. This bug was found on my daughters chair at a park we were at. They started screaming. I know why once I saw it.
How you want your letter signed:  K

Eyed Elater

Dear K,
This distinctive beetle is an Eyed Elater, the largest North American Click Beetle.  It is considered harmless to humans, and its large false eyespots will deter a large predator into thinking the Eyed Elater might be a much larger threat.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it? Thought it was a wasp.
Geographic location of the bug:  Upstate SC USA
Date: 06/04/2020
Time: 11:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is June 4th. Was 90°partly cloudy and humid. This was at 10:30pm. Cat caught and killed it. It is the size of an average wasp.
How you want your letter signed:  However

Male Glowworm

This is an adult male Glowworm Beetle.  Unlike Fireflies that have bioluminescent abilities, only the larval Glowworm glows.  The larval Glowworm is sometimes called a Railroad Worm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible Maple Borer Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cold Spring, NY, USA
Date: 06/05/2020
Time: 10:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this near a pond on my deck. I’ve never seen a beetle like this before. I have no idea what this is.
How you want your letter signed:  Rich

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Rich,
The Sugar Maple Borer is a much larger and even more colorful Beetle.  Your individual is also a member of the Longhorned Borer Beetle family Cerambycidae, and we believe we have identified it as 
Clytus ruricola, a species with no common name, thanks to images on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae in decaying hardwoods, esp. maple (Acer)” so it is theoretically a “Maple Borer.” 

Thanks. I did more research and it’s equivalent to the clytus ruricola. Very unusual but it’s native to northeast US. Thanks for the identification help. Feel free to use the image on your site for future identification. I’m going n Putnam County, NY.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug with debris on top
Geographic location of the bug:  southeast Louisiana
Date: 06/03/2020
Time: 08:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There were three of these critters on a tomato plant this May.  At first I just though they were large frass or small bird dropings.  On a closer look, I saw there were leg-like projections. I gently teased the debris off of one and discovered a beautiful, delicite being with what looked like a smiling frog face staring up at me.
How you want your letter signed:  Art

Clavate Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Art,
This is the larva of a Clavate Tortoise Beetle, Plagiometriona clavata, and the debris on its back is fecal matter and it thought to act as camouflage or protection for the larva.  Here is a BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide food plants include:  “ground-cherries (Physalis), Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), and Solanum spp. (Solanaceae)” and tomatoes are in the family Solanaceae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spanish fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Ipswich east anglia
Date: 05/27/2020
Time: 07:21 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman just spotted this on a margarita plant and can’t identify it! From google images it looks like a spanish fly
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Thick Legged Flower Beetle

Dear Chris,
This is not the Blister Beetle commonly called Spanish Fly.  It is a Thick Legged Flower Beetle,
Oedemera nobilis, which is profiled on Wildlife Insight where it states it is:  “a common beetle that can be identified by its dazzling colour and gap in the elytra (wing case). This gap in the elytra is not always so obvious but generally gives the appearance of wings that don’t close properly over its back. The males are very distinctive having obvious green bulges in their legs. These beetles certainly catch the eye with their metallic green wing cases glistenening in the sunlight as they feed in the open on flower heads.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination