Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rain Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Arnold, California 4000′
Date: 02/13/2020
Time: 09:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this beetle crawling across our cabin front porch. When I was looking at beetle photos to try to identify it, I thought it sort of looked like a California Rain Beetle, but I didn’t think they lived at 4000″ in the mountains.  Can you tell what this guy/gay is?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious Bug Fan

Rain Beetle

Dear Curious Bug Fan,
This is definitely a male Rain Beetle in the genus
Pleocoma, and it is our first submission of the season because California has had a very dry winter.  Perhaps Rain Beetle expert Gene St. Denis will write in with a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty beetle found on fishing pier
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 02/18/2020
Time: 11:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this handsome gentleman hiding in-between two slabs of concrete on a marine fishing pier. He’s very pretty! What does he eat? I’m not entirely sure why’d he prefer being close to the ocean- it just doesn’t look like he belongs!
How you want your letter signed:  Chance Arceneaux

Flea Beetle:  Disonycha pensylvanica

Dear Chance,
We believe we have identified this Leaf Beetle as
Disonycha pensylvanica thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “For the most part found near aquatic habitats” and “Normal hosts are Polygonum spp. including smartweed.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug found on inca trail
Geographic location of the bug:  Valle sagrado, Peru
Date: 02/06/2020
Time: 05:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey bug man! Found this interesting looking creature walking across the path! It has some pretty cool Armour!
How you want your letter signed:  Matt

Firefly (or Net-Winged Beetle) Larva

Dear Matt,
This is a Beetle Larva in one of two families.  Our first choice is a Firefly Larva in the family Lampyridae, but we would not discount that it might be a Net-Winged Beetle Larva in the family Lycidae.  Larvae from the two families are difficult to differentiate from one another.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a Cottonwood Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  AZ  Tucson
Date: 01/24/2020
Time: 07:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug on my bar which I had the top replaced with a large Mesquite slab.  This the second one I’ve found.  There was a lot of small wood chips and sawdust falling out of holes.  I was worried it was termites.
How you want your letter signed:  Mason

Bark Gnawing Beetle

Dear Mason,
Based on this BugGuide image, this is a Bark Gnawing Beetle in the genus
TemnoscheilaBugGuide does not describe the food preferences in its genus page, but of the family Trogossitidae, BugGuide notes:  “Many are predatory on other beetles and their larvae.”   Myrmecos states:  “Previously I’d encountered Temnoscheila only under the bark of dead trees, where they apparently prey on the larvae of other beetles.”  We have not located any information on the larvae, and we can speculate that if the larvae are also predatory on wood boring beetles, the two individuals you found may have emerged after spending their larval stages feeding in the mesquite slab, and they emerged after metamorphosis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  My bug post
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington
Date: 01/07/2020
Time: 08:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have identified my bug and it is the Diabolical Ironclad Beetle. I also found your answer about it to another person. Good info thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Jessica

Diabolical Ironclad Beetle

Dear Jessica,
You are absolutely correct with your identification of this Diabolical Ironclad Beetle,
Phloeodes diabolicus, a species that derives its common name because of its nearly impenetrable exoskeleton.  It seems you and Daniel are neighbors in Mount Washington, and it is nice to know that our local hippy chicks haven’t been totally supplanted by newer residents.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identify this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, N.M.
Date: 11/08/2019
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We are on the border of New Mexico and saw this bug about the approx  size of a quarter.
How you want your letter signed:  Gaila

Blister Beetle: Megetra species

Dear Gaila,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Megetra and we identified it on BugGuide.  There are three species in the genus, and two are found in New Mexico, but they look so similar, we cannot discern a difference.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination