Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug with debris on top
Geographic location of the bug:  southeast Louisiana
Date: 06/03/2020
Time: 08:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There were three of these critters on a tomato plant this May.  At first I just though they were large frass or small bird dropings.  On a closer look, I saw there were leg-like projections. I gently teased the debris off of one and discovered a beautiful, delicite being with what looked like a smiling frog face staring up at me.
How you want your letter signed:  Art

Clavate Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Art,
This is the larva of a Clavate Tortoise Beetle, Plagiometriona clavata, and the debris on its back is fecal matter and it thought to act as camouflage or protection for the larva.  Here is a BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide food plants include:  “ground-cherries (Physalis), Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), and Solanum spp. (Solanaceae)” and tomatoes are in the family Solanaceae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spanish fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Ipswich east anglia
Date: 05/27/2020
Time: 07:21 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman just spotted this on a margarita plant and can’t identify it! From google images it looks like a spanish fly
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Thick Legged Flower Beetle

Dear Chris,
This is not the Blister Beetle commonly called Spanish Fly.  It is a Thick Legged Flower Beetle,
Oedemera nobilis, which is profiled on Wildlife Insight where it states it is:  “a common beetle that can be identified by its dazzling colour and gap in the elytra (wing case). This gap in the elytra is not always so obvious but generally gives the appearance of wings that don’t close properly over its back. The males are very distinctive having obvious green bulges in their legs. These beetles certainly catch the eye with their metallic green wing cases glistenening in the sunlight as they feed in the open on flower heads.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Golden Shores AZ
Date: 03/28/2020
Time: 12:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’d like to know what kind of beetle this is
How you want your letter signed:  Please and thank you

Inflated Beetle

We have identified your beetle, Cysteodemus armatus, on BugGuide.  It is commonly called a Desert Spider Beetle or an Inflated Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown bug
Geographic location of the bug:  South Carolina
Date: 03/29/2020
Time: 05:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug in our house today. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Leta Wellman

Eyed Elater

Dear Leta,
This is an Eyed Elater, the largest Click Beetle in North America.  Is is harmless, and it poses no threat to your home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Kentucky
Date: 03/28/2020
Time: 11:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this never seen one before. 11:35pm march
How you want your letter signed:  Ellis

Water Scavenger Beetle

Dear Ellis,
We believe your aquatic beetle is a Water Scavenger Beetle in the family Hydrophilidae which is well represented on BugGuide.  Many aquatic insects, including Water Scavengers, are able to fly from pond to pond and some species may be attracted to lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp, hornet, or bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  Blue Ridge Mountains, Clarke County, VA
Date: 03/30/2020
Time: 03:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I noticed 2 or more dozen of these in a firewood pile I have on the side of my yard. I need to stack it to season for next winter. I don’t necessarily want to disturb bees if that’s what they are but I also don’t want to get stung by a swarm and find out if I’m allergic if they are Hornets or wasps.
How you want your letter signed:  Ross

Banded Ash Borer

Dear Ross,
This isn’t a “wasp, hornet, or bee” but rather a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the genus
Neoclytus, probably the Banded Ash Borer, a native species that we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults emerge May-Aug in the North, Feb-Nov in the South” and “often emerges indoors from firewood; sawlogs may become infested within 20 days of felling during summer.”  You will not be stung if you stack the wood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination