Currently viewing the category: "Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: borer ?
Location: Fredericksburg Va
July 30, 2016 7:29 pm
………….rainy times after hot dry spell
It was inside the house under a table lamp
A cloudy morning
Alive and still
One inch
Fredericksburg , Virginia
If it’s a borer of a tree of some sort…..we have MANY trees and many types>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
July 30th
If it”s a borer…it would be good to know its habitat!
Signature: susan warner

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Susan,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle,
Eburia quadrigeminata, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood.”  According to MoBugs:  “Deciduous woodlands and the nearby area is their favored habitat, but they will often come to lights at night. Females deposit eggs on hardwood trees, usually in the cracks of bark. (Let me clarify here, they will only feed on dead or decaying trees, they will not harm healthy living trees…Thanks Ted for pointing out my oversight).When the larvae hatches it will eat its way into the heartwood of the tree. They feed on the wood pulp. Adults will readily come to fermented molasses bait. In large numbers these beetles could become serious pests to trees, and can cause significant damage. Because of their boring habit, and their capability of reaching the center of even the largest of trees it is not uncommon for these beetles to emerge as much as 10 to 40 years later in wood that was used to make furniture or hardwood flooring.”  We suspect this individual was probably attracted to light or had some other accidental reason for appearing in your home, but we would not rule out the possibility that it might have emerged from some finished wood product or firewood stored indoors.  Since today is the last day of July, and it is time for us to select a new Bug of the Month, we will be featuring your submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: aquatic nymph as prey?
Location: Alexandria, VA
July 30, 2016 5:18 pm
Hi, I observed and photographed a Green Heron capture what I think might be a dragonfly naiad or some other aquatic nymph today at Huntley Meadows in Alexandria, Virginia. I wouldn’t expect a species ID, but do you think this is even an insect? I can’t think of another possibility…. Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Dear Seth,
What marvelous images you have submitted.  This larva appears to be a Water Tiger, the predatory, aquatic larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the genus
Dytiscus.  This posting is a marvelous addition to our Food Chain tag.

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Classy black beetle with orange dot. Not a lady bug.
Location: Troy, VA
July 30, 2016 12:45 pm
I saw this beetle last night and I think he is terribly elegant. I’m very curious as to what it is, I can’t find beetles like it with one orange dot. He does, alas, seem to be missing at least one leg.
thank you
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Polyphore Fungus Beetle:  Penthe obliquata

Polyphore Fungus Beetle: Penthe obliquata

Dear Grace,
This is a Polyphore Fungus Beetle in the family Tetratomidae,
Penthe obliquata, and we identified it in Arthur E. Evans wonderful book “Beetles of Eastern North America”.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Southwest Virginia
July 27, 2016 5:38 am
I found this bug in my house on a windowsill. I have never seen it before.
Signature: Terry Volant

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Terry,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood” and “Notorious for emerging from furniture after as many as 10-40 yrs.”  You just need to determine if this individual happened to wander in from the outside or if it emerged from a piece of furniture you have in your home.  We tend to lean toward the former.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Soldier Beetle?
Location: Massachusetts
July 27, 2016 4:51 am
We just had a large hatch of these, and hope that they are not enemies of my garden.
Signature: Farmer Bob

Banded Net-Wing

Banded Net-Wing

Dear Farmer Bob,
We just finished posting an especially lurid image of a group of Banded Net-Wing beetles, also from Massachusetts.  According to the genus page on BugGuide:  “adults take nectar; larvae prey on small arthropods under bark”
which would make them a beneficial species in your garden.

Thanks Daniel!
I found a similar lurid scene atop my car this morning.
Bob

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What beetle
Location: Central MA
July 27, 2016 4:11 am
A friend thinks a costa Rican beetle I think they were showing off
Signature: Inazuma Hiro

Banded Net-Winged Beetle

Banded Net-Winged Beetle

Dear Inazuma,
In a sense, you and your friend are both correct.  These are Banded Net-Wing beetles,
Calopteron reticulatum, and based on this Alamy image, the species ranges as far south as at least Costa Rica.  You image depicts quite a mating frenzy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination