Currently viewing the category: "Metallic Borer Beetles"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black & Yellow Beetle in SE New Mexico
Location: Southeaster New Mexico
October 4, 2015 4:52 pm
I found this on my walk this morning (October 3, 2015) on a nature trail on the outskirts of town in southeastern New Mexico. It was in the 90’s last week but has been cool and rainy the last few days. He / She did not look familiar. Every time I tried to get a close up, it would circle to the far side of the branch. It is black and yellow on its shield-shaped back with black and yellow bands on its underside. I searched your site and BugFinder for black and yellow beetles, but I didn’t find any that seemed to match. I love your site and the story behind it. Thanks for putting in all the time and effort.
Signature: Curious

Jewel Beetle: Gyascutus caelatus

Jewel Beetle: Gyascutus caelatus

Dear Curious,
We located this image on BugGuide that matches your Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle from the family Buprestidae.  The posting states that the collector:  “gave the specimen to New Mexico State University as they only had three of this species.”  Your individual was found on an Acacia, and according to BugGuide:  “Larval host unknown, adults on Acacia, Prosopis.”  This really is a beautiful Jewel Beetle and your observations indicate that the species has excellent eyesight.

Jewel Beetle: Gyascutus caelatus

Jewel Beetle: Gyascutus caelatus

I found your response on the website. Thank you, again, for your work. It was a kick to learn that I was probably right when I thought the beetle was unusual, if NMSU only had three in its collection. I found and photographed another bug on that same walk, but I am still looking online to see if I can identify it, If I can’t, I may forward it to you for your assistance.

We apologize if we did not write back to you directly as that is our usual method of responding upon posting a submission.

No apology necessary!  I knew to look on the website and found my submission there faster than I thought I would.  I am surprisingly proud that I found an unusual specimen (and I’m even happier I did not find the human louse as did someone else whose picture was posted on the same day as mine).  I just wanted to say thank you and didn’t know how to post directly to the website.  My technical knowledge is too antique to figure that out, so I responded directly to your email.  My apologies if I confused you.
I still haven’t had any luck finding the other bug I photographed on the same walk, so I will probably submit that, too.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s that bug?
Location: southwest Pennsylvania
July 17, 2015 12:09 pm
I couldn’t find the spot to send a bug to be identified. I have looked in my Audobon guide and on other websites, but couldn’t find it.
Signature: Everett

Red Legged Buprestis

Red Legged Buprestis

Dear Everett,
This gorgeous Jewel Beetle or Metallic Borer Beetle in the family Buprestidae is a Red Legged Buprestis,
Buprestis rufipes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in Minnesota
Location: Boulder Lake – Duluth, MN
June 29, 2015 9:17 am
Hi Bugman,
Ran across this guy late June near Boulder Lake in Duluth, mn. He flies and landed on my leg. Naturally I brushed him off and as I did, he pulled in his legs and played dead and fell to the ground. This is a good shot of the top. He had a little copper color on his belly. Any ideas?
Signature: Catie

Possibly Flathead Poplar Borer

Possibly Flat Headed Poplar Borer

Dear Catie,
This is a Metallic Borer Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and it is a member of the genus
Dicerca, possibly the Flat Headed Poplar Borer.  There is some really nice information on the University of Wisconsin Field Station site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle?
Location: Pennsylvania
June 28, 2015 1:53 pm
I spotted this what appears to be a form of beetle. I tried looking up the insect, but nothing resembles it’s color pattern. Can you help identify this bug, Thank You.
Signature: Bob

Red Legged Buprestid

Red Legged Buprestid

Dear Bob,
You encountered one of the Metallic Borer Beetles or Jewel Beetles in the family Buprestidae, the Red Legged Buprestis,
Buprestis rufipes.  The larvae are the stage that bores in wood, and according to BugGuide, the food plants include:  “Acer – Maple, Fagus – Beech, Nyssa sylvatica – Blackgum, Quercus – Oak, Ulmus – Elm.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetles
Location: southern BC, Canada
June 1, 2015 2:24 pm
I am sending 2 pictures of 2 different beetles I have found in the last 2 days. The turquoise/yellow obe was on my peonies and the other one was in the grass.
Signature: Jessica

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Hi Jessica,
Your second beetle in the grass is a Golden Buprestid, a species well documented in the Pacific Northwest, and a member of the family commonly called the Jewel Beetles.
  One of our favorite Golden Buprestid postings is of an individual that emerged from an eight year old cutting board.  We will be postdating your second beetle to go live later in June while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large green yellowish insect
Location: Athens Greece
May 24, 2015 8:09 am
I am in Athens, Greece, on the south coast at Voula suburb and I encluntered three of these insects on a small bush flower. I have never seen them before and no one around here can identify them. Would greatly appreciate your input. Region of Athens Greece, near the coast of Voula, month of May.
Signature: Olympia zacharakis

Ehrenbergi's Jewel Beetle

Ehrenbergi’s Jewel Beetle

Dear Olympia,
Because we recognized your beautiful beetles as Jewel Beetles or Metallic Borer Beetles in the family Buprestidae, it did not take long to identify them as Ehrenberg’s Jewel Beetles,
Julodis ehrenbergii.  We were excited to find a matching image on the Natural History of Thasos site, but alas, there was only general information on the family and the species in the image was not identified.  We continued to search and then discovered Dr. Bayram’s website and the species identification for your Jewel Beetle.  Allan Morley’s FlickRiver posting has this amusing observation:  “The Daddy of all bugs. Approx 4 inches long (10cm). I was walking in a likely area when with a thud this fella landed in front of me. He was on the ground, on his back and was clutching a flower head which had obviously upset him as he was giving it waldi. Having ripped off every petal and showed the flower who was boss he righted himself and I got this shot. I would have loved to have got down at eye level with him but I got the distinct impression that if I tried he would have taken my camera off me and hit me over the head with it. He was NOT in a good mood. After this he fired up like a 747 and flew off never to be seen again. What a beast!”

Ehrenbergi's Jewel Beetles

Ehrenbergi’s Jewel Beetles

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so so much! You just made my day and put a big smile on my face! It was a beautiful encounter and I stumbled upon them during my meditation walk. Very spiritual too. Jewel beetle… What a treat…
Bless you and the work your team does. I will pass it along and wish for people to donate as well.
All the best,
Olympia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination